Crown molding on vaulted ceilings

What do ya think of crown molding along a slanted vaulted ceiling? My wife suggested it might look good, but I'm having a hard time visualizing the lower intersection where it meets the regular horizontal crown molding.
We have a 14' vaulted ceiling running about 28' front to back and looking for ideas to dress it up with a fancier look.
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I like crown molding, but I am not sure I would like it with most vaulted ceilings.
There are several possible solutions to the intersection. What would work best would depend on the particular situation. One possibility would be a block to terminate whatever molding is intersecting at that point.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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wrote:

Visit the local borg and look at a DIY book _Crown Molding & Trim. Install It Like a PRO_
http://www.compoundmiter.com/index.html
Very helpful book for a DIY person.
-- Oren
"I didnt say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you."
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Oren wrote:

There was also a very nice (and competent) article in a very recent Fine Homebuilding dealing with large-scale mouldings and such trickery...
--
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BTW, a sample vaulted crown...
http://www.compoundmiter.com/images/cath4.jpg
-- Oren
"I didnt say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you."
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I've seen that book while gandering around. Looked interesting. Never installed crown molding. Thought I saw an article someplace that said crown molding over a certain width requires a 12" compound miter saw or it makes it a lot more difficult.
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wrote:

You saw it gandering in the book! :-)
The tool list is amendable....
-- Oren
"I didnt say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you."
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Then the moral of the story is:
It pays to gander.
- or -
Buy it ya cheap f*. It's worth it.
- or -
All of the above.
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wrote:

Adding crown molding should improve the overall look of most homes. Intersections need to be done properly to look right, and an interior decorator should be able to tell you the details. Unlike base moldings, crown moldings are always there for everyone to see so these must be done meticulously. Coping skills are not all that difficult to do as they look, once you've done a few.
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Pick out a crown molding you like with the help of a knowledgeable decorator. Hire good finish carpenter and helper and have the molding installed. With your 14' loft and 28' run, you have a two man job. If you choose to do it yourself you will need scaffolding, a decent sliding compound miter saw like the Makita 1013, an air compressor, a finish air nailer, and at least twice the lineal footage of molding you think you wll need because of the bassackwards cuts you will make. A pro will know how to make all the neat little turns and transitions that will result in a classy job. The DIY books will show some examples, but with limited experience it can be frustrating. Before you embark on a major crown molding project in your living space (remember SWMBO will see it very day) try smething smaller like a basement playroom. Good luck.
Joe
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I have vaulted ceilings with molding. It was built this way, and it looks fine.
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Thanks for the input.
I'm fine with flat molding but am totally unable to cut crown without wasting 2x as much as I end up with on the wall.
Due to the height, and lack of skills, I'll hire a guy with a scaffold. :)
Any more thoughts on what if anything to do along the apex of the ceiling? Last house I had we screwed a 2x6 front to back along the apex, then nailed on rough sawn cedar for a boxed beam look. This time we want something more contemporary.
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I don't mean to sound ignorant here, but I don't understand what you mean by apex. Can you post a picture somewhere?
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wrote:

Okay. We are all cone-heads, so the pointy tip is the apex.
Unless I'm wrong.
-- Oren
"I didnt say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you."
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on 10/10/2007 10:55 PM USA1st said the following:

Apex = the highest point in a triangle, pyramid, or cone. In this case, where the underside of the rafter beams meet at the ridge.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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