Cutting hole in INCREDIBLY HARD ceramic tile

Okay, I've built several bathrooms already... I've used the cheap, thin Home Dumpo tiles and easily cut through them with my Dremel-style carbide bit attachment. It makes a nice hole for water pipes, etc. Now, I have the hardest ceramic tile I've ever seen in my life. This 3/8"+ thick ceramic tile is virtually impervious to all known mortal methods of drill bits! I can cut it with my wet saw, but no form of bit makes even the SLIGHTEST mark in it! You know what I have to accomplish -- I need to make a hole (2" or so) to fit the drain piping through it... tub downspout, shower body, etc. Unfortunately, these are 12x12 tiles where the holes are in the center of the tile... I cannot cut two half-moon holes in two tiles with the wet saw. So, how to accomplish this task? ALL my carbide bits were smoked in very short order with NO progress AT ALL. None. It smoked every bit and you can't even notice a notch in the tile. I've purchased diamond tipped core drill bits, but even if that works, how do I continue making the 2" circle? I fear that a cermic bladed jigsaw will die as well! Can anyone recommend a bit/blade/whatever tool for cutting the toughest ceramic tile ever known to mankind? Surely, this is done everday by master tile workers, right?? This isn't miracle tile, by the way... it's just good, thick, heavy ceramic tile purchased at our local tile showroom store for floors and walls. Thanks!
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GeekBoy wrote:

HD has carbide or diamond dust hole saws just for making holes in tile. They work wonders. Best done in a drill press.
Jim
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You need a diamond or carbide hole saw
http://www.mytoolstore.com/starrett/hole004.html#grit
is the carbide grit one the diamond one is 3x the cost if you are just going to do a few the grit one should work ok Best don on a drill press but you could make a jig outside too. make sure you have a good drill as both bits say they work best at HIGH speed. They don't mention but they probably work best wet. You don't need to soak it though. If you have one of those pump up misters it should work fine!
Wayne

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Thanks to the both of you who responded. Last time I went to HD for bits and blades, they failed me terribly... I don't think I can trust them again! Anyway, I don't have a drill press, but I do have a fat 18v Dewalt with that side-arm attachment. I'll setup a little clamp jig and see what I can do. I'll probably slip all over the tile though. The picture in that link you sent doesn't seem to show a center drill bit sticking through, like a regular hole saw drill attachment. So, that means I can't keep the drill from slipping by using a center punch. Any recomendation on how I can keep it from slipping around if I don't have a drill press? Lastly, I like that website you posted and want to get a few sizes. Since I only have one last bathroom to build, I'll probably get the carbide ones. My question is -- what size(s) do I need for: - Tub downspout - Shower spout - Shower body hot/cold adjuster Are all these 2" holes? I think I recall that the shower body adjuster was larger. Thanks again and I'll let you know how it goes when everything is finally delivered and I start drilling!
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have you tried a rotozip type bit?
randy

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I use a 4" angle grinder with a dry cut diamond blade. Cut through the back of the tile and you'll be in business.
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