cutting 6 x 6 beams with miter saw ???

Page 1 of 3  
Will a 12 inch, non-reciprocating miter saw cut 6 x 6 beams in one pass ??? I know it would be close, but I would like to hear from someone who has done it. Again, can it cut in one pass, so as to get a perfectly smooth cut ?
Thanks !!
James
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's going to depend on the saw. I would doubt it for most of them. It's not that difficult to get a decent cut in two passes if the saw is set up square. I can get pretty durn close with a hand circular saw if I take my time. Besides you're working with a 6x6 which is by no means going to be perfect in any other direction.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No. First off, a miter saw does not reciprocate, it rotates, and no saw provides a perfectly smooth cut unless you have a rather loose definition of perfectly.
Make a miter box out of some scrap plywood and use a plain old vanilla hand saw, and clean it up with a sharp hand plane. It won't kill you, you won't mess up the beam, and it's good exercise.
R
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's true but a 6x6 is not 6x6 either.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 6, 5:21 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

If it was a choice between top posting and you smoking, I think you'd get a lot of votes for you smoking.
R
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/6/2011 9:47 AM, James wrote:

I can't imagine how ANY 12" blade would cut a 5 1/2 or 6" cut. If you have a washer holding the blade on, the very MOST you could ever get is 5 1/2" and that is if you could cut all the way to the washer and that's not likely.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you mean a non-sliding miter saw?
I've never heard of a reciprocating miter saw, so I'm pretty confident in stating that *all* miter saws are non-reciprocating.
In fact, a reciprocating miter saw sounds really scary!
Besides, you'd be amazed at what a belt sander can do to clean up any ridges left from a cut made from multiple sides.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the nice replies.... I made a mistake in using the word non-reciprocating... I meant non-sliding.... one chap caught that....
What is the next size, after 12 inch ? Does it go to 14, or larger ?
BTW, will be cutting dozens of 6 x 6 beams, so could cut down on work if we had a saw that can cut in one pass.
Am building outside steps on a slope, in the mountains. Will build "squares" out of beams, and stake them in the ground with rebar. Will nail beam squares together wtih 10 inch galvanized spiral nails. For the project, it will require a lot of drilling. Thinking about buying a basic drill press to drill pilot holes first.
James
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you building stairs out of them then the cut quality is not that important. Use a chain saw.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you sure 10 inch nails are long enough?
You might want to consider re-bar. Probably cheaper and can be cut to lengths that can go through multiple beams and into the ground.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oren, I cannot decipher what this sentence means ??? Can you rephrase it please ? I would like to know the point you are making...
thanks again to all replies !!
James
----------------------------
Not a task where cuts and bore holes have to be "perfect".
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok, see your points now Oren, thanks !!
James
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If that is the use, you are way overengineering it. That is not a "finish" type cut - use a chainsaw.
Harry K
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I forgot the second part - drilling the hole.
Again, drill press accuracy is not required. A 3/8 or 1/2' drill and "speed bore" spade dills are the route to go. I've BTDT.
Harry K
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harry, I will not use a chainsaw, because as I said, I have seen steps cut with a chainsaw and I don't like the look. Perhaps most folks would, but I don't, and my project will look better when it is completed.
And, the purpose of the drill press has nothing to do with drill accuracy... it has to do with speed and manpower. I have MANY steps thurs many holes to drill for these steps.... I think that drilling perhaps 400-500 holes ten inches deep, would justify "considering" a drill press.
James
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James, I am not aware of any drill press capable of 10" quill stroke. I think you will definitely be in the portable drill market. The big decision will be whether to work with a ship auger or speed bores with extension.
You might consider using a reciprocating saw for the timber cuts if you do not find a chainsaw acceptable.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DanG
Keep the whole world singing . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/7/2011 8:53 AM, DanG wrote:

Agreed. He is making this WAY more complicated than it needs to be. Even if he had a giant chop saw and wide-mouth drill press, I suspect that after hoisting and supporting the first half-dozen timbers to cut and drill them, he would be looking for another solution. An electrician's drill with and auger or long spade bit, and a small chainsaw, is what we used back in the stone age. A speed square and an old screwdriver, to scribe the cut lines, helps. Fit one end, mark the other end, shove a brick under it to keep the blade out of the dirt, and cut. Once timber is in place, drill the slightly undersize hole through the first timber into the second, and pound in the rebar peg with a BFH.
Only time we did fancy smooth cuts and used threaded rod or bolts, was for the pretty stuff up on the deck, which wasn't made from landscape timbers.
Yes, a Sawzall or clone would work and produce a prettier cut, but it would be a lot slower than a chainsaw. (The framing crews decking out the roofs on the apartments I worked on as a kid, used a chainsaw to cut off the wild ends on the decking. 3 stories up, strolling along with no safety harness. Those guys were all young and immortal, but I never saw one fall.)
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What you need is a Milwaukee Hole Hawg and a ship auger of the appropriate size. Unfortunately, Milwaukee self feed bits don't come is the smaller sizes you need. Look over the bits and such in the section of plumbers and electricians specialties at your box store.
Joe
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think you're assuming a couple of things about chainsaws and their use that are affecting your opinion. I have seen tile jobs that sucked - doesn't mean that I think all tile jobs suck. Most people are not looking for joinery-quality cuts when they whip out a chainsaw. They're looking for down and dirty, and probably have a worn chain, so it's no surprise that what you saw was down and dirty - yours doesn't have to be. Invest the money in the correct tool. http://www.timbertools.com/Products/LignaTool-chain-saw-guide.html or, if you want slower so you can enjoy the experience on the hillside for longer (Amazon.com product link shortened)
BTW, you are simply kidding yourself about the cut ends of the ties. Unless you're popping for the $ for cedar, you're going to be getting PT 6x6s and they'll have splits, checks, and big knots. Even if your cuts were perfect the whole job would still look like it was made from lumber with splits, checks, and big knots. You're mentally gilding the lily before you start which is a perfect recipe for a big letdown. I advise you to adjust your thinking.

Again - you're simply kidding yourself. Lugging a drill press up and down and on top of whatever needs to be drilled is pointless in your application. The ties are drilled in place and you don't need a perfectly perpendicular hole, you need a straight hole that's relatively perpendicular. Any heavy duty D-handled 1/2" drill will do the job. Use an extension for the drill bit so you don't have to bend over to drill the holes. The weight of the drill will feed the bit - you just have to keep it from rotating.
I still think you should do it with hand tools. They build moral fiber. :)
R
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/7/2011 6:25 AM, James wrote:

and a gas powered drill.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.