Cutting/sawing a hot water tank in half.

Okay, this is a goofy question.
Has anyone ever tried cutting or sawing the inside tank of an electric hot water heater in half?
I took an old electric hot water heater apart and I am left with just the steel inside tank. I am thinking about cutting it in half by using a circular saw with a metal-cutting blade and cutting it around the middle. Mostly I am just thinking that it will be easier to lug each half out of the basement, and it will be easier for the trash guys to pick up and discard if I cut it in half.
I know, I have way too much free time on my hands. But, seriously, I am curious if anyone has ever tried this and, if so, how hard it was to cut in half.
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Steve56A wrote:

If you use an abrasive saw you will wind up with a basement full of lung irritants. Put a couple of 3/4" nipples in the top for handles and get someone to help haul it up.
Jim
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Wow, 3/4" nipples ????? Those must come from a BIG woman !!!
Redneck69
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If you are hell-bent on cutting it in half, use a reciprocating saw (Saw-zall) not a circular saw. Less metal dust and cheaper blades.
But as was suggested - just get some help and carry it out in one piece. The bulk pickup guys pick these up for a living.

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Why would you need to do that? Most hot water heaters are fairly light after they've been emptied.
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It will cost more in blades than the tank is worth
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Steve56A writes:

If you're going to all that trouble, you might as well add some hinges and turn it into a barbecue, instead of throwing it out.
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On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 22:25:55 -0600, Richard J Kinch

I wish I'd thought of that. I cut one in half last year, but did it so I ended up with two open topped cylinders.
Cutting the long way would have been tricky, but it would have made a great smoker.
I used a plywood blade in my circular saw. When I first read of that method of cutting steel I was doubtful, but I've cut 50-60' of heavy gauge steel with it and it's black & ugly now, but still does the trick. [and it wouldn't cut plywood when I started.]
I don't think I'd perform that operation in the basement, though. If I really had to cut it in half there, I'd use cutting oil and metal blades in a jigsaw or reciprocating saw.
Jim
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In that case, you line it with refractory cement and melt iron in it.
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As others have said, it is easy to move one once it is empty. I removed mine from the basement by myelf. If you really want to cut it up, that is also easy, simple and cheap. I did it to make a watering trough.
Sabre saw and metal cutting blade. I think I busted one blade, the other is still useable. It is a NOISY operation but no dust to worry about, only the cuttings to clean up. My total cut was two lenghthwise and 2 1/3 way around each end, time about 10 minutes. You can also use a cutting torch but need really good ventilation (see barbecue below).
As for making a barbecue - don't do it. Galvanized plus barbecue temps equal poison gas. You might be able to burn it off before useing it but I wouldn't try it.
Harry K
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I removed a thirty gallon tank which was twenty some years old in an area of fairly hard water. It must have weighed two hundred pounds or more from all the sediment built up in it over the years! I got it out of the basement myself but nearly busted a gut doing so. New tank felt ten times lighter. Would surely get some help next time and try the "pipe handle" solution given earlier or try cutting. -Dan
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Thanks for all of the comments and ideas.
I was mostly trying to get an idea about how thick the steel is on the tank and how hard it is to cut. Based on the comments from those who actually cut a hot water tank in the past, it seems like the cutting process is not too difficult.
The tank is at someone else's house, so the next time I go there I think I'll bring both types of saws and take a try at it -- mostly out of curiosity. I know I can always just get someone to help me carry it out, and that might be what I end up doing.
Thanks again.

the
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in
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Don't try it with a circular saw even with a metal blade. You will have dust, noise...noise and more noise. Sabre saw or sawzall is the way to go. Blades are a lot cheaper too.
Harry K
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Steve56A wrote:

If I really wanted to do something like that, I would use an ax.
Bob
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Please tell us what you find out. I know of at least one house that has three or four hot water heaters lined up in the cellar. Cause plumbers don't feel like hauling them out.
--

Christopher A. Young
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That is why there are junk guys. I hired a company to get rid of my old chicken coop, and the routine was "anything that 2 guys can carry, and you pay by the qtr truckload". In my case it was a half truck load worth.
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I cut mine accross the top, down one side and accross the bottom and spread it open like a clamshell and used it as a covered pig feeder several years ago when we raised 5 hogs for ourselves and family. I used a Milwaukee Sawzall with a metal cutting blade. Only took one blade. Maybe an eighth inch thick at the thickest. Needless to say use eye and ear protection. I was an installer for several years and if a plumber comes into your house and doesn't take his waste with him. Well that just ain't right!
Mick
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