Cutting a 4x4

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The plans for a garden bench at (www.handymanwire.com/articles/gardenbenchplans.html) call for 15 degree cuts, 30 degree cuts of 4x4's, and 1.75" cuts to join the 4x4 legs.
My skill saw only cuts to a depth of 1.5 inches. I do not have a table saw and I am completely out of storage space,
Is buying a hand saw my only way out of this? If it is, What kind of saw should I get?
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On Sep 5, 2:20 pm, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote:

Look for a tool rental type place in your area...
RENT a larger circular saw...
~~ Evan
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On Sep 5, 11:20 am, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote:

How many 4x4's do you have? Can you transport them to a lumber yard and pay them to make the cuts? Wouldn't be much $$.
HB
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If its just a couple of pieces I will grab my bow saw. Its cheap if you dont have one , quick as hand tools go and good exercise. Also as another poster said take it to where you bought it and get it cut, local mom and po place will do it for free but I wouldnt count of finding that. Usually not too expensive though. I have a radial arm saw that would make easy work of a project like yours but still often get it cut in the store especially if I can get it done for free.
Jimmie
Jimmie
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wrote:

turn the stud over and make a second cut?
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On 9/5/2011 2:54 PM, Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:

A pre-1950 or so carpenter would call you a wimp. For a one-time project, build some simple jigs out of scrap, and use a sharp handsaw. They must still sell them somewhere. I remember as a kid seeing one of my old man's crews frame a house all the way to getting the roof deck under tar paper, before the electric service finally showed up. (This was kinda out in the boonies, and only rich people had generators back then.) They barely whined about it, and acted like it was no big deal. They did seem to take more time planning their cuts, though.
--
aem sends...


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wrote:

A good hand saw that is properly sharpened and has the tooth pitch set right will go through a 4x4 in about 10 seconds. It has been so long since anyone actually "saw" one that they forget. I am old enough to remember when they didn't use skil saws. BTW there are cross cut saws and rip saws. If you are having trouble, you may be using the wrong saw. (the tooth pitch is different) That rusty old relic you bought in a garage sale or found in the back of the garage will take forever to cut anything and finding a guy who can sharpen it may be impossible.
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too many, but then again if you did turn it over and cut it again, using a handsaw would be a lot easier
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Friends, neighbors, co-workers have a 12" miter saw you can borrow or have them make the cuts? If so, cut to rough length and mark the cuts ahead of time.
Or I'd find plans for a bench with smaller legs. Mine uses 2 x 2 and no miters.
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On 9/5/2011 2:20 PM, Dick Adams wrote:

There must be a bazillion outdoor bench plans on the net that don't use 4x4 lumber.
IMO, the bench design at www.handymanwire.com/articles/gardenbenchplans.html sucks anyway.
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Made me look...
I agree. The 4x4s are oversize and all those bolts sticking out are ugly. At least recess them.
Seems to me, one of the best things about doing things yourself is using the money saved to buy new tools. It's a feed back loop, new tools, better results, then more projects.
--
Dan Espen

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I built the Tudor bench shown here http://www.americanfurnituredsgn.com/adironda.htm
Go down the page a bit to see mine. I made two. 8th down on the left http://www.americanfurnituredsgn.com/Gallery%20of%20Customer%20Projects.html
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On 9/5/2011 9:35 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Excellent job Ed!
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Thanks. I build one for myself first. The next year I build another for a friend. Both are from cypress. Not only does it look good, it is comfortable to sit on. The arm rests are wide enough to hold a drink or a dish to eat if you are having a cookout.
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The cheapest solution is a longer blade for your Skillsaw.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Don Phillipson wrote:

Yeah that works well. Put a 12" blade on a 7" saw, duh!
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Harbor Freight has an adapter for just about everything.
Steve ;-)
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On 9/5/2011 1:20 PM, Dick Adams wrote:

when working with 4x4's and larger, a small chainsaw with a nice sharp chain can work wonders.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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A standard 7 1/4" circular saw will cut considerably deeper than 1.5" That said, a good or even a cheap handsaw is very useful. There are some reasonably priced saws at any home center or hardware store. If you can find a sharpener, yardsales and flea markets are good for picking up an old Disston or similar quality saw. Another option would be a recipricating saw, also a very versatile tool for any DIY minded homeowner.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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On Sep 5, 9:17 pm, snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

You are assuming that the OP does in fact have a standard circular saw and not one of the smaller battery operated toy saws that came bundled with a cordless drill...
~~ Evan
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