Creating a 220 circuit?

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#10 rather than #14? What sort of "special wire" are you talking about? Is it sold at "special wire" stores?
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High-temperature insulation. 75 and 90 deg C are typical, but some types are rated for *much* higher temperatures.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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>How does it differ from running a wire for a new light, except that it is >#10 rather than #14? What sort of "special wire" are you talking about? Is >it sold at "special wire" stores?
much lower risk of fire from a light bulb?
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wrote:

the faintest idea? And why would a properly sized romex circuit care whether a heater or a light bulb is attached to it?
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It doesn't.
The stuff about 90C wire matters _only_ when you're wiring _inside_ fixtures that produce heat or are likely to get hot.
For example: inside flourescent fixtures. Inside ceiling J-boxes that hang lamps. Inside baseboard heaters.
An in-wall circuit supplying a 30A receptacle for a (say) construction cube heater does not need to be anything but ordinary NMD (can you still use "ordinary" NM down there?).
Up here, everything is NMD or better.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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higher gauge wire, so it handles higher, almost constant current?

(keyword is properly sized. do you honestly believe the wire on a household circuit is properly sized for a 4500 watt heater? even if the wires were properly sized for a 20A breaker, they still would have a max of 3800 watts)
a heater draws much more power and more often than a light bulb. When the temp outside hits -20 or -30 celsius, that heater will work many hours in a day. many more amps are going through that wire.
The standard wire for a circuit over here is 14 gauge, 2 wire in a white flat plastic cable. the heating wires are higher gauge, thick and orange. I don't know the exact NMD code for them, I'm not an electrician, but I do know it's not the same wire you'd use in a standard household circuit.
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white or yellow. The temperature of the device has no bearing on the cable used to bring electricity to it. At least you admit you don't know what you are talking about, which is better than many people here, but why do you then give advice?
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I didn't give advice. I just said it's most probably not possible to make the 240 from his two 120 outlets and even if it were, he doesn't have the proper wiring for it. even if he has a wire rated for 20 amps, that heater will draw 19 amps and in time the breaker will probably trip.
I also don't believe this is a plug-in heater because household plug-in heaters are 120V not 240. in the original message he calls it a "4500 watt heating element" which makes me believe he's just hacking this thing together from pieces, which makes it even weirder/more dangerous.
basically, it's a high power heater, much higher than the 1500 watt plug-in heaters sold in stores, and I wouldn't plug it in a normal circuit that wasn't designed for heating.
so, what exactly is your problem? you believe my answer should have been "sure, of course you can run your 4500 watt 240V heater by simply connecting it to two separate 120V outlets" ?
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My problem is ignorant morons giving advice. I would have liked you to not make any posts.
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again, what advice did I give? please, enlighten me. all I did was explain why he probably will not be able to get 240V out of the two circuits.

don't like it, don't read it. killfile me or fuck off.
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As opposed to a learned moron or an intelligent moron? Are these oxymorons? (pun intended) hahahahahahaha
Stan
Main Entry: ignorant Pronunciation: 'ig-n(&-)r&nt Function: adjective Date: 14th century 1 a : destitute of knowledge or education <an ignorant society>; also : lacking knowledge or comprehension of the thing specified <parents ignorant of modern mathematics> b : resulting from or showing lack of knowledge or intelligence <ignorant errors>
Main Entry: moron Pronunciation: 'mOr-"n, 'mor- Function: noun Etymology: irregular from Greek mOros foolish, stupid Date: 1910 1 : a mentally retarded person who has a potential mental age of between 8 and 12 years and is capable of doing routine work under supervision 2 : a very stupid person
On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 01:25:00 GMT, "Wade Lippman"

{Delete nospam for email}
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think you meant an intelligent ignoramus; and no, that's not an oxymoron either. Sadly, you will find many of them in the underclass. Perhaps a learned moron is an oxymoron, since it is possible but most unlikely.
However, jj is almost certainly both a moron and an ignoramus.
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wrote:

As he said, he did not give advice. It was all just a very good ploy to get you to "wade" in with your vast storehouse of knowledge to give the OP some productive additional information ... and possibly the guidance he requested (after weeding out all of the insults to the other less worthy members of the NG :)
--
Mike

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I dunno... maybe the orange color make it able to carry more current.. <g>
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wrote:

Do you have any idea at all what high temperature insulation means? I thought not. If you are the alphageek, I hate to think how dumb the betageek is.
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I think you're getting confused by the requirements for appliance cords on toasters, electric kettles etc.
In-wall circuitry for a plug-connected heater doesn't need any different wire than other circuitry.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
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highest external (plug-in) heater I've seen around here is 1500 watts. I doubt a 4500 watt heater is plug-in.
plug-in heaters work on normal 120V outlets (since most houses only have 240V for the stove, dryer and baseboard heating). a 4500 watt plug in heater would draw 40A.
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I have a plug in heater that uses a special wire in the cord for it, but the reason for this is because it's run inside the case of the heater where it gets hot.
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I have two of them.
They're oft-called "construction cube heaters". They're about 10"x10"x12" or so, usually painted orange. They have a fan. You should be able to buy them at Home Depot for well under $100. The one I bought new was $65 CDN - got the other at an auction.
Many companies make them.
Popular on construction sites. Used for example in keeping unheated buildings warm for drywalling. I use them to heat my garage when I'm working in my shop.
Standard 220V 30A 3-prong plug on a 10ga stranded copper appliance cord.

If you ran it at 120V. They're 240V.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
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right, but how many houses have 240V outlets around the house ?
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