Crown molding scarf joint question

I am putting up crown molding at the top of my kitchen cabinets. When you are scarf jointing 2 pieces of molding at a 45, do you still cut the molding on the miter saw upside down with the bottom molding resting on the fence? ( similiar to doing outside and inside corners?) I have to join 2 lengths together and was wondering before I cut what is the correct way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 9 Dec 2007 17:14:05 -0800 (PST), Mikepier

No. If you've got a compound miter saw, you can cut scarf joints flat on the bed setting miter angle to 0 and tilt to 45.
If you don't have a compound saw, you can cut them with the molding vertical against the fence, and use 45. With tall molding, this won't work.
As previous poster said, it's always a good idea to pick up some cheap molding (doesn't need to be exactly the same as the good stuff) to experiment with.
HTH,
Paul F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 9 Dec 2007 17:14:05 -0800 (PST), Mikepier

No. A steeper cut than 45-degrees will make a better stronger scarf joint because it will have more glue surface area. If you can add a support piece to the back of the molding, all the better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike,
You miter the outside corners but you cope the inside corners. The angles are never exactly 45 so coping helps make everything fit well and look good. A scarf joint is when you join two pieces together end to end. It's a lot more than just some glue. Do you really want to scarf joint something in this project?
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thats what I thought scarf jointing was for, to splice two moldings together. What other option is there? I'm not joining outside or inside corners.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are correct. A scarf joint is used in that position. Try to make the cut so the observer is looking 'past' the point vice against it if possible. Minor point but it does help hide imperfections.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well i got it done and it looks good. That was the easy wall, Just one straight piece wall to wall. Next is the other wall which has a fridge and wall cabinets. No scarf joints but a couple of outside and inside corners. By the way, these moldings are maple, same as my cabinets from Kraftmaid. Is maple really hard to cut? Because it seemed my miter saw really had to work hard to cut this molding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 10 Dec 2007 18:36:26 -0800 (PST), Mikepier

Yes, use a sharp blade...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 10 Dec 2007 18:36:26 -0800 (PST), Mikepier

Examine the cut. If it is fuzzy, your blade needs resharpening. Maple cuts easily.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike,
I'd always called this a butt joint but I checked and you're right, It's a scarf joint. I don't see why you want to make this joint a compound miter. I'd simply press the moulding flat up against the fence and make the cut. I don't think that anything more than that will be needed.
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your right. I actually tested 2 pieces, one with the molding against the fence, and one with the molding upside down at a 45 against the fence and base. The first one looked best, so I stuck with that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.