Cutting Pavers

I would like to cut a ~6 inch (diameter) hole, in a 28 inch wide paver stone. The paver is 1 1/2 inch thick. I have a Tile Saw. What blade do I need?
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'Dave C[_3_ Wrote:

I don't think you'd want to use a tile saw to do that cut.
I think a far more practical way would be to mark the hole location on the paver, and then use a masonary bit to drill small holes through the paver along the periphery of the hole location. Keep drilling between holes until you have your holes about 1/2 inch or less apart. Now take a hammer and start bashing away at the material you want to remove. The paver should break between the holes you drilled, leaving you with a hole of the shape desired.
Obviously, the closer spaced the holes you drill are, the higher the liklihood that the material inside those holes will break free of the paver without the paver breaking.
--
nestork

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On Friday, September 12, 2014 1:34:33 PM UTC-4, nestork wrote:

paver is likely reinforced with wire mesh or even rebar........
might be easier to pour a paver with the hole already in it
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a 6 inch diameter abrasive edged hole saw would be best - run wet.
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On Friday, September 12, 2014 1:51:23 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I have a tile just like that left by the previous owner, surrounding a drain.
He cut the tile in 4 quarters and chopped off the points in the center. Looks odd but it works. I suspect it was an accident, that it snapped when he was trying to cut it, and he just made the best of it.
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|I would like to cut a ~6 inch (diameter) hole, in a 28 inch wide paver | stone. The paver is 1 1/2 inch thick. I have a Tile Saw. What blade do | I need?
One of the other ideas presented might be better for what you need, but if it's going to be covered (in other words, if you have some kind of flange on whatever is going throught the hole) then I think a carborundum blade on a circular saw might be easiest. You could cut a 6" square with that. I like the idea of a 6" abrasive hole saw, but it sounds very expensive for a single use.
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wrote:

Funny, I've never seen a paver with steel in it. Might be a regional thing. When I needed a 5" hole in a granite tile for a floor drain I went to a concrete cutting and coring outfit and they popped the hole through in a couple minutes with a diamond encrusted core drill. For the same price I could have rented an abrasive hole saw and a Kango and done it myself - possibly breaking a tile or two due to inexperience runng.
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On Friday, September 12, 2014 5:20:57 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

around pittsburgh concrete pavers with wire mesh are very common...
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On Fri, 12 Sep 2014 17:14:09 -0400, "Mayayana"

For single use - particularly if it is a red clay paver, I'd be tempted to run over to Lowes and grab a Kobalt 0322705 grit edged 6 3/8" ceiling latin saw for under $20. As I said earlier, run it wet. Put a dam of dum-dum or clay around the hole to keep about 1/4" of water and drive it with your 1/2" drill motor. Predrill the pilot with a carbaloy bit first. The rotating pilot drill will slow down the water loss through the pilot hole.
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