Damn, it's cold

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Soo.... *all* fireplaces burn wood, you're saying?
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Banty wrote:

...
...
Only seriously questioning that _all_ burn something *other than* wood, actually...
--


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Tightly rolled newspapers soaked in used motor oil. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Speak softly and carry a loaded .45 Lifetime member; Vast Right Wing Conspiricy Web Site: www.destarr.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
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I tell you what works well along side the oil soaked paper rolls. Put in the whole used spin on oil filters. Those some beaches get hot and send a flame out the end that doesn't quit for several minutes. They work great if you have a supply of them.
s

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on 12/17/2007 10:40 AM Banty said the following:

Nope. But not many specifically say gas or electric fireplace. I searched 9 pages under that google search and there was no mention of any law banning wood burning fireplaces. I googled on 'wood burning fireplace rochester ny' and there are houses for sale featuring wood burning fireplaces. Still no reference to a ban on wood burning fireplaces. I suppose Joe will provide a cite.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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That's the information I got from two realtors back in 1982, when I was shopping for my first house. I said "fireplace", they said "not in the city limits". It was confirmed by the guy who inspected and cleaned our fireplace, who said "Two blocks west and you'd be in the city. No fireplace use allowed". Maybe it changed.
I don't have time to check, but you can, if you like: http://gcp.esub.net/cgi-bin/om_isapi.dll?clientIDE466&infobase=rochestr.nfo&softpage=Browse_Frame_Pg42
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on 12/17/2007 12:42 PM JoeSpareBedroom said the following:

http://gcp.esub.net/cgi-bin/om_isapi.dll?clientIDE466&infobase=rochestr.nfo&softpage=Browse_Frame_Pg42
No search results on 'fireplace' in that code. The closest match is Ch. 100: Smoke and Air Pollution Control which mentions smoke and nuisances.
100-3 Dense smoke is hereby declared to be a nuisance, and the emission or escape thereof from any locomotive, tug, boat, stack, chimney or flue of any premises, building, fuel-burning equipment, roundhouse, portable equipment or other similar contrivance or from any open fire shall be unlawful; provided, however, that the following exceptions to the provisions of this section shall be permitted.
100-4 A. No person shall cause, suffer or allow to be emitted into the open air from any fuel-burning equipment or premises, or to pass a convenient measuring point nearest to the stack outlet, dust in the gases to exceed 0.85 pounds per 1,000 pounds of gases, adjusted to 50% excess air for products of combustion, excepting that for fuel-burning equipment or premises constructed subsequent to the effective date of this chapter, a minimum dust-collecting efficiency of at least 85% shall be required for special dust-separating equipment, and that for fuel-burning equipment or premises constructed prior to the effective date of this chapter, a minimum dust-collecting efficiency of at least 75% shall be required for special dust-separating equipment. The limitations given shall be waived during periods when breakdown of equipment occurs such as to make it evident that the emission was not reasonably preventable. The amount of solids in the gases shall be determined according to the Test Code for Dust-Separating Apparatus of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, revised and amended to date, which is hereby made a part of this chapter by reference.
199-4 B. Acid or other fumes, noxious gases, strong odors, dust, dirt, soot, cinders and fly ash, emitted or allowed to escape in such quantity or volume as to be detrimental to the public or to endanger the health and safety of the public or to cause the injury or damage to the property or business of any person, are hereby declared a nuisance, and the emission or escape thereof from any locomotive, tug or boat, stack, chimney or flue of any premises, building, combustion equipment, roundhouse, portable equipment or other similar contrivance or from any open fire shall be unlawful.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I wonder how people get away with driving Chrysler/Dodge mini-vans, then.
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That position and PC effect are moving East. Buy a house in NV and you get disclaimers about what CA has declared...
SD and SF did a lights out program awhile back. Turn off the lights for a night or something like that.

For years wood burning has been banned in Las Vegas. Homes built earlier with a real fire place were grand fathered and still are allowed to use wood for heat.
A week ago my furnace needed a repair. I used the gas fire place and fake logs to warm up a little. :)
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Re Re: Damn, it's cold:

The original post referred to wood burning being bad for the *planet*. The LA or SF or SD air basins are not the planet. They are environmental aberrations cause by man over crowding a basin created by too many people in one place, mountains, on-shore breezes and inversions.
You people in La La land think the world evolves around you but it doesn't.
Moron
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Uh, maybe it's specific to YOUR location, and how some folks operate non-EPA-compliant woodstoves. Think: population density & inversion layering.
So your blanket statement is kinda irrelevant here.
John

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"epa compliant woodstove"??? You're kidding right? what's to be compliant about a steel box with a hole in the top?
s

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"S. Barker"

Dunno but he's either the same person or another who thinks there really is such a thing. Perhaps it's a marketing scam some folks buy into?
Now safety compliant, yes. How it's vented and such. The only 'EPA' relevance I can think of, have to do with what you burn, not what you burn it in. Dont use treated wood for example due to the chemicals which can be carginogenic when burning.
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I know a few years back, they were using a catalytic converter to clean the air. Has to meet a certain efficiency also, IIRC.
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Yep. A lot of construction, air flow, low pollution, etc regulations have to met to even sell a stove now-a-days. I don't think you can even produce a non-compliant stove for the market any more.
The 'compliant' sstoves are far more efficient and produce way less pollutants than the old "Iron box with a hole" types.
Of course the 'efficiency' and 'pollutant' bits rely on them being operated correctly.
Harry K
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EPA compliant woodstoves have a secondary combustion system that re-burns the combustion gases prior to their release. This is accomplished with either a catalyst or what are called secondary burn tubes located immediately below the top baffle (non-catalytic). The efficiency of these stoves is nearly twice that of a conventional airtight design (i.e., 75 to 80 per cent) and the amount of particulate produced is extremely low -- typically in the order of 3 grams per hour.
For a simplified overview, see: http://www.regency-fire.com/Faq/Wood.php
Cheers, Paul
On Sun, 16 Dec 2007 22:25:09 -0600, "S. Barker"

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ya i bet a good load of green hedge would plug that yuppified thing up in a hour.
s
wrote:

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I guess that presupposes anyone would be dumb enough to burn anything green in a woodstove regardless of its kind. Be that as it may, a non-catalytic would be the better performer; well, at least up to the point the chimney catches on fire. ;-)
Cheers, Paul
On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 09:44:24 -0600, "S. Barker"

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we burn what we have. When you heat 100% with wood, you burn what's available. If it happens to be green, then so be it. You just have to burn it a bit hotter to keep the chimney clean.
s

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In relation to EPA certified woodstoves and the broader question of the environmental impacts of burning wood, this story appeared in the December 16th edition of the Toronto Star.
http://www.thestar.com/News/article/285983
Cheers, Paul
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