Custom wood door frame


I have an exterior door, well actually it's not an exterior door that opens to the interior, but an exterior door that opens into a courtyard, so basically it's exposed to the weather on both sides.
It is a custom wood door, odd size. It is difficult to replace because it has a lot of accessories on it. It has a built in mail slot with a mail box attached to the inside. It has custom hinges with pins to avoid the doors being removed by simply unhinging the hinges. It also has brackets on the top and bottom to fit two slabs of 2x6 lumber for hurricane braces, and it has the top and bottom spring loaded rods to attach the door to the floor and top frame, plus several mortise locks. Bottom line is it will be very difficult and expensive to replace and rebuild it.
The problem is the bottom of this door is too long, it can open half way and it will be stucked due to the uneveness of the mexican tiled floor. I attempted to remove the door and cut it shorter and attach a metal door bottom (something like this http://www.thehardwarehut.com/catalog-product.php?p_ref%543 ).
However I just noticed due to the door bottom having direct contact with the floor for 36 years, the bottom of that door is basically rotted a bit - it's mushy.
I think the least expensive approach is for me to remove the bottom part of the wood door frame, and replace it. However, I cannot find suitable lumber. The door is 1-3/4" thick, which is thicker than the typical 2x4s. Is there any source for lumber with "standard door thickness"?
Thanks,
MC
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how much did you cut off and what tools do you have? you can turn a 2x4 on it's side to get 3.5" thick, then rip that down with a table saw.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

...
I see no logical reason whatever for the weather seal in such an application; definitely dump it.
Picture of the door and sill/frame would have been far more useful.
First, what is the wood used originally? Matching would be a good thing (tm), more than likely.
In that area I'd guess cypress would have been a likely choice--you can get lumber from hardwood/"real" lumber yards but not the Borgs.
If treated were acceptable for the appearance, you can always start w/ a larger piece and cut it down, of course -- do you know what the actual dimensions of the existing sill are?
I'd also look into treating the door w/ one of the rot stabilizing epoxy products but a specific product/treatment would depend on more specific information about the door than you've provided.
In the end, though, if the door is too long it should be trimmed so it doesn't drag. As noted before, I can't imagine why there would be any disadvantage to there being an inch or so gap at the bottom in that application.
-- In that area you'll definitely
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I need to have some sort of a weather strip because the entire courtyard is screened in so no mosquitoes and no-see-ums will not come through. Yes, otherwise I could live with the gap.
Door is painted so finish is not a problem I will have to repaint the entire door anyways.
Thanks,
MC
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote: ...

Does (or would it ok if?) the door only opened inward?
If so, I'd make the barrier a hanging one I think on the inside rather than the mating strip that can't help but get wet (and stay wet a long time) in that climate.
--
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Ask around at work or your neighbors for anyone that does woodworking either as a sideline or a hobby. They can make a piece to fit from 8/4 stock planed down to proper thickness. Some lumberyards that bill themselves as "lumber and millwork" can do it also.
I'd cut it back as far as needed to get rig of the rot and glue and screw the new piece in place. If painted it can be made pretty much invisible.
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