Deadening stainless steel sink noise.

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I just got a nice big stainless steel sink for our kitchen. I love it, except it is loud and "tinny" when you drop stuff in it. I am thinking of pulling it out, and painting the entire underside with that thick.. black coating that is available for coating the back of pickup trucks. It is thick, and I think it would help deaden the sound. It is also made to stick to the truck in all weather conditions, so I imagine it will stick to the sink even though expansion and contraction/hot cold.
The coated side will be inside the cabinet, and never seen, so how it looks is not an issue. Because of sink placement, other traditional insulation is not really an option, so I need something that you "paint" on, and sticks to the metal.
I considered auto undercoating, but think this stuff goes on just as thick or thicker, and is made to be exposed so I think it would leave a better finish, even though it is unseen.
Any thoughts? Anything better out there that I should consider?.
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Automotive undercoating often remains sticky forever. You'll love that when you need to get under the sink and fix a leak.
What about that foam you spray into crevices around doors, to keep cold air out? I wonder if you could spray that on, and use a paint mixing stick to spread it into a layer of appropriate thickness.
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Dura-Line and others might work. As you said, you would have to remove the sink. Probably best to mask the rim and flange areas so you can re-install the faucet and sink baskets to a untreated surface. Let us know.
Bill
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This is a straight question: Why do you have to drop stuff in the sink? IOW, why not just set stuff gently in the sink?
[...]
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Jack wrote:

Go to your box store, lumber yard or other source and buy a quart of old fashioned Blackjack roof coating. It goes on as thick as you want, and dries to touch overnight and finally days, weeks later is pretty solid. It isn't exotic, not very pretty, but it works and it's cheap. If you want to experiment, use it as an adhesive for some sort of fiber or foam for more sound deadening. YMMV
Joe
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Joe wrote:

has any lung problems. It will continue to emit fumes for a long time.
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Jack wrote:

The spray should help, either the car undercoating or the truck bead stuff. I would try some on something else first to make sure there are no unknown down sides like bad smell etc..
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Spray foam insulation is worth a try.
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Jack wrote:

Might work. One concern: odor. How does this stuff smell, and for how long? You will not be popular if you make the kitchen smell like tar for more than a day or two.
How long has it been? You might find that you get used to the sound (like, don't notice it) after a month or so.
If you do it, let us know how it works. -- H
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Jack wrote:

check your local car stereo place, there are both brush on chemicals and stick on mats that are designed to dampen resonance in car bodies and would likely do the best job of all with your sink.
good luck,
nate
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This is probably a dumb idea: if you go to the homecenter and look at sinks, they have this black sheet thing stuck to the bottom (if it were roofing, I'd call it ice and water shield). The only reason I could think of why its there was for sound deadening. I've seen the same stuff on dishwashers. Your sink doesn't have this? What would happen if you got some "bituene" (I think thats the generic name for Ice and water shield) and put it all over the sides and bottom? Otherwise, I was thinking Auto undercoating too. Foundation water proofing?

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Being a former car audio enthusiast, I'd probably give dynamat a try in this application: http://www.crutchfield.com/S-xlrfABC5aVh/cgi-bin/ProdView.asp?g 1250&I410125&search=dynamat
I bet it would work rather nicely.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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Jack wrote:

in the sink.
For more constructive comments, I suggest that you not use auto undercoat since it is primarily tar. A better option is rubber, check around for rubber coatings that you can brush on. Another option is to use the stuff that they use for coating pickup beds. You don't need perfect coverage, just enough that breaks up the large surfaces that amplify sounds.
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That's not the only reason you'd want it but I doubt any coating would be real effective against sound. The other reason there should be some kind of spray-on lining is to prevent condensation on the bottom of the sink.
Ask around at non-big-box home improvement places, places that sell counters, kitchen remodelers, etc.
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on in a thin layer. I would think twice about doing it if you care at all about the underside finish, but it'll certainly deaden the sound.
Might require some artistic talent too - otherwise you might have a real mess under there!
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Maybe this adhesive backed sound deadening material would work, a lot easier than taking out the sink. See this web site: http://www.b-quiet.com /

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

You can get adhesive sheets of sound deadening material, used inside car door skins and the like. Much quicker, easier, and cleaner than any spray-on solutions.
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snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
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Please post back with your results.
Some sinks, but not all - as in your case - come with that coating already applied.
But, more importantly, how well did your solution work?
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replying to Jack, Helpful wrote:

I was trying to accomplish same thing with new SS sink. Came across an excellent low cost remedy after much searching. GT MAT Sound Control @ gtsoundcontrol.com. $13-$16 depending on thickness, enough for double bowl sink and free shipping. This is a strong adhesive sound dampening material for automotive applications. Top rated reviews by users. Better than adhesive material used by sink MFG's. Hope this info. is useful.
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On 04/21/2013 01:44 PM, Helpful wrote:

yep, any automotive sound control product will work and that is likely similar to what is used by sink mfgrs... Dynamat, Lizard Skin, whatever is available locally for you will work. Even plain old spray undercoating applied to the underside of the sink will work although it is messy and smelly until it sets up.
Along the same lines using some cheap (lowest R-value, so it's thinner and not compressed as much when shoved under the counter) fiberglass insulation to wrap the tub of a dishwasher does wonders to control sound. Did that for a friend of mine when he installed a used dishwasher, it acts like an expensive "super quiet" dishwasher but only added $13 (plus a little bit of foil duct tape that I used) to the cost of the installation.
nate
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