Cutting padlocks

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Seems to me that they have proven the old stories of giant squid. Definitely of a size that could easily take a man. Then there's the old Kraken stories.
Steve
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so you are saying that oceanologists were unable to ascertain the age of the sucker mark by the state of the wound?
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On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 18:13:40 -0800 (PST), Evan

And even new jaws will have one heck of a time getting through a good hardened shank
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I'll take a pic of mine and post on flickr with a measuring tape next to it.
Steve
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On 11/25/2011 7:34 PM, Robert Green wrote:

If you have AC power within reach, go with the angle grinder with a cut off wheel, it will have 100 times the torque of an air powered one from harbor freight and will cut through the lock like butter.
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On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 16:07:31 -0500, "Robert Green"

Air tools are smaller and lighter than electric tools. The power is back at the compressor. You do need air where you want to use them tho. I have air chucks all over the place and lots of hose.
One good thing if you are working around the water. Nobody got electrocuted with an air tool.
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wrote:

That makes sense. I suppose if you've got air compressors in the shop to begin with, they aren't much of a hassle. It probably makes a real difference in tools that you have to hold all day, like roofing nailers, because they are lighter.
-- Bobby G.
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On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 18:22:04 -0500, "Robert Green"

Air tools are addictive. Once you get a good compressor it is all you want to use. Nail guns are a drug all of their own. I have 5 now, from a big framing nailer down to a small brad gun.
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Agreed. Now, just the minimal auto repair requires the 3/8 air ratchet. And I would say cuts the work time in half. After you use a nailer or brad gun, one suddenly develops an allergy to them. What you can do in one fraction of one second with a nailer, and do it accurately is a drop of the addictive potion.
Steve
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wrote:

Yup, the first time you put up trim with a finish nailer you will never use a hammer again. Roofing your garage suddenly becomes a morning job, not all day misery when you buy a roof gun. A framing gun makes all of those tricky toe nailing tricks a piece of cake.
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Nailing cripples in place is my favorite. The ones you can't hit very straight on because of the adjoining stud and never get them straight or flush.
Steve
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wrote:

The 45 year old CP impact and Snap-on air ratchet both came in handy removing the battery bracket on the PT cruiser to get at the transmission oil leak this morning. There is NOTHING that is easy to reach, much less remove, under the hood of a PT.
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On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 17:18:45 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

And a lot less likely to ignite an explosive atmosphere.
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On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 17:18:45 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

But if you're not careful, you can get inflated.
That's the origin of inflation.
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They do the "work" for you?
Just a guess.
Steve
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On 11/25/2011 4:34 PM, Robert Green wrote:

about 10 seconds with a cutting torch. That's how I'd do it.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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news:FuadndEMQ4j73k3TnZ2dnUVZ_j-

Alas, I have no cutting torch. Even if I did, this particular lock is fitted around the end coupling of a Craftsmen rubber hose that's been out front for 20 years. Ever since TWO hoses got ripped off in a row from my house (I used to travel a lot and while the house was alarmed, the hose was not) I used two locks to secure it. One's a padlock, the other a cable lock and both secure the hose to the faucet and the hose has not grown legs since. Now the time has come for a replacement hose and if I damage it I suspect Sears might welch on their guarantee. You'd have to be a real pro to cut this lock with a torch without damaging the hose that fills nearly the entire inside of the shackle ring. I might even damage it with a grinder.
-- Bobby G.
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On 11/25/2011 6:34 PM, Robert Green wrote:

Probably too late and it isn't what you want to hear. I know about that angle grinder that is calling your name, I have had the same sort of thing happen to me.
But, the bolt cutter will probably work. If it won't cut the lock then you can always cut the hasp it is locked through, then replace the hasp.
Bill
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wrote:

There are lots of hardened hasps out there too - - - -.
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