Cuisinart wine cellar

Does anyone know how this works please? Mine seems to work but I am trying to figure out whether it is a huge power hog. (I am in an area where KWH ra tes have just jumped by what seems to be about 200%) Cuisinart says it use s 75-95 watts, which (unless it is using more because it isnt working prope rly, see below about the fan being constantly on) sounds pretty bad in an e ra where everyone is replacing 100 watt bulbs with 15 watt ones.
My unit blows an audible fan constantly at all hours of the day and night, so it seems to blow air inside and measure the temperature inside which res ults? I seem to remember the market was flooded a few years ago with cute looking 1950s-design fridges about a foot high, touted as "coolers" which w orked just by blowing air in the interior. i.e. they didnt work at all.
Cuisinart says it works by 'measuring the differential voltage inside and o utside' whatever that means?? Users report that condensation collects insid e the unit and if not collected spills onto the floor but Cuisinart confirm s that it doesnt have any compressor in it! But it seems to maintain [in W inter] a pretty constant 8 degree setting on the expensive-looking thermome ter at the front. So I am trying to work out how it works?
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Does anyone know how this works please? Mine seems to work but I am trying to figure out whether it is a huge power hog. (I am in an area where KWH rates have just jumped by what seems to be about 200%) Cuisinart says it uses 75-95 watts, which (unless it is using more because it isnt working properly, see below about the fan being constantly on) sounds pretty bad in an era where everyone is replacing 100 watt bulbs with 15 watt ones.
My unit blows an audible fan constantly at all hours of the day and night, so it seems to blow air inside and measure the temperature inside which results? I seem to remember the market was flooded a few years ago with cute looking 1950s-design fridges about a foot high, touted as "coolers" which worked just by blowing air in the interior. i.e. they didnt work at all.
Cuisinart says it works by 'measuring the differential voltage inside and outside' whatever that means?? Users report that condensation collects inside the unit and if not collected spills onto the floor but Cuisinart confirms that it doesnt have any compressor in it! But it seems to maintain [in Winter] a pretty constant 8 degree setting on the expensive-looking thermometer at the front. So I am trying to work out how it works?

I am not sure about your cellar, but it could use a device like this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermoelectric_cooling
A special simiconductor that puts out heat on one side and cold on the other so to speak.
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On Tuesday, March 4, 2014 3:30:37 PM UTC-5, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Given that whole refrigerator/freezers today use less than $100 a year, it's very likely not a power hog. The 75 - 95W is when it's actually cooling, not just sitting there. Every appliance I've seen like that today has an energy sticker that gives an idea of how much energy it uses. And if you really want to know, buy a Kill-a-Watt meter for $25. You can plug that in between the cooler and the outlet and it will monitor it's usage. You can even enter the cost of electric per kwh and it will tell you how much the appiance is using by the hour, day, month, etc.
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So if I haven't felt the heat coming out of the heat exchanger, that is my fault, the fan may well need to stay on constantly and this unit is unlikely to use too much power, even if it does stay on a bit?
OK I feel slightly better now, even if I don't understand why the fan is constant
Thanks guys!
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On Tue, 04 Mar 2014 13:30:37 -0700, Ralph Mowery

I think the 'efficiency' of converting current flow into temperature differential is called Seebeck Coefficient. Solid State Refrigerator, or such.
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I was trying to read reviews. Not sure about fan. A thermoelectric unit is not as efficient as a compressor, but still uses rather low amount of power because it's fairly small. Collecting condensate is a necessary evil. A good design would let it go somewhere. Seems the floor in your case.
Greg
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s

er

That was what threw me: EVERYONE gives this unit bad reviews for reliabilit y and quite a few users report multiple unit replacements! The very few 'g ood' reviews are so non-detailed that they give the impression they are eit her fake or the users are oblivious of the fact that their units arent work ing properly. Or they are VERY LUCKY INDEED within the context of a manufac turer who cant afford to carry on replacing bad units.
That was one of the primary reasons for my posting here: This unit both doe s seem to be working AND doesnt seem to be forming condensate on the floor of the unit!
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wrote:

The most energy friendly wine cellar is to place your wine in a giant box, or boxes, lined with two overlapping layers, up to 1 1/2 to 2 inches thick, of styrofoam blocks. [you can buy sheets of this stuff to cut into 'exact size' blocks]. Simply water base glue the blocks along the inside and the inside of the lid. for complete interior coverage.
The thermal mass of the wine prevents temperature shock, and even though the temp average may be higher than a limestone cave - IT WILL BE CONSTANT.
Enjoy your $$ savings with a sip of delicious, well-stored wine.
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On Wednesday, March 5, 2014 9:51:28 AM UTC-5, Robert Macy wrote:

Whether it's even close to being constant would seem to depend on the temps were the insulated box is placed. If you go away for vacation for a week in winter and set the heat back to 45, it's not going to be too long before it's 45. And if you go away in summer and set it to 85, it's not going to be too long before it's 85.
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On Wed, 05 Mar 2014 12:13:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net

'constant', just as in calling a voltage, DC, is arbitrary, depends on your time frame reference.
Your wine can take room temp, just ages a bit faster. Damage to the flavour is mainly done by 'abrupt' temperature changes. Everyone knows to let wine 'rest' 2-6 months after purchase. Make certain the temps change very slowly, and voila! great flavoured wines.
For white wine, add a drop of citren(sp?). fresh lemon juice, from a slice. One, max two drops, else you have lemonade.
Take a glass of white wine, taste. Add one drop, taste again. let me know what you think.
I've had $20 bottles taste like $100 bottles from doing that. In a pinch, lime juice works. But MUST be juice, no messing around with that acidic sugar water sold as lemon juice. It's not just the acid that shifts the flavour, but some other chemical in real juice.
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On 3/6/2014 6:04 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

Never heard of that but I'll give it a try.
Red wines are best decanted about an hour before serving. I always pour out a sip to try, but it is smoother later.
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