Cutting rubber tiles

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What is a quick and easy way to cut 5/8" thick rubber tiles made from recycled car tires?
(I have about 60 tiles to cut. A utility knife will take forever).
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gcotterl wrote:

We used a "decoupeerzaag", (dutch) or according to google, a jigsaw.
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wrote:

Try a regular circular saw.
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In spewed forth:

why not a Guillotine Paper Cutter
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In spewed forth:

I've cut 1/4" plywood with mine, rubber should shear easily
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On 5/20/2011 6:52 PM, ChairMan wrote:

Wood cuts easier than rubber. The bend-to-cut idea will work- I have used similar cutting techniques before- but it will be slow. I'd set up a jig with some 2x and plywood and use a saw. Projects like this are what HF blades are for.
--
aem sends...

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The tiles are not made from recycled steel-belted tires.
What are "HF blades"?
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On 5/20/2011 9:51 PM, gcotterl wrote:

--
aem sends...

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On Fri, 20 May 2011 18:51:36 -0700 (PDT), gcotterl

High-Fallutin'
or History Foremost
or Harbor Freight.
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In spewed forth:

a hot knife would work
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I used a Skilsaw jigsaw and it cut the tiles just fine.
The tiles were a terra-cotta color so I started using a yellow wax pencil but the lines quickly became so wide that I couldn't tell exactly where to cut. I then switched to a black felt-tip Sharpie marker that applied a thin line that was fairly easy to see against the reddish tile.
70% of the tiles did not need to be cut.
15% of the tiles (around the perimeter of my patio) had to have about 6 inches cut off one side.
10% of the tiles were cut to a couple of inches wide.
5% of the tiles had to cut to fit around posts, pipes and other obstructions so these took the most time to measure and cut.
I did use a utility knfe to shave off excess tile material when my cuts were a little off or to make minor adjustments for uneven stucco or when the concrete slab had bumps or other protuberances.
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The Skil jigsaw belongs to my brother. I assume the blade originally came with the saw. The teeth looked fairly coarse but they made very clean cuts (they didn't chew up the rubber).
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Make a little jig. What you want to do is bend the tile slightly. Put the tile in the jig and tighten the clamps to bend it slightly. Score with a SHARP utility knife slightly so that the cut in the tile is bent, and opens slightly. Make your second cut using a straight edge, or the piece you have made your jig out of. The second cut will be right in the first, and the bending action of the jig will make it cut very easily by spreading the cut wider as you cut deeper.
I'd make a jig like this:
Cut a piece of plywood oversize. Make three 1x3's with one hole drilled one inch in from each end. The sizes of these things will depend on the size of the tiles you are using. Cut a 2x4 on edge to get a slight angle, about 200 degrees.. Attach the two pieces of plywood to make a bent work surface. You are making a slightly bent work area to clamp down a tile, then clamp down the part you want to cut off so that the bending action will allow you to keep the cut open. It should take about four slices to cut through each tile.
If you have ever cut conveyor belt, you know how hard that is. Some of it is 1/2" or better, and some of it has reinforcing webbing. This is the fast way to cut heavy industrial conveyor belt made of some VERY tough rubber. It should work on your softer rubber tiles.
The angle of your breakover should be about 200 degrees. So, if you look at a 200 degree angle from the side, you would be looking at the side of your jig, with two clamps on the big side, and one on the small side. Use long carriage bolts and wingnuts to hold the 1 x 3's tight against the tiles.
It's very simple, although it sounds a little complicated. If you can't grasp this, reply, and I'll draw it, and take a picture and post on flickr.
HTH
Steve
Heart surgery pending? www.cabgbypasssurgery.com Heart Surgery Survival Guide
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A pic would be great!
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A pic would be great!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/deserttraveler /
Just drawings, but it should give you the idea of the thing. You can make the middle clamp out of metal, or just use a metal ruler for a cutting guide. A metal clamp, like a piece of square steel tubing would be safer, give you a straight cut, and wouldn't get cut by the blade.
Steve
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Now I see what you're describing. I'll give it a try and post my results.
Thanks.
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Now I see what you're describing. I'll give it a try and post my results.
Thanks.
All you want to do is have the cut open up so you can make successive cuts without having the cut edges put drag on the blade. This jig works to get you nice straight repetitive cuts. When cutting conveyor belt, you can do it by just bending it over a bench edge and using a piece of flat bar or angle clamped to the work bench, and an assistant bending the cutoff side. Just enough to open the cut. Don't try to cut through all in one slice, take your time and don't cut any major arteries, and use a sharp new blade.
Good luck.
Steve
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On Fri, 20 May 2011 15:04:21 -0700, "Steve B"

It's amazing how much sharper a sharp blad is than a used blade.
BTW, I understand cutting paper with scissors will dull them because something in paper is abrasive. That you can ruin sewing scissors and hair scissors by cutting paper with them.
Are there any other materials which dull blades faster than average, faster than they seem like they would, judging from hardness or my ability to tear them apart, for example?
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wrote:

I bought two of those 100 blade dispensers, plus one dispenser of blades with a hook on them for $1 each at a yard sale. Stanley they were. I still haven't used them all.
Steve
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On Fri, 20 May 2011 13:20:13 -0700 (PDT), gcotterl

Never heard of such a thing, but it sounds like the cattle mats us farmers use in animal stalls. I've cut the stall mats with a saber saw. Takes a long time, but it works. It should be easier to cut a 12" time than a 4x8 foot sheet that weights several hundred pounds. These cattle mats are also about 5/8" thick. Probably the same stuff. Just curious why you want that on the floor? Is it black like the cow mats?
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