Cutting cast iron bath tub with circular saw

Page 2 of 2  
Andrew Sarangan wrote:

Did it dent at all? If so, the tub is steel, not cast iron. Cast iron breaks, steel won't.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dadiOH wrote:

iron
It did not dent, but there were small chips were it was struck. I didn't feel that those chips were large enough to cause a crack.
Can I tell from the color whether it is steel? It is a dull grey metal.
Also, I did manage to cut tub using a metal cutting circular saw. I did not get very far, but it did no feel like steel to me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is still sounding like a cast iron tub. A full swing on the outside of the tub with an eight pound or greater sledge hammer should shatter it. This thing is going to break more like a piece of glass than a piece of concrete. It is not going to develop little cracks that you keep hitting. Same stuff as a cast iron skillet.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't know what you guys are talking about. I whacked it with a pick axe. Many blows at maximum strength. It made several small dents on the surface, and even made a through hole about 1/4" diameter. But no major cracks. The only thing that broke was the tip of my pick axe. I am pretty certain that this is not a steel tub. I am hitting it along the outside surface, which allows me to get a full swing on the axe. I can't hit it from the inside surface bacause I can't get a full swing inside the bathtub. Obviously I am doing something wrong, but I can't figure out what.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Let's clarify here. A pick like I used is an old one, quite heavy, and has a pointed end on one side, a chisel tip on the other. Mine weighs about 12 pounds without the handle.
It is NOT a pick axe, which is like the tool firemen use.
A SERIOUS pick would not have been able to have its point bent by what you were doing.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OK, thanks. I used a bigger sledge hammer and got some pieces to come off. But I am surprised by the large amount of force required. I am still puzzled how I am going to break the bottom of the bathtub. If I pound on it vertically, I am afraid I might break the floor underneath it. I don't want the whole house collapsing around me :-) Any ideas?
Michael Baugh wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@myrealbox.com wrote:

underneath
When (if?) you get the sides busted up, you should be able to stand the bottom up to lean it against something or just carry it out of the house. Two people ought to be able to carry out just the bottom easily.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks everyone for your help. The trick was to use an 8lb sledge hammer. I am sure a heavy pick axe would have worked too. I was using a much lighter tool. It took about 30 minutes to reduce the bathtub to pieces. It was definitely cast iron, no doubts about it. Now I have to deal with how to get rid of the pieces.
Next problem is how to move the new bathtub into place. The wall-to-wall spacing is 60", just the width of the new bathtub. How do I maneuver the tab into place? I was thinking of tilting it against the wall and lowering it into place. But then it occured to me that the tilted length will be longer than 60" if it is a square bottom. If it is a tapered bottom, then it may be ok. Any ideas?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I suppose all things are possible, but I bet you end up taking out or cutting and splicing a couple of studs on one end or the other.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1. Measure the door. In many bathrooms, especially older ones, door is too narrow to get tub in w/o de-installing door all the way to rough opening, and sometimes even then. Bathroom is built around tub, often including having to pull a couple studs during framing to make a hole big enough. And if you have a skinny hallway or stairs, they can also be roadblocks.
2. Look at tub out in the garage or driveway, and figure out where the 'legs' are that hold the weight. There may be a template on the box it came in. Now go look at the gaping hole in bathroom, and figure out where the weight is going to rest. Is it solid (right over a joist), or is it just plywood, or even a hole there? Add blocking, etc, as appropriate. At the same time, double check to make sure the drain stub and such are in the right place. (it would really suck to drop tub in, and drain is an inch off...) Tub needs a strong and level place to sit. Is new tub cast iron? If not, it may need a puddle of mortar or something to bed in, to feel solid. The box should say.
3. With some tubs, you can add a 2x2 rail to studs to stiffen the tub flange and catch some of the weight. Again, it has to be level. Blocking between studs to catch wall edge, provide something to fasten lip to, and stiffen wall, is also a good idea. Good time to insulate wall behind tub, for sound or temp control, especially if it is on an outside wall.
4. As to dropping it in place- you basically want it flat on floor in front of opening, and slide straight back. Maybe pick up on back edge a little, to drop it tight against wall. This is one of those things that there is no easy way to do it, especially if it is heavy cast iron. Even with steel or plastic, a lot easier with 2 big strong guys with long arms. Go slow and discuss each move- don't want fingers beween tub and a hard place.
5. Be careful not to chip it as you place it or fasten it to wall, and use the cardboard cutout on box to make protective shield for flange and tub bottom. If you drop wrench or whatever later, and it chips the porcelain, you will cuss and cry.
HTH.
aem sends....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andrew Sarangan wrote:

Still another point in favor of showers over tubs. :)
--
dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
it sounds like you have a steel tub, since it dented rather than shattered
--

Mikey S.
http://www.mike721.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.