Crimping and arthritis

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question

a

time.

the

"bite"

Pretty much (although I cut one wire too short and no amount of crimping was going to help that - I suppose a male/female disconnect but obviously the solution was to save the scrap and redo the cutting).
But Lord almighty the ratchet crimper does the job first time every time if you manage to get the wire through the hole right that is. I already crimped an empty connector in a tight space where I couldn't see the wire had popped.
This gives me an excuse to redo all the 12vdc crimps I've done because they are so much more positive than the old single "tooth" crimpers. Besides, since I started crimping I've learned to use adhesive lined heat shrink around such connections (two layers!) to add some extra mechanical strength so that any tension on the connector is at least partially absorbed by the shrink-tube reinforcement. Plus it keeps them waterproof.
Most importantly in my desire to play with my new toy, I discovered how many crappy crimps I had entered into service because I didn't know what a good crimp should look like. I suppose I should take pictures. I should be ashamed to admit this but the crimp "blanks" are all color coded and I never noticed before. D'oh. Anyway, the new tool has caused a wave of maintenance to occur on cables that got less notice than they should. A double blessing, sort of!

it

I envy your handstrength. The big plus here is that the crimpers oddly feel almost hydraulic in nature. The last part of the squeeze seems effortless compared to the midrange effort, as if some stored force is creating the crimp. It's very odd. Maybe it's because once the resistance to the deformation of the circular end of crimp occurs and it become elliptical. That shapes means crushing it the rest of the way requires less force. With the T&B (??) type tool I never knew how much pressure was enough. Now I can be sure when the ratchet releases, the deal is done. The lessening force to squeeze the crimpers almost acts as a shock absorber when the crimp is complete.
Note to Joe Taxpayer: $20 got me *more* than enough "bang for my buck." Far more than I expected although there was a moment that I thought "this isn't any better than what I am using." After only a little more experimentation I realized this was *way* better than what I have been using. So much so, I am going to redo a lot of old suspect crimps (if only for inspection purposes). I am leaving instructions for it to be buried with me. (-:
The same thing happened when I got my Snap'N'Seal coaxial crimper for waterproof connectors, mostly for cable TV. All of the old hex crimps (and worse, twist on connectors!) came off and were replaced by the S&S connectors because the technology and the quality of the crimp were so superior - if, as Ralph says, you cut the wire right. (-: Took me a while to figure out how to strip the wire for Snap'N'Seal connectors (and that different brands required different prep) but I got there eventually.
I let someone borrow my perfectly aligned, three level RG-6QS stripper and he ran it backwards and it never stripped correctly again. )-: It was another miracle tool. If you just made the tool end flush with the end of the cable and it would strip outer jacket, inner shield and center cable in one quick "clockwise" whoosh. I still mourn its loss and haven't been able to find a suitable replacement. Don't lend out your tools.
--
Bobby G.



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On Thu, 27 Mar 2014 06:31:15 -0400, "Robert Green"

Is crimping your hobby, or do you do it for a living?
I hope you won't feel you wasted 20 dollars when I tell you this, but there is a drug in final trials that should be on the market soon that should relieve the problem you've had.
You need to take it 3 hours before crimping. I think it's called Crimpagra.

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On 3/29/2014 2:15 AM, micky wrote:

Everyone around you will be amazed, rock hard crimps, and you can keep going for hours? Call your doctor if you're crimping for more than four hours.
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On Fri, 28 Mar 2014 17:40:45 -0400, "Robert Green"

Is crimping some sort of euphemism?

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Sorry, crimping's just crimping. Adding little quick disconnects and spade lugs to the end of various wires.
--
Bobby G.



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Robert Green wrote:

Ooooh, those little male and female connectors doing their thing. Wiring and plumbing are the two areas where I usually wind up having some sort of sexual problem halfway through a project.
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<stuff snipped>

Be careful what you say to a crimpizoidal maniac. "You just watch yourself. I have the death sentence on twelve systems!" (-:
I think you need some neural crimping. Some of your axons have become disconnected from their associated neurons. A twenty minute session with a Dremel, a cut-off disk and my new crimpers ought to straighten out the bad connections. Let's set a time . . .
In the immortal words of Dr. Emilio Lizardo, "Laugh while you can, MB!"
http://www.unloosen.com/thestuff/archives/2010/05/the_adventures_of_buckaroo_ban.html
Some day you'll discover a part of your body doesn't quite work the way it used to.
--
Bobby G.




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and

To me, crimping sounds less sexual and more scatological. You squeeze and squeeze and groan a little and finally a crimp spits out. (-:
In a follow-up to a follow-up, I discovered that the fully insulated connectors I often use:
http://www.allelectronics.com/make-a-store/category/196150/crimp-terminals/fully-ins.-female-1/4/1.html
don't crimp nearly as easily as the plain old "insulated" terminals that have insulation only around the base of the spade lug. The FI connectors take a LOT more force than the simple units, which are the ones I use the most, so it's no biggie. Besides, I can make the FI crimps on the benchtop, where I can lean down on the crimpers. That's harder to do inside a box, which is where the new ratchet crimpers excell.
The fully insulated quick disconnects when used with adhesive heat shrink tubing make for a pretty watertight seal without a lot of fuss. If I am really concerned about water getting in I encase the whole joint in adhesive-lined HST - I can always cut the outer layer away if I need to access the joint. I just bought a can of Liquid Electrical Tape based on a note I saw here. Interesting stuff and great for things that heat shrink tubing can't deal with. We'll see how it holds up compared to the ALHST. I am going to redo all of the wiring for the battery-powered backup sump this weekend.
FWIW, Dave Houston in computer.home.automation turned me on to Allelectronic where I've spent probably as much money as I have at Harbor Freight. HF has better prices but occasionally Allelectronics gets a huge lot of something like the Philips Stumble Lights that they price pretty low - far lower than I think they would have had they known how quickly they would sell out.
The sensor for my Floodstop is set up on fully insulated connectors with a spare already crimped up and ready to go. Same with the HomeVision temperature and humidity sensors. I can swap out a bad sensor in under a minute, even if I have to slice through a protective outer layer of HST. For stuff I connect and disconnect often in "drier" environments I use these instead:
http://www.allelectronics.com/make-a-store/item/con-321/2-conductor-waterproof-connector-awg-10/1.html
They're not really waterproof but they come close enough and almost all of my battery analysis and maintenance gear is standardized on them.
I like the fully insulated disconnects for another reason: when using them with 12VDC equipment, I can always paint the negative ends black and the positive ends red. That's helped a lot in keeping the magic smoke inside things like trickle chargers. I did manage to repair one that had been hooked up backwards. Two voltage regulators blew for a total cost of fifty cents. Cracked the VR's right in half. Ever since then I have been obsessively marking polarity on everything battery-related with red and black nail polish.
--
Bobby G.





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On 3/29/2014 6:49 PM, Robert Green wrote:

I got some red vinyl tape off Ebay and some yellow. Black electrical tape for pos, and red vinyl tape for neg.
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Robert Green wrote:

I used to get the AllElectronics catalog but I haven't seen one in a while. Just as well. I'd thumb through it and start to thing "I wonder what I can do with that odd little gismo?" They'd come up with strange stuff every now and then.
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while.

now

Yes. They were good for the oddball part and electronic device. A lot of that stuff I can get for much less from Ebay's overseas vendors but at least once a year I stock up on Allelectronics goodies. They used to be a great source of neodymium magnets dirt cheap until China doubled the price for the rare earths they produce.
They sell a great self-fusing rubber tape I've not been able to find anywhere else, a really inexpensive grounded three-way adapter and some really useful coaxial power plug adapters that can convert the standard 2.1mm power plug to a number of other sizes. The really good buys often sell out *very* quickly. Some stuff, however, is dubious. I bought some high-temp red and black automobile "zip" wire that was defective. If you peeled it apart, the insulation would not strip smoothly and often it would peel away where you didn't want it to. The solution was to score it with a very sharp knife before splitting it. What a PITA.
--
Bobby G.



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crimper.

longer

Mostly the 1/4" female quick disconnects that are found on small 12V gel cell batteries - the kind that a normally done by a "cheapy" unit that's all a wire-stripper with different sized holes along the inside edges of the tool.

Haven't found any likely candidates so far but I am still searching. I found a fairly nice kit but it was for coaxial hex crimps, something I couln't crimp with non-hydraulic tools even before arthritis found me.

Yes! That's exactly what I need. I have a pair of Ideal waterproof coax crimpers that are articulated like bolt cutters that I can still use but I haven't found anything like them for spade lugs and don't see how I could adapt them to do what I want.
The search continues . . .
Thanks for your input, Mr. Bowman (and my apologies if you're a Ms. <g>)
--
Bobby G.




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Maybe you can try one like this ebay number.
eBay item number: 380862395211
It ratchets and will not release before the full crimp is made.
I don't use them for terminals but use some similar to them for crimping coax connectors with.
I use the ones like philo uses for the electrical terminals, but if I had troubel with them, I would try the ones that ratchet.
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crimper.

longer

Wow! We may have a winner here! They are articulated like bolt cutters and my Ideal coax crimper.

I suspect we own the same coax crimper.

I can hardly type the last few days I jammed up my hand so badly trying to crimp a replacement connector.
Only downside is that shipping is almost as much as the crimping tool. Oh well. If I had to drive around looking for these, it would probably cost a lot more in time and gas that $11 - hmmm Ebay has been redesigning their pages again - why is it showing me Canadian postal rates- ah, this is Ebay du Canada! Are you from the Great White Way?
Actually, the item's listing lead me to a very productive search phrase for Google:
http://www.google.com/search?q=HEAVY+DUTY+RATCHETING+CRIMPER
There's a lot of potential winners out there.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/COMPOUND-WIRE-CRIMPER-TERMINAL-CABLE-LUG- CRIMPING-ROTATING-DIE-HEAVY-DUTY-NEW/251396333541
That's the kind of leverage I need in the handles.
It's funny. My first Google searches were pretty inconclusive but once I read a few replies and picked out the important search terms, there's a whole hardware store full of "crimps for gimps" out there. Thanks, Ralph.
--
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That was just the first one I ran across. There should be lots similar to it. The one (actually have several) I have you can replace the jaws for differant things, but there was not too much differance in the jaws and the whole think , so I just went with the whole thing.
Once you get the connector started you can use both hands on them. Maybe even extend the handles if needed.
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On 3/17/2014 7:39 PM, Robert Green wrote:

Might be of no use, but.... * Can you put the lug on back of your vise, and pound it shut with a hammer? * Would a C-clamp work better?
Arthritis is totally no fun.
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On 03/17/2014 07:39 PM, Robert Green wrote:

I used to suffer from arthritis but not any longer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbBURnqYVzw

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On Mon, 17 Mar 2014 16:39:52 -0700, Robert Green

I added 15 inch long tubes over the handles of my nail nipper, not from pain, just weaker. Can you add tubes over the handles? Twice the leverage may make it comfortable again.
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On 03/18/2014 11:02 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

I recall getting a tire repaired and a few days later needed to remove it to do a brake job.
The shop way over torqued it and I could not get it off with my 4-way...so I put a large pipe over it. Rather than removing the bolts, all I managed to do was convert my 4-way into a pretzel.
I took the car back to the shop and had him loosen the bolts. I showed him my deformed 4-way and told him: "I could not loosen them, and it's not because I'm a wimp."
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On 3/18/2014 12:35 PM, philo wrote:

I think there's a testosterone thing about put lugs on so tight the next guy can't get em loose. I've had that happen enough times. I've taken to insist on finger tight, and I'll torque them in the parking lot. The air heads give me a lot of crap about that "wheel will fall off".
On aluminum rims, it's essential to retorque, the next day and 2nd day after. Those are at risk of falling off (this, I know....)
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