Curb repair

I've got an 8" wide x 3" deep piece of curb that spalled off after being struck by a plow. Do you think that a little mortar will hold it in place? I tried silicone caulk last year with pretty poor results. TIA
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C & M wrote:

12 minute epoxy or polyurethane construction adhesive.
R
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Is the curb even yours? Making repairs on public property might be more trouble than it is worth.
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Is this curb on public property? If so, send an e mail or registered letter stating that there is an "imminent danger" of someone falling, and you will get fast repairs. If someone DOES break an ankle on it, you have the proof you notified them before the accident.
If it is yours, follow other poster's suggestions.
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SteveB wrote:

I'm not sure why some people are assuming that the curb in question is not on the OP's property or that he needs persmission to try to repair it. If it is his driveway he can obviously do whatever he wants. If it is the curb at the street and he doesn't "own" it, he still has a vested interest in it as it impacts the appearance of his property.
I fail to see the reason to notify any authority for gluing back a chipped off piece of curb smaller than a paperback book. If anything, he should send them a bill after it's done.
R
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SIKA construction adhesive & masking tape (the tape holds the chunk in place while the adhesive cures)
cheers Bob
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wrote in message

You obviously are ignorant of how things work. IF the curb is public property, one can be actually cited for making repairs. We hired a private contractor to cut out 59'11" of curb and put an access driveway onto our property in our cul-de-sac. (They are limited to 60' before you have to get all sorts of variances, etc.) A public works inspector had to come out and sign the permit. If you do it by the book, it can be an easy thing. If you don't, it might just come back and bite you where you least expect it. Such as: the city/county coming out and fixing it and sending you a bill for "messing it up" in the first place with "unauthorized repairs."
Do what you want. Do what you think. Do what you will. But it just MIGHT be a good idea first to establish whose property EXACTLY it is that one is working on.
Let's hear from the OP as to whether or not this is HIS property, or PUBLIC property.
One small detail the OP left out is the lynchpin.
Steve
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Ask at the hardware, I think there is white epoxy made for this.
--

Christopher A. Young
Do good work.
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Many thanks to all. It *is* my curb and my problem.
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C & E wrote:

You still might be able to get the city to fix it. They usually don't know shit.
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