Dealing with acrylic over oil paint?

Hi,
I've purchased a house in which the previous owners have recently used acrylic paint over oil paint. I say this because the acrylic paint can be scraped off very easily (with a fingernail), and it appears to be oil paint underneath.
I would like to repaint with a latex. Do I need to scrape off all the acrylic, or can I use a primer over everything, then proceed with the new paint job? (If so, which primer?). Any other advise would be appreciated.
Thank you.
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No use just priming and painting, as this will have no effect on the bad bond underneath, and your new paint will continue to flake off. Best solution is the hardest - Use a wire brush, hand-held chisel, ice pick, scraper, etc, and locate (there may be areas where the bond is ok) , then scrape off loose acrylic paint using a combination of tools depending on shape of trim or wall, then scrub and sand rough edges and exposed patches of oil paint. Once this is roughed up, spot prime the exposed oil paint, fill where necessary, reprime the dried filler, and repaint whole area using acrylic or oil. I know it is a lot of effort, but likely the only way to proceed to get a lasting paint job.
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scribbled this interesting note:

The reason the existing paint is not bonded to the previous oil based paint is improper prep work. Properly prepared, the combination you describe will last a good, long while.
So far as I know, the only solution you will find is to remove the flaking paint and properly prep the work to be painted.
I have to ask, what's wrong with an oil based paint on the wood work in the home? Why not go back with a good, high quality oil based paint?
-- John Willis snipped-for-privacy@airmail.net (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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oil
"Acrylic" paint *is* latex.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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His post never indicated anything otherwise. Ah, usenet. 8-)
To the OP, I googled "latex over oil-based" and came up with this info among many others
http://www.dutchboy.com/faq/faq.asp?category=interior&answer  Can I apply latex paint over oil based paint? Yes. Be sure to prepare the surface properly before painting. Oil-based paints should be sanded to a flat finish before painting. After rinsing, apply Dutch Boy. oil-based primer and apply desired Dutch Boy. latex paint.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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dadiOH wrote:

Yes, I'm aware of that. The question still stands: do I need to scrape it all off, or is there a sealer which I can use over the acrylic-over-oil combination which is currently there? I assume if I just paint over the acrylic, it will not bond very well, as the acrylic itself is not bonding well to the oil.
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There's nothing inherently wrong with painting acrylic/latex over a sound oil-based finish. The problem is that some oil finishes are prone to chalking and if the chalking wasn't cleaned off before it was painted, you don't get a good bond and you get that intercoat flaking that you're seeing. Solution would be to remove everything that's loose (scrape, sand, etc.), scrub the surface, allow to dry, prime as needed and paint.
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On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 10:25:42 -0500, "Ranieri" <uh-uh> wrote:

Chalking occurs outside. I've never seen it indoors.
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used
can
you
seeing.
Me neither. I wonder if he's talking interior or exterior.
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Ranieri wrote:

sorry.....meant interior.
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Ranieri wrote:

Martha Stewart paint will chalk indoors. Pretty awful stuff.
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wrote:

Acrylic paint is _not_ latex. It is acrylic. Water based yes. There is a diffenence.
I believe we've been over this before.
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Missed the explanation. What is the difference?
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wrote:

Honestly can't answer that question directly. I don't know.
But a quick search found this. http://www.pcimag.com/CDA/ArticleInformation/coverstory/BNPCoverStoryItem/0,1848,133180,00.html
It would appear I've been incorrect. Acrylic paints are latex. But latex paint doesn't necessarily mean they are acrylic.
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http://www.pcimag.com/CDA/ArticleInformation/coverstory/BNPCoverStoryItem/0,1848,133180,00.html
OK, now you are correct on both counts. "Latex paints" is used rather loosely for different kinds of paints as your reference implies. The original ones were based on styrene-butadiene latex, but that gave way to the acrylics because of their better outdoor stability and general durability.
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Bingo.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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dadiOH wrote:

The reason I hate latex on trim and doors! I had the experience of painting a neighbor's condo before we faced the situation in our own. His old paint job was a nasty one, latex slopped on over food splatters and fingerprints on old, hard enamel. I had no choice but to scrape, pick and peel the latex because it could not be sanded. It came off in large sheets from the doors.
When we did our own condo, thankfully only a vacation home for many years so it had only one coat of paint in addition to the original, the contractor said that if the latex was intact he would prime over it and then paint. Hubby didn't want me peeling old paint for weeks and weeks, so that is what we opted to do. We are old retired fuddy duddies, so nobody is crashing into the woodwork and knocking the paint loose - the latex wasn't chipped or dinged, so the primer and paint went on nice and smoothe.
It is fine to use latex over oil if prepped and primed properly. I am a fanatic about prepping, because I don't like to paint often.
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wrote:

Probably.
I assume you are talking about the trim right?
or can I use a primer over everything, then proceed with the

Unlikely you'll find a primer that will penetrate & bond the unsound layers together.
If, I'd assumed correctly that it is the trim, you _may_ be able to remove it using masking tape.
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wrote:

This would be best answered by someone in a real paint store.
See if you can find one with a manager who has been in the business for a long time.
Not some kid behind the counter. I know this from experience- (I was one). <G>
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