Cutting Corrugated Roofing Panels (metal)

I need to cut some corrugated roofing panels, the metal kind one obtains at Lowes / HomeDepot. The cuts consist of a single cut running across the entire width of a panel, as in trying to cut a 12' long panel into two 6' panels.
what tool / blade combination will achieve good results?
Rob
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metal cutting blade in a jigsaw will work fine. Good pair of tin shears will work (which is what I see roofer using a lot).

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Rob Jones wrote:

A circular saw with an abrasive metal cutting blade.
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Robert Allison
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I have used both techniques, jigsaw and metal cutting blade, but found that the metal cutting blade leaves a very sharp edge on the metal which should be filed or ground off before handling it. Easy to cut your fingers otherwise.

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wrote:

I agree with this and also you will eat one blade for almost every cut. Not to mention the noise is horrible and the sparks burn your hands and clothing unless you cover everything in fireproof material.
I am a farmer, I use this tin all the time. I have tried all sorts of shortcuts, and still find that a common metal shears works the best. The trick is to stand on the edge of the large piece while you cut. and pull upward on the other. It sounds like you are cutting two equal pieces. Still lift the one to your left, stand on the piece on the right and cut with your right hand *assuming you are right handed***. There are always little sharp burrs, be careful, and unless you wear heavy gloves, which to me is too hard to work with them on, you WILL get cut at least once per job, even if you are experienced. Keep bandaids on hand.
Cutting is not as hard as it seems once you get the hang of it.
To make vertical cuts on a sheet, I have a special electric tool that turns out a 1/4" roll of steel and separates the sheet. Otherwise, use the shears for that too.
Mark
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Circular saw, combo blade installed backwards. Cut it like butter!!
I need to cut some corrugated roofing panels, the metal kind one obtains at Lowes / HomeDepot. The cuts consist of a single cut running across the entire width of a panel, as in trying to cut a 12' long panel into two 6' panels.
what tool / blade combination will achieve good results?
Rob
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I've heard that before. Have you actually done this? If so, would I be Ok in using an el-cheapo blade from HarborFreight???
rob
On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 20:03:12 GMT, "chillermfg"

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Rob Jones wrote:

You can use this method to cut sheet metal, but do NOT use a carbide tipped blade! The tips fly off rather quickly and can cause the same type of damage as shrapnel. Use a standard combination blade.

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Built a covered porch swing / arbor / patio / deck with the corrugated metal roof. Used the Skil circular saw with reversed combo blade. So yes, I have done it and sure the Harbor blade will work.

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On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 13:38:49 -0700, Rob Jones

I have done it. It is loud, hurts your ears, and leaves a jagged edge. Shears are so much easier and make a much nicer job. If you MUST use a circular saw with reversed blade, use an el cheapo plywood cutting blade. Not a coarse blade.
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