Dang! More Fuel Cell information!

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Yes you are. The OP supported it below.

But the biggest single variable is government policy: Some countries tax gasoline heavily; others subsidize it to make it cheap. Many countries chose the former. In the United States, state and local taxes account for about 19 percent of the average price of a gallon of gasoline, according to the Energy Information Administration. In England, where London drivers are paying nearly $9 a gallon, taxes account for a whopping 81.5 percent of the pump price. European countries have long relied on hefty fuel levies to fund road work and social programs, and to encourage conservation. The same is true for some Asian nations, including South Korea ($7.33 a gallon) and Japan ($6.30) - both of which import 100 percent of their crude. http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2008/jul/14/compared_other_countries_gasolin e_good_deal_us/
usually don't like wikipedia, but this is a good source since it points to myriad of others saying the same thing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_tax#Tax_rates Some samples: Full tax rate is near 55% of motor fuel prices in Russia. Dutch taxes one of the highest in the world. In total, taxes account for 68,84% of the total price of petrol and 56,55% of the total price of diesel. In contrast, For the first quarter of 2009, the mean state gasoline tax is 27.2 cents per US gallon, plus 18.4 cents per US gallon federal tax making the total 45.6 cents per US gallon (12.0 ?/L). For diesel, the mean state tax is 26.6 cents per US gallon plus an additional 24.4 cents per US gallon federal tax making the total 50.8 cents US per gallon (13.4 ?/L). There are obviously some differences related to transportation, etc., most the overwhelming majority of the differences in the US and other countries is the taxes. Also, I would point out that many countries (including China and some oil producing countries) subsidize the costs of fuel to keep the locals happy. This further confuses the country-to-country comparisons. in short, the biggest reason for differences is governmental policies on taxation.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

Well, sure. The price of the raw material is virtually the same for every country.
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They are making "huge profits" because they are big companies. The average profit margin for oil companies run around 8%, the average industrial profit margin is around 6.5%. (If you back out the auto industry, they have a profit margin that is actually less than average). I might take your umbrage about oil company profits a little more seriously if you were even more upset about biotech and computer software where the profit margin runs to just under 20%. If you make 8%, you are going to make more profits at $100 than at $10. Profit numbers are so high because the amount sold is so high.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

It's well known that the combination mini-mart and gas station (We call 'em "Stop-N-Robs") makes a higher percentage profit on Beef Jerky than it does on fuel.
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