CSI electrical mistake

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I was watching CSI. It is a great show.
Some guy falls 12 floors. His drill has been shorted and the ground plug has been cut.
CSI says the GFCI is useless without the ground plug. < false
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From my understanding you are correct. Tony

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A GFCI does not measure short to ground. It measures a difference between current in on the hot and current out on the neutral. So, the second the guy's drill "shorted out" the GFCI would have popped.
In fact, the code allows GFCI's to be installed in place of a 2-prong ungrounded outlet. However, the receptacle must either be labeled as ungrounded, or the grounding port must be permanently sealed. They figure that a GFCI in that case is still better than the old 2-prong outlet, or someone installing a normal 3-prong outlet.

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wrote:

The GFCI might trip before the shock kills you but you can still fall off the ladder
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On Wed, 04 Jun 2008 21:14:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You may be right. I have never experienced a shock from a device plugged into a GFCI.
I have heard that a GFCI manufacturer has a video of a person jumping into a pool with an electrical appliance that has been plugged into their GFCI.
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What was useless without the ground prong was the main circuit breaker which would have tripped as soon as it was plugged in otherwise. (in actual, the GFCI would have beat the panel breaker to the trip)
GFCI trip current is designed to be low and fast enough to minimize the jerk reaction from a shock. They recognize already that most shock injuries are secondary from the reaction.
Lets all hear it for plastic power tools and double insulation. Eliminates the need for a ground.
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On Wed, 4 Jun 2008 19:39:24 -0700, "pipedown"

I have tripped a GFCI a couple times in a "shocking" fault. You definately know you were shocked and you will jump. (once was a defective tool, once was just a screw up, grabbed a wire I thought was dead)
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pipedown wrote:

But a lot of double-insulated tools have a large exposed metal area that the user will likely hold during operation. An example is the metal gear case of a corded electric drill. Doesn't that defeat the double insulation? I don't use double-insulated tools with 2-prong cords, except in GFCI-protected AC outlets, and then I test the GFCI immediately before use.
I've had two plug-in GFCI's fail, one by shutting off the current, the other -- its replacement, by leaving the current on all the time. The second replacement is still OK.
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larry moe 'n curly wrote: ...

Depends on how it is connected to the rest of the saw. If it is isolated, it still won't/can't complete a circuit.
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dpb wrote:

The motor's non-isolated metal shaft is in contact with a metal bearing, either directly or through a metal gear, that's in contact with the exposed metal. IOW if a motor winding shorts to the armature, electricity can flow through the metal part of the case.
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I like CSI and CSI Miami,but they are full of "mistakes". They are entertainment,but not factual.
(Florida doesn't have gun registration and our cars don't have front plates;MAJOR errors.)
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Jim Yanik
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Yeah, CSI Miami is probably the worst of the 4 such shows on that network. NCIS comes closest but still makes a few technical mistakes. I also find all of them entertaining but wouldn't rely on anything I saw on them if I were a juror.
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I've read that jury candidates who watch CSI and like shows are often rejected for duty. They tend to expect evidence that is not possible or practical.
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Jim Yanik
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pipedown ( snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com) said...

I wonder how many of these "mistakes" are really mistakes and how many are deliberate misinformation.
These shows do a surprising amount of research, given that this is just entertainment. I had a relative who was the chief coroner in our province in the 70's and 80's and his office was consulted a few times by the producers of Quincy. Given that production values have increased since that time, it reasonably follows that research has followed.
From that and the desire on the part of the producers and the networks to avoid litigation, it seems reasonable to believe that deliberate misinformation is sprinkled into scripts to prevent the accusation that the show is a "how-to" manual on committing murder.
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said...

IMO,the CSI:Miami "Florida gun registration database" is an attempt to bias the unknowing public in favor of gun registration,as a tool for solving crimes,when it hasn't been shown to be effective at that.
also what irks me is when a CSI holds up a bullet and says "9mm" without measuring it,and the difference between .38,.380,.357 Magnum,and the several 9's is only a few thousandths of an inch,not discernable with the naked eye.
They also show a CSI test-shooting a handgun into ballistic gelatin and the actual bullet depicted is a spitzer RIFLE bullet.
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Jim Yanik
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said...

You guys are paying too much attention to the CSI Miami legal stuff. The lab is lacking as there is never any duct tape to be seen. Pay more attention to the hot chickies and their atire. That's for real.
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re: Pay more attention to the hot chickies and their atire. That's for real
There are girls on that show? I gotta watch more carefully.
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wrote in
You would think someone with the initials DD <pun intended> would be more attentive...
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Such mistakes bug me, too, but TV writers are just that: writers. They're not engineers, physicians, judges, lawyers, chemists, physicists, gunsmiths, etc. Let's face it, a TV show based on real lawyers would be pretty boring - let's watch for an hour as they talk on the phone, write letters, and get stuck in traffic driving to court to hand in a motion to a judge's clerk.
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snipped-for-privacy@antispam.net (Bill) wrote:

The writers give general idea of what they want, but SFX guys are what put these together and you would hope even if the script had direction that said (visual shooting pistol, SFX: Rifle bullet in gelatin) they would ignore it. Most of this is more related to the desire to use something already paid for or stock than anything else.

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