Daisy-Chaining Light Bulbs: Wire?

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Just install something that is NEC compliant. Sure, what you have will work, but at what future cost? A temp install is that. Many of us have seen temp installs that are many years old. Not all of those encounters have good endings.
Personally, I would install an eight foot flourescent fixture with proper wiring methods. Your temp install would be something to get you by while performing that task (two four foot fixtures separated by approved methods might give better lighting results).
I would guestimate the entire project would cost less than fifty bucks, if you do it. Now, the question is, should you be the one doing it? If not, then the under fifty guestimate goes out the door unless you know a friend that is qualified to six-pack if for you. :-)
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On Fri, 17 Jan 2014 14:22:48 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Someone could get electrocuted. It has been explained every single week forever.
Your question is like asking.......what happens if you throw a TV out a 10 story building onto the sidewalk?

No strain relief increases the chances that the hot may come in contact with the ungrounded metal box without tripping a breaker.
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On 1/17/2014 1:02 PM, philo wrote:

+1

Ditto...
Hadn't seen the photo link -- that's a spot even I wouldn't neglect the mechanical protection rule: both that and the missing cable clamps will definitely be picked up on by any inspector for a sale and will require fixing then so may as well do it right to begin with. It'll look better in the end, besides.
--



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On 1/15/2014 6:37 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

You really mean 25 W bulbs or...oh, CFL's; can't get used to not being incandescent.
In addition to other comments note that while it's electrically ok, by Code exposed wiring in an accessible space is required to be protected if it isn't in the attic space above the garage but run on surface between fixtures.
As a convenience factor, while it's a little more effort, it would be _a_good_thing_ (tm) to have at least one set of these on a second circuit so wouldn't be in dark if a single breaker tripped while in the garage while there's not external light available (that is, after dark).
--



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Per dpb:

I'm figuring there's a functional reason for Code rules.... and maybe that's it for this one.
I take "Protected" to mean more immune to foreign objects breaking through the insulation and exposing wire... and that would make sense. The exposure with small appliance cords is there... but we live with that because of the convenience/usability tradeoffs. OTOH, on long fixed runs, there's no convenience/usability consideration so we want protection.
Does that fly?
If so, what about the ground wire. Assuming plastic boxes, would there be an alternative #14 wire without the wasted ground wire?
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 1/16/2014 10:31 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

A large part of the UL investigation for flexible cord is flexibility. That is not an issue for romex, and it is investigated for rather different properties. I wouldn't use flexible cord (even with the right wire size) as a replacement for romex except for temporary use.

Romex to a few lights in a garage costs that much?
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I might still have a few pieces of NMD2 without ground lying around - from past tear-outs
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Per bud--:

No... it's just the idea... wasting that conductor.
Probably easier to physically manipulate with only 2 conductors too.
If there were two legal products on the same shelf side-by-side, I'd pick the one without the unused ground.
But I agree with the spirit of your observation.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On Thursday, January 16, 2014 11:48:48 AM UTC-5, bud-- wrote:

That's probably the best answer so far..... Only issue there is IDK if HD, etc sell Romex by the foot like they do lamp wire, etc. Might have to buy 25ft roll, but maybe they do sell it by the foot. If it's by the foot, I agree, not enough cost diff to worry about and it's not code to use lamp wire. Plus depending on if the wire is visible, if the house is sold, it's something any inspector should find and flag.
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wrote:

None made any more. Not since the sixties that would be "approved"
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On Thursday, January 16, 2014 12:40:13 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've never seen someone so hung up on a "wasted" ground wire that is part of romex. I just went to HD website to see the cost difference between 14-2 Romex with grnd and 16 gauge lamp cord. They sell both by the foot. Romex is 44 cents and lamp cord is 41 cents. If you buy 25 ft to run some garage lights, why all the fuss?
And aside from the price and code compliance, proper code compliant clamps are made for securing romex to the boxes, romex can be stapled with standard, available staples, etc. I just don't see the need to wander in the wilderness.
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On 1/16/2014 12:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

And what are the odds of someone get a shock from a ceiling box, as pictured? I know it's not code, but it should be safe.
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On Thu, 16 Jan 2014 18:15:05 -0500, Stormin Mormon

What are the odds............:) This is the stuff that keep safety conscience people up at night. http://www.bored.com/crazywarnings/
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Per Metspitzer:

I heard a standup comedian observe that the really scary part about warnings like that is that somebody probably did whatever was being warned against... or there would not have been just that warning.
--
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On Thu, 16 Jan 2014 18:15:05 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Not "safe" without the clamps.
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On 1/16/2014 10:31 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

What, specifically, is it that "that" refers to? Wiring and device cords are two completely different animals by Code; one has nothing whatever to do with the other as far as compliance rules.
You don't say how you did the installation; if you did run romex between outlets and tacked it to the ceiling joists, then think "conduit" between to make it legal or the surface-mount square tube or you could get by with a "canal" made of furring strips on either side.
But, yes, it is simply mechanical protection, not electrical/functional in the requirement. I've got places here on the farm where I haven't follow the rule because in reality the location is so high and there is no likelihood of equipment or other stuff actually ever getting in contact with it and it's never going to be an issue of needing inspection or a requiring correction for future sale or any such thing; I simply bring it up as in a residential garage while the same may be true for the height/accessibility part so it really may not be an issue from a practical standpoint, the likelihood is pretty good that at some point the inspection/sale may require rework that may as well just avoid from the git-go. Plus, overall, it's just "the thing to do" even if can get away with less.

Again by Code, the ground is to be there. I've not kept up on changes in Code for existing two-wire circuits as far as whether they're still grandfathered or not and of course it's any local jurisdiction that has actual control/say-so even if NEC does still allow it. You could, physically, run two single wires (say conduit) but in short chunks probably as costly if not more so than the Romex anyway.
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