Cutting old, delicate cast iron waste pipe

We need to tap into the waste pipe close to where it exits our basement in order to get enough elevation to reach a basement sink we are installing.
However, when we had the plumber come in, he noticed that the pipe appears to have some hairline cracks and rusting flakes. The plumber is afraid that if he cuts in to the existing pipe to put in a "T", he may crack the whole pipe including the adjacent part that runs through the foundation. Needless to say, this would be a b--ch to repair.
Any way to "strengthen" or brace the pipe so that he can cut into it more safely?
Would putting generous amounts of JB Weld around any of the cracked areas be sufficient? (probably not, I imagine)
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First of all if there are if it's that bad it should be replaced. A conventional snap cutter will put allot of force on the pipe. So you might be better off with a small grinder and some cut off wheels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It would be a major mistake to not replace this cast iron, if the problems with it are so apparent. A no-brainer.
bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The problem is that the bad section extends through an 18 inch 100 year old stone foundation about 8 feet underground with only the last 24 inches or so inside the house. Presumably replacing the pipe would require tunneling through the foundation and deep beneath the yard. My plumber is concerned that even cutting into the next section of pipe could disturb this older, corroded section.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I concur with the cut-off wheel suggestion. Traditional back and forth hacksaw action from a sawzall type saw would vibrate and jostle that thing to bits...
The thinnest cutoff wheel possible (small kerf) would be the best. Maybe even a dremmel type cutter with a LOT of patience..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
let the next guy worry about it, right?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
unfortunately, most folks "fix it" that way.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ever cut cast iron with a sawzall. Buy a case of blades and bring a pillow
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
blueman wrote:

so... even tho you know its bad, and in dire need of replacement, you have no intention of fixing it? How's you car? do you maintain it the same way? Sheesh! Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

terms, then when after it fails and floods your basement with sewage, or fails out in the yard and contaminates your ground water. (even if you don't have a well, a neigbor might.) A common solution in situations like this is to abandon the old line in place, after disconnecting the street end, and capping or mudding over the basement end, and simply running a new line, which can be done with a skinny trench, or in some cases via a 'no trench' method, at least where it runs under patios and driveways and such.
Yes, maintaining a house is sometimes an expensive PITA, especially an older house like this. But it is false economy to put off needed repairs. And if you should decide to sell in the next ten years or so, a fresh modern sewer line would be a big selling point to anyone who has ever had a sewer line fail. If it had ever happened to you, you would strongly want to never go through that again.
aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't fix what ain't broke.
They make a chain snap cutter. You need an old plumber to operate it however. He can snap the cast iror exactly where he wants to and add a rubber transition to new pvc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 07 Oct 2005 19:33:50 GMT, "Sacramento Dave"

An old plumber knows how to NOT do that. But he has shattered a lot of pipe in the learning process while he is a young plumber.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Something to keep in mind is that if you can see that the pipe is cracked, etc, so will an inspector if you were to sell the place. Like another poster said, you could probably run a parallel lateral, and at least have be able to use your plumbing while this is going on. The actual connections at each end would only take an hour or so. If your old pipe were to break, you'll be out of your house for days.
bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.