Deadbolt Inner Knob Guard

I've googled around but couldn't find what I wanted so I though somebody here might know the answer. My front door has a single-tumbler deadbolt, that is, with just a knob inside for unlocking it. I'd like to get some sort of guard to slip over the knob when I go on vacation so that someone can't just break the glass in the small window, reach through and open the door.
I know, a double-tumbler lock would be better but I just wondered if somebody has invented a metal cage gizmo that clips over the edge of the door and prevents turning the deadbolt knob. Or maybe a double cover where the inner part snaps onto the knob while the outer shell turns independently, so that reaching in and turning it won't move the knob.
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Pavel314 wrote:

might know the answer. My front door has a single-tumbler deadbolt, that is, with just a knob inside for unlocking it. I'd like to get some sort of guard to slip over the knob when I go on vacation so that someone can't just break the glass in the small window, reach through and open the door.

has invented a metal cage gizmo that clips over the edge of the door and prevents turning the deadbolt knob. Or maybe a double cover where the inner part snaps onto the knob while the outer shell turns independently, so that reaching in and turning it won't move the knob.

Does the inside knob come off? If so, you might remove it while you are on vacation.
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On Tuesday, July 17, 2012 12:32:11 PM UTC-4, Ken wrote:

Good idea, as long as the inside knob isn't holding the whole thing together. I'll check that out.
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I've never seen one that would.
You may need to buy a cheap double cylinder deadbolt, and put it on while you are on vacation.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Good idea, as long as the inside knob isn't holding the whole thing together. I'll check that out.
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Since you are attempting to prevent a break-in via this one means - the turning of the dead bolt knob - have you looked at every other possible entry point and dealt with them also?
Windows, side doors, garage doors, etc. If not, then if the burgler can't get in through this door because you've secured the dead bolt, (s)he'll just move on to an entry with easier access.
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I've seen deadbolts where the inside knob was replaced by a key. You leave the key in the deadbolt at all times so you can get out if needed, except you remove the jay when you are concerned about the type of break-ins you described.
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Yes, "institutional function" lock sets are expensive, they are also very very dangerous to install in buildings which are not equipped with fire sprinkler systems...
I like how people say that it is just fine to install double cylinder locks in their homes as they will always leave a key on the inside of the door when they are home and only remove it when they are away on vacation...
In a panic situation people have been known to turn things hard enough to break them, double cylinder locks also can lock you in when you may want to be able to leave at other times, like if you come home and lock the door behind you and put your keys down -- if you walk into a burglary you may find that you are unable to reach your keys to escape...
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With most residential grade deadbolt locks, what you want to do is not possible as if you make the inside thumb turn unable to move you would not be able to lock the door on the outside using the key because the turn knob is an integral part of the lock and the tailpiece from the cylinder is directly connected through the locks bolt into the shaft of the turn knob... If you worry about people burglarizing your home when you are away, either invite someone you know and trust to house sit for you or install a monitored alarm system...
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