Creating a home Ethernet out of installed but unused Cat 5

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The phone company has installed, throughout the house, shielded Cat 5 cable with 4 sets of wires. One is used for phone service, while each of the other three is terminated with what looks like a plastic sleeve imprinted Dolphin (just in case it makes a difference...).
I have a wi-fi broadband router on the second floor (physically connected to two computers); I also have another computer in the ground floor den which is currently wirelessly networked with the others. The phone company's breakout box is in the basement, naturally.
For various reasons, I would like to physically network the first floor computer. Ideally, I would like to install in the router room a wall plate with an RJ45 jack, with a patch cord connecting to the router. Currently, the Cat 5 terminates in a standard RJ11 jack. The same would go for the ground floor den; there, however, the Cat 5 terminates in a wall plate with a coax F-type jack at the top and a standard RJ11 at the bottom.
So that's the question - how do I approach a project like this? In particular, how do I go about making sure that, while I go two floors down and then one floor up, I am still connecting the same set of wires to the appropriate terminals in the router room, the breakout box and the den? What type of tools would I need to accomplish this?
Thanks.
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IMO, the surest way, is to disconnect the wires from all equipment. Then go to one end of any cable and jumper out two wires of that cable. Then go to all the other ends and put an ohm meter on each cable until you find the one you jumpered. Then mark both ends of that cable.

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If you want something to ring out the cat 5 conductors, you need a LAN tester. You can buy one at HD

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Just to be clear, TELCO and ETHERNET in the same cable can be problematic. I have tried it and the results have been poor.
VERIFY the pairs everywhere. Especially at the outside terminal block.
The devil is in the terminations. I have seen poor terminations take a CAT 5 down so low it was worthless.
Black Box has an excellent catalog with lots of information on the types of connectors, tools and color codes.
I repeat myself I WOULD NOT run both services in the same cable. Your house your rules.
Plan on spending at least $200 bucks for tools and terminals. Just to get started.
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Thanks, SQL, advice and warning both well taken. It sounds like it would be more effective (and maybe even cheaper) to have someone drop Cat 5 from the second floor to the first and just disregard the phone lines.
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I agree. For most people, even if they've worked with LAN termination equipment for years, will find it's too easy to make a mistake in the wiring. You don't want to mix telco conductors with your computer conductors as the results can range from bizzare to catastrophic. Telephone wiring is not all low voltage. Do you really want a 90 V. ring voltage accidently in contact with your computer's LAN port?
Category 5, 5e, or even 6 wire is cheap. (You generally won't need the shielded version unless you are in a high RF environment). Buy a 500 ft box and cable up your house as you need it.
Beachcomber
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While not optimum, I have to disagree. The best solution, of course, is to run a new cable. However, running a phone line and ethernet in the same cat5 jacket should present little or no problem IF DONE CORRECTLY. I've done it many times for the sake of expediency and have never had a problem. I've even added 12vdc on the 4th pair and still had no problems. Just make absolutely sure your connections are done properly.
As for tools, www.mpja.com has a very extensive tool kit for $80 that has more than you will ever need for maintaining the wiring in your home (http://www.mpja.com/productview.asp?product 043+TL). While I use better quality "pro" grade tools for regular use, I keep one of these kits at my second home and another in the trunk of my car "just in case." They do the job quite competently, are of decent quality and are ideally suited to occassional users.
What you need: For upstairs and downstairs buy 2 Cat5 RJ45 ethernet keystone jacks and 2 RJ12 keystone jacks (get 2 colors like blue for data and black for phone; i.e. MPJA #11082TT & 7182TT), one keystone F connector (Home Depot), & one 3 hole and one 2 hole keystone faceplate (MPJA 5944TT & 5943TT). You'll also want to get 4 Scotchlok connectors for the basement location (Home Depot).
How to do it (using only the tools in the kit): On the 1st flr look at the phone jack and determine which wires are used for your phone line - most likely the white/blue pair. The remaining 3 pairs should be just left loose. You can cut off the "Dolphin" connectors on the other pairs if you've determined that the wires aren't being used for any other purpose. Connect the tone generator to one of the orange/white pairs (if you have more than one pair after cutting the connectors) and turn it on. Use the wand to locate that pair at the basement phone box. If it's not loud and clear, go to the top floor location and see if it's loud and clear at the jack (you may have loop wiring). Now do the same thing but put the tone gen on the other white/orange pair. What we're trying to do is see where each end of the cable goes from the first floor location. If the cable goes to the second floor location then you don't need to do anything in the basement. If not, repeat the procedure on the second floor so you can identify the pairs from each location that go to the basement. In the basement, match the conductor colors of the white/orange pair and the white/green pairs and connect with the Scotchloks. Do your terminations with the new jacks at both locations upstairs and check it all with the cable tester in the kit.
From:SQLit snipped-for-privacy@qwest.net

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You can share the cable for 10baseT or 100baseT, but 1000baseT uses all 4 pairs, so there are no pairs left to share.
If the cable is at least cat3, it will support 10baseT. 100baseT requires cat5.
Is this cable home run from each jack to the terminal, or is it daisy chained from one jack to another?
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On Mon, 30 Jan 2006 02:38:30 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@tantivy.tantivy.net (Bob Vaughan) wrote:

and with 100baseT, it's more important to wire it right (for example, receive uses 2 wires. pins 3&6 on a connector must be connected to wires in the same pair). I discovered this when I converted a functioning 10Mbps network to 100Mbps. The connection LEDs came on, but no data was transferred. I needed some correctly wired cables.

Daisy chaining can work fine for phone. It won't for ethernet.
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It runs from each jack to the terminal. In what way does it make a difference?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

If it runs from each jack to a central terminal you can replace the terminal with a switch. If it's daisy-chained you can't.
Quoting what your replying to is nice. It gives context to your question.
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Keith

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On Mon, 30 Jan 2006 02:20:29 GMT, Herb Stein wrote:

Actually I think it was for the PBX telephone system which I think is digit not the consumer telephone which is analog. It was also at a time of 1 M data networks with promise of 10M data networks.
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Back when the standard was established most phones, including those on a PBX, were still analog. The switches themselves were digital but phones were still analog. The digital cards and digital phones were showing up "as needed" because they were still very expensive.
From:Neil Cherry snipped-for-privacy@cookie.uucp

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You could do a simple continuity check with a 9 volt battery, a couple of leads with alligator clips on each end, and a cheap voltmeter - all available at Radio Shack. Connect the battery to a pair of leads downstairs and see whether you can read 9 volts upstairs.
But are you sure it is Cat 5? You said it's shielded - it seems very odd that the phone company would install a) Cat 5, and b) that it would be shielded. Could be but odd.
If the wire is indeed Cat5, be sure to make the splices as short as can be, untwisting as little of the pairs as possible. The twist in Cat 5 pairs is important. And remember that pins 1 & 2 use one twisted pair, pins 3 & 6 another, simple continuity with any old pair of wires is not enough.
Bruno wrote:

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"But are you sure it is Cat 5? You said it's shielded - it seems very odd that the phone company would install a) Cat 5, and b) that it would be shielded. Could be but odd. "
I can only go by what I read on the outside jacket of the cable. It does say "shielded" and it does say "Cat 5" (although not "5e" or "5ENH"). I don't know if it answers the question of oddness, but the last time the phone company (Verizon) was in the house, they installed their fiber optic service (FIOS), replacing the cable company's internet connction. (BTW, FIOS is excellent - rock solid 24/7; never had a problem).
Anyway, as part of that, they also moved the residential phone service coming into the house from the copper line to the fiber. They MAY have also rewired the inside lines and installed this odd cable. Just a guess.
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How's the latency? My cable often has less than 100mS.

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Bennett Price wrote:

well phone company probably didnt install it anyway. The builder did. Especially if its in the wall...
Cat5e is as cheap as cat3. I havent seen cat3 in years.

If its CAT5 and he intends to put network on it, be sure not to make any splices at all.
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If your cable is CAT5/5e/6 it will have the label every couple feet on the sleeve. No label; no CAT; no ethernet.
I've never seen shielded CAT-anything but I assume it's also properly labeled.
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On 31 Jan 2006 09:33:47 -0500, Al Dykes wrote:

A long time ago I remember seeing sheilded cat 5. There is one big problem with sheilded. You can only ground 1 end not both. I've also seen cable that is sheilded and looks like cat 5. The problem with this stuff is the impedance of the cable is out of spec and will cause all sorts of problems.
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