Craftsman wrench quality

Page 2 of 3  


Sez you.
If the spanner fingers cold bend outward, bad mojo, as the size changes and the wrench will start rounding corners. This is common with Asian wrenches and why I will not buy them. In this case, only the handle bent (twisted). The open end spanner maintained its integrity and never spread. This, unlike Craftsman combo wrenches, of which I've snapped off a finger on two different wrenches. Besides, when the nearest Sears is 90 miles away, a bent wrench is better than a broken wrench.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/22/2013 8:23 PM, notbob wrote:

That's why I have spares of the most used tools. I even have cheap "loaner" sets for Billy Bob who want's to borrow a tool. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A great idea.
I'll probably get the USA made Craftsman set, since I'm jes a back yard DIY'er, anymore, and they go on sale, tomorrow. If one breaks I've already go my eye on a set of Proto's (at 3X price!), which now include flank drive technology in all their 12 pt boxes. Turns out the metric set I have is not German made, after all, but a set of Proto's. Duh. A damn fine wrench. ;)
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/23/2013 6:27 AM, notbob wrote:

I hate loaning tools out to anyone I don't trust implicitly. I've loaned tools out before and when the tool was returned, I asked, "Where's the carrying case?", Billy Bob always answers, "Carrying case?" o_O
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/23/2013 10:54 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

That sounds like a good question to ask at the point of the loan.
Billy Bob always answers, "Carrying

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I was a eng tech in Silly Valley, test techs would come around to anyone's tool chest and jest grab what they needed, they thinking themselves above the common courtesy of asking because of their "at all costs" mandate to get the product out the door. I would track the swine down and physically yank my tools outta their hand --along with other admonitions-- and got a rep for not tolerating such nonsense. Got so they left my stuff alone. I was prolly the only guy on the floor with all the tools/equip originally issued me. ;)
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/23/2013 9:25 AM, notbob wrote:

LOL, I recall telling my manager that as engineers that were expected to do a lot of lab work we each needed our own personal set of tools that we were responsible for, and that it didn't work to keep borrowing tools from the technicians. To his credit, he agreed and we spent a couple of thousand dollars on tools, meters, and locking tool boxes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, September 17, 2013 7:13:30 AM UTC-4, notbob wrote:

I bought a set of Craftsman wrenches, sockets, etc., about 6-7 years ago du ring one of their sales. They came in a plastic carrying case. I've used th em all over the farm and home without any problems. I also have a variety o f Craftsman ratchets and sockets and combo wrenches that I bought back in m y piston-head days of the late 1960's; they are all still serviceable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The only Craftsman tools from my 1968/69 set that are not perfectly useable today are those I have lost or misplaced. I think I had one box end wrench and a couple pliers replaced and 2 or 3 ratchet head repairs over the last 45? years. I think I had a couple philips screwdrivers replaced and broke at least one hammer handle.
Compare that to a highschool classmate who bought Snappies, and broke a pretty large percentage before finishing his apprenticeship. (Snap-Off tools). I bought a few SK tools over the years, and a fair number of Herbrands. I do also have a few snap-on and I think the odd "blue point" which was Snap-On's industrial brand. A few other miscalaneous oddballs for good measure (Proto etc)
My 2 years in Zambia we had almost exclusively Hazet and Gedore with a sprinkling of a British brand I can't remember at the moment.(halfords??) More "industrial" than "automotive" in both cases - no polished chrome, and chunky. My students never managed to break any of them.
The set I carry in my vehicle is a "mastercraft" set from Canadian Tire - about 15 years old - split one socket, lost about 2 - latches on the plastic case departed a few years ago and the velcro strap has let a few escape. Decent quality and lifetime guarantee.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Umm.. You are wrong on both counts. You didn't lose them and they are still perfectly useable.
Next time you're south of the border, stop by. I'll let you look at them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 03:32:27 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Were you at the US Street Rod Nationals in Tulsa in '76? That's the only time I had my craftsman tools in the States - or did you come up here and snitch a few???? However you got them, pack them up in a box and ship them home. I'll pay the shipping!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It sounds like Derby isn't offering their return, just that you may visit and greet them.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/18/2013 7:47 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In Canada, there is a company called "Acklands" which has recently had some kind of merger with Grainger in the USA, and is now called Acklands Grainger.
Originally Acklands and now Acklands Grainger sells their own housebrand tools under the name "Westward". I don't know where they're made, but they're good quality too.
'WestWard Tools : Home' (http://www.westwardtools.ca /)
I've had my Westward 3/8 inch drive socket set since I was 16 years old.
I think any decent quality set of tools will last you a life time if you don't abuse them. Sears has the advantage that there are Sears stores in every major city in the USA and Canada, and so replacing the tool isn't a hassle.
--
nestork


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 06:18:50 +0200, nestork

It's been Acklands Grainger for over twenty years up here. Acklands started out as an automotive and industrial supplier - similar to NAPA

Yes, Westward were/are good tools.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The merger that really got my attention. When Yoplait Yogurt merged with Moore Foods. The new company, known for short, as Yo Mo Fo.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/18/2013 12:18 AM, nestork wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/17/2013 9:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

...

...
I've Craftsman wrenches from the 40s-60s on the farm that are still good as new--the older socket sets are from my initial purchase-era of mid- to late-60s. They cover the normal range up to 1-1/4"; it's rare to find larger stuff from Craftsman so the heavy stuff is other. I bought a cheap 1/2" drive ratchet set a few years ago simply as was value-priced on sale solely for the metric sockets that were in short supply when returned to the farm -- the handle is adequate in service but lousy for feel so it doesn't get used. The prime ratchet that's been here "since forever" from the time I first remember in the 50s isn't identifiable by brand. It, unfortunately, is finally beginning to wear enough on the innards that it occasionally slips a cog...
There are other Craftsman hand tools like the pipe threader/dies and a large pipe cutter that were grandfather's that date from an unknown time -- I venture the 30s or perhaps even earlier. They still are the "go to" ones. Of course, on a farm they don't get daily use but over that period of time they've done a lot of work...
There's a collection of a little of about everything here plus a lot of old no-name stuff. That that gets/stays to the front of the chest or on the hanging board is generally the S-K, Proto and one other which I can't recall now that were sets from the 40s, 50s, and 60s. Dad gave me a nice S-K 3/8" drive ratchet set for HS graduation in 63 that I've added some to that still have/use as well...he had two full sets similar vintage that are also still here and (mostly) still complete.
All in all, the Craftsman has held up as well as the other but I've not much direct experience with anything very new when I really stop and think about it --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, September 17, 2013 4:13:30 AM UTC-7, notbob wrote:

Yes, but there are 3 Craftsman lines:
Craftsman
Craftsman Industrial/Craftsman Professional
Craftsman Evolv
The first two are made in USA by Danaher, the same company that makes Easco, Matco, and NAPA hand tools (and Fluke multimeters and Tektronix oscilloscopes???), but Craftsman Evolv is made in China, and warranty claims require a copy of the receipt.
The last formal review of wrenches I could find was in the Aug. 1993 issue of Consumer Reports:
http://i.imgur.com/Mfh3QLj.jpg
Bench Top was Kmart's brand; Popular Mechanics was Walmart's. TrueCraft is or was made in Japan. Master Mechanic is True Value Hardware's brand, and I was surprised that its ratchet wore out in just 10,000 strokes (just like Great Neck), compared to over 30,000 for the higher rated ratchets. Olympia wore out in 20,000 strokes.

Yes, unless the store manager is a weasel, but I haven't encountered that, yet. I've used the warranty only twice, for 1/4" drive sockets, probably 8mm or 9mm, that I broke by turning them with a 3/8" ratchet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I loaned my big pinch bar to my next door neighbor Jerry......
he was trying to clear some sort of blockage in his chimney, the rope broke and he couldnt get it out.....
I cant ask him again about it, since he just died from lung cancer........
a truly sad event, made worse by his son watching his dad die a horrible death..
if you smoke QUIT, jerry was 58 and looking forward to retiring....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
this is a letter I sent to Sears regarding the quality of their Craftsman tools. I my or may not get a reply.
Re:    Craftsman Tools & Products
To Whom Ever
In the many years that I have been repairing cars of mine, of friends & family and professionally, I have always purchased Craftsman tools because of their quality. The warranty was always a distance second in my purchase decision, quality was always the prime objective, quality. Craftsman was always a quality product, whether the product was a mechanics wrench, socket, ratchet or if it was a lawnmower, table saw, radial arm saw .... whatever, the product was a quality product, not anymore.
I purchased a Craftsman lawnmower. I had so many problems with it I took it back, within the 30 day re-turn period. I got so much grief from the store management on its return that Ill never ever purchase a Craftsman power product ever again. I have always recommended Craftsman products to friends, family and fellow professionals, but not anymore. There was once a time that the only place one could purchase Craftsman products was at Sears. There was once a time that Sears carried ONLY Craftsman tools, now Sears carries:
Rikon Wen Apex Pro DeWalt Port Mate Guhdo i-drill Black & Decker XCP
Of those mentioned above, Im only familiar with DeWalt and Black & Decker. These companies once were in competition with Craftsman, but Craftsman was almost always the choice, why, because the Craftsman brand was always a quality product and was always built, manufactured or made in the United State of America (USA), but the Craftsman product is now made in either Taiwan or China and the cost remained at the Made in USA price. Oh yeah, wasnt there a lawsuit in 2004 to wit:
A class action lawsuit has been filed against Sears, Roebuck and Co. on behalf of consumers. The suit alleges consumer fraud and claims that that Sears has been misleading consumers through false advertising that its Craftsman tool line is "Made in the USA." The suit states that promotions in ads, the website, on signs and labels that Craftsman is "Made in the USA" led consumers to purchase the tools out of a sense of patriotism. Consumers were also led to believe that Craftsman is of high quality because it is "Made in the USA." Pictures attached to the complaint clearly show metal parts from Austria, Denmark, China, India and Mexico on Craftsman tools boldly labeled as "Made in the USA."
The quality of the product is declining, but the cost continues to escalate. Well, if I can, Ill see to it the as many people I know never buy a Craftsman product ever again. If I can, i will see that this letter gets out to some Craftsman Blog out on the internet.
Thank You for ruining a great product just to increase your profits,
So there you go, this is my opinion take or leave it.
--
Ronald C. Sibthorpe

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Welcome to the 21st century. Chinese owned companies can mfr goods on US protectorates islands like Guam and American Samoa and then sell the goods in the US labeled "made in USA". Parts can also be made anywhere, then assembled in the US and carry the same "made in US..." label. This all due to the US govt being the best govt money can buy.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.