CSI electrical mistake

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said...

"production values" have increased ?
compared to what ?
we have the same folks bringing us that abomination "American Idol".
we have the same folks bringing us that 'technique' of shaking the camera lens & jerking it around for no viable reason (thereby making a joke out of ENG helo's who have six figure "gyro stabilized image stabilization camera platforms".
we have the same folks bringing us shows that glorify beating the other guy senseless ("ultimate fighting").
and other assorted rubbish that "hollywood" puts out (and an equally moronic - and large - segment of society, buys into with enthusiasm).
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On Thu, 05 Jun 2008 09:21:23 -0400, Calvin Henry-Cotnam

The thing I find most "unbelievable" about the show is that I have saw Grissom "taste" evidence it 3 different shows.
He tasted toothpaste that had been used to fill in a hole in the wall. He licked a bone. And, he tasted a yellow substance on a shopping cart that turned out to be mustard. Ever heard of baby shift yellow? :)
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said...

I think he wanted to taste Lady Heather too. He was afraid Sara would beat the piss out of him though.
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metspitzer wrote: .

Almost every chemical substance is characterized by "taste," as in "odorless, colorless, tasteless..."
Taste is a common diagnostic tool.
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wrote:

unknown substances?
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If his drill has exposed metal parts that were not connected to each other then a combination of faults could make one piece of metal "hot" and the other "neutral." If you use the drill you get the full 120 volts.
As an example, say you have a mostly plastic drill but the chuck and metal and a couple of the screws that hold it together are metal. You use the drill on something. You right hand is in contact with the screws that hold it together and you left comes in contact with the drill chuck. ZAP. And the GFCI would not trip.
If the ground was functional, the "cross" would likely cause a ground fault.
Don't get me wrong, what I outline isn't likely to happen. And many/most smaller electric drills only have a 2 wire plug.
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Has anybody mentioned 'isolation' transformers; particularly as one understands are used on UK construction sites?
Agree that having to drag around a heavy transformer or have longer extension cords can be a chore; having done it since 1956 in order to use my 230 volt British Wolf drill (purchased in 1953 and still going strong) here in North America on 115 volts 60 hertz!
Also have now added some carefully grounded 230 volt outlets above a work bench to avoid having to use the transformer, which also acts as an extension cord when not at a fixed location. Also bench saw etc. are 230 volts.
With the North American 3 wire 115-0-115 volt system the maximum voltage to ground is 115 RMS.
The UK construction site system appears to combine, for the use of hand tools, the best of two worlds?
It allows the use of generally cheaper and more universally available 115 volt tools on European mains voltage of 230 volts 50 hertz.
As understood, the construction site isolation transformer has a 230 volt input. The isolated secondary winding is half that at 115 volts and since it is closer to where the tool is used voltage drop not a concern.
But, particularly, the 115 volt secondary is centre tapped and THAT is grounded/earthed. So the maximum voltage to ground/earth, at the tool itself, is 115/2 = 57.5 volts RMS.
So the maximum 'peak' voltage, per cycle, to ground, at the tool, is around 81 volts!
Compared to 230 x 1.41 = 263 peak volts for a hand held 230 volt tool, that's a lot safer?
Thinking of a possible variation of that system to use on our North American 115/230 volt domestic wiring. And or use a lighter weight auto-transformer to be able to plug my 230 volt drill into 115 volts more easily, anywhere.
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CSI is fantasy. There is no connection between it and reality. Any time they show something more technical than a wood pencil you can count on it being bullshit.
Here some hints for you: dna matching against a 50 million record database takes more than a second. Computers don't beep when they think. They're capable of displaying text faster than twenty characters per second without beeping and CSI agents are rarely involved in gunbattles.
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