CU-Al range hookup question

In the course of kitchen remodeling, when I pulled the range away from the wall, there was an electrical box lying on the floor (unfastened), with the wire from the service coming up through the floor going in, and enclosed in a flexible conduit, the wires carrying power to the stove. Yep, Cu-Al connectors in the box. Well rather than the current setup, I'd like to use something more standard; a wall socket for the range. How about just mounting that box with the CuAl connectors to a joist underneath the kitchen, then coming up to a socket with copper?
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Have you priced large copper wire lately? There's nothing wrong with (8 gauge and larger) aluminum wire and cable. It was the small stuff that caused problems in the 70's. Fasten the box to the wall or floor and you'll feel better.
Best regards, Bob
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The required method is to have a receptacle behind the stove with a range cord plugged into it. If the existing box is big enough, such as a 4" square x 21/8" deep or a 411/16" square x 21/8" deep, then you can mount it low and install a range receptacle with a square surface cover. The other choice is to remove the cable feed from the existing box and bring it into a surface mount range receptacle. Of course either method will require the installation of a range cord on the stove. Depending on your feed wire the receptacle and range cord can be 3 wire or 4 wire. The new range receptacles are usually rated for copper and aluminum connections, but with aluminum wire the use of Penetrox is a good practice. There is no reason to remount the junction box underneath the kitchen. That would just be more splices that could cause a problem down the road.
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John Grabowski wrote:

Why does there have to be a plug & socket? It's not accessible, so it doesn't serve as a means of disconnect. I would make sure the connections are clean and tight, and leave it alone.
Bob
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zxcvbob wrote:

For convenience?
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Aluminum cable and flexible conduit are not suitable for use as a portable cord. When the range is pulled out for cleaning or servicing the aluminum will bend each time as will the flex. Some ranges have access to the rear by the removal of the bottom drawer or panel. That access satisfies the requirement for a disconnect using a receptacle and cord.
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John Grabowski wrote:

wall. Brain cramps. Aluminum feed is 3-wire, They bonded ground and neutral in the box; 3-wire in; 4-wire out. .
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Got a surface mount 3-prong plug marked Cu-Al and connected the Al wire to it; used the anti-oxident compound, whose instructions say to follow the advcie of the manufacturer of the connector, but they don't say anything. Oh well. Got a new tange cord. It had the cheesiest galvanized, pressed-steel cord-strain relief going. Anyway, all works well. Thank you all for the information.
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