Dealing with the concrete backer board/drywall butt joint


Hi all:
Pretty soon I'll start putting up the concrete backer board for a tub surround, with the rest of the bathroom covered with drywall. The backer boards' edges aren't tapered and as I'll be hanging the sheet rock horizontally the vertical joint between the drywall and backer boards will be a straight butt joint.
I have two choices as to where I can place these joints:
1) There are studs 28" out from the tub's long wall where I can meet the backer board and drywall. The vertical rails of the tub's sliding glass doors can be positioned here, hiding the vertical seam up to the top of the door, leaving only the couple of feet exposed to the ceiling and needing to be taped a covered with joint compound.
2) About 5" further out from the tub are vertical 2 x 4's turned sideways that I could also use as the landing point, but the butt seam would be exposed from floor to ceiling, requiring I attempt to hide it as best I could using tape and joint compound.
I do plan to run the tile out slightly past the tub itself.
Can I simply thinset the tile across the backer board/drywall butt joint if I place the backer board/drywall joint on those studs at 28"? I'm a bit concerned that the drywall, even hidden under the tile in this fashion, is too close to the tub and could suffer water damage over time.
Anybody think one choice is better than the other and, if so, why?
Or, is there some other way I should go about this?
TIA.
Tom Young
I am somewhat concerned that
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I think there are some newer water resistant wall board products that you might be able to use from floor to ceiling.
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*If the walls are open you can put some extra studs anywhere you want to make it work for you. I had one do-it-yourself customer who gutted his bathroom and put hardibacker board everywhere except the ceiling. No drywall.
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What "normally" happens is you break the butt so the tile extends on to the drywall an inch or or so thus hiding the transition..You may have to add a nailer in the right spot if you didn't plan for it or it is a renovation..Tape the joint with mud and tape...then feather the drywall side of the butt with joint compound...Done it many , many times...HTH...Good luck...
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Thanks. That's what I needed to know.
Tom Young
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