cutting straight edge in wood with dremel

I've got a cabinet in the laundry room (see pics) where I want to cut off about 1/4" from bottom (bottom face). I will stop perhaps 2 " from each end of cabinet. The board / trim is about 11/16" thick and has 1/2" clear on back side from bottom before I reach the inside trim piece (picture 3 of 4).
http://s456.photobucket.com/albums/qq285/doug23314/Public /
I was told to consider using a dremel but do they sell an attachment that would allow me to cut a straight edge 1/4" from bottom? I don't want jaggered cuts and I don't know right now if the bottom is perfectly level.
And is there a better tool for this? I already have a dremel tho. What type of dremel blade and accessory is good for this cut? I don't know if this is some kind of composite board or wood since it's painted. Feels like wood but I can't be 100% sure.
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http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/68/Belt_sander_bosch.jpg
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On Sun, 27 May 2012 19:27:51 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

See above.
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"above" says you are stopping 2" short of the walls, you have to do some sort of a finishing of the rough edges of where you are cutting back to the old dimension. A diagonal taper, or something.
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 12:50:42 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

>>http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/68/Belt_sander_bosch....Hide quoted text -

Correct. I was thinking of just a perpendicular cut (parallel to the walls).
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A Dremel isn't the right tool to cut wood, particularly wood that thick. They're really not intended for wood; not nearly powerful enough. A circular saw, with the right blade would work much better. A fence clamped to the frame would help a lot.
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On 5/27/2012 9:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Actually they are intended to cut wood. I have a router attachment for my Dremel. Have only tried it a couple of times but not used for any projects. It is rather nice, but the bits are small.
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I was thinking about the cut-off wheels. Routing a straight line with a Dremel is going to be a *major* challenge. It's simply the wrong tool for the job.
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Doug wrote:

Personally, I wouldn't try using a Dremel. I'd probably use a jig saw, preferably with a board clamped/nailed to the frame as a guide. If a guide isn't possible, I'd draw a line and follow as best as possible. In either case - ANY case, actually - you'll need to smooth and clean up with a plane. I wouldn't use a circular saw...too heavy, agressive and too small an area to rest saw even if you take off the door(s).
--

dadiOH
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Doug wrote:

This is a project ideally suited to the Harbor Freight Miracle Multifunction tool (with a "fence" clamped to the work).
http://www.harborfreight.com/oscillating-multifunction-power-tool-68303.html
It's on sale for $29.99, but if you can wait a bit - and get on their mailing list - the tool is available for $18.99 every couple of months or so.
Seriously, for what this tool does, it has no peer. You'll find new uses every day! Not long ago, I found the tool could mix up an oil and vinegar dressing so the two ingredients didn't separate!
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Use a circular saw (with a "fence" clamped to the work).

You'll never get a straight line.

Useful tools, to be sure, but this isn't one.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

It will cut a line as straight as the Pope. And he won't have to remove the door as he would if trying to use a 15-pound circular saw.
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That's exactly what I mean.

Four screws.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Yep. In the past week, I used a Dremel on a cabinet door. I used the tool to cut the heads off the screws holding the door in place as it was petrified by at least three coats of some god-awful paint.
Once that awfulness was out of the way, I was able to vise-grip the screw stubs to remove the suckers.
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Good grief. These things from the bronze age?
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Early '60's for sure.
Anyway, that process turned out to be too much work and too time consuming. I searched for a better way.
At first I tried incantations hoping for a miracle. Inasmuch as I had been a bad boy all week, my prostrations and entreaties evidently fell on deaf ears. (I considered a burnt offering, but then thought, "Nah".)
I finally settles on slathering a hefty dose of fuming methylene chloride. The screws surrendered. All turned out well.
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