cultured marble repair

We have a cultured marble sink with a couple of hairline cracks radiating out from the outlet, less than half an inch in length.
There is no leakage, and the cracks don't appear on the bottom of the sink, so I think this is just a cosmetic problem, but I would like to fix it.
I've read that polymer resin can be used for this purpose, but I think these cracks, being hairline width, are too tight for resin to get into the cracks, which makes me think I should widen the cracks before applying the resin, which I'm not real eager to do lest I make a small problem into a big one.
Is there a very thin, watery resin that would sink into a hairline crack, or a proven technique to solve this problem, or should I just keep ignoring it?
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I would use a simple epoxy, push it into the cracks with the bowl of an old spoon, and then wire off all excess immediately.
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On 1/17/2011 10:57 AM, Notat Home wrote:

Depends on the polymer. If acrylic, there are kits that will even give you a color match. Ones I'm familiar with but don't know how they are retailed are used for Corian and there may be information at the DuPont or Corian web site. I think they also sell a cultured marble. They consist of an acrylic monomer/polymer/color mix as one part and second part curing agent.
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Notat Home wrote:

you can get a water thin epoxy, used for this application. try a place that sells granite slabs. i've used http://www.defusco.com/ for granite tools and such. good prices and excellant service (no affiliation, yada).
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The lowest viscosity cements in the market are the cyanoacrylates (Crazy Glue, similar). They will be compatible with the casting resin of your sink and should flow into the crack better than any other resins. Various viscosities are on the market now, especially 3M for example.
Joe
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