Cracked heat exchanger

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Obviously James you do not represent a journeyman level of technician if you fail to red tag such situations. Its black & white in the building code. Have you ever read the mechanical codes?
As Bubba said, you'd be wise to educate yourself on levels of co that are hazardous to human health and the levels that are required to trigger most UL approved smoke detectors.

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On Mar 14, 11:56 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gonefishin.net wrote:

I said it should be replaced in the very first sentence.
But the big co scare that some technicians like to put on their customers is bull. The units are engineered to deal with a crack because otherwise the manufacturer would have been sued out of business long ago.
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wrote:

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I haven't and unless someone posts it, I'm not going to.

Not the one that went off when I had CO. It woke me up.
It was store bought.
It was far louder than necessary, and all I had when it went off was a very small headache. So it went off soon enough.

We agree. Very few people will spend 200 dollars. If you actually convince people that they have to have one that expensive, most of the people you convince will buy nothing. Why would you want to do that.
Have you heard the expression, "Don't let perfect be the enemy of good."

All life decisions involve weighing the odds. How many people in the US die of CO each year? Multiply that by 80 and divide by 300,000,000 to do a first estimate of the odds of any one person dying of CO in his lifetime. They're very low, whether someone has a CO detector or not. He might get more safety for his 300 dollars by buying better tires, or part of the cost of ABS brakes, or other things.
Especially when 40 dollar CO detectors work pretty well.
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mm wrote:

For the cost of a new heat exchanger, 100 African babies could be saved, 10,000 Bangladeshies could be vaccinated against typhoid, or I could have a really good meal and maybe a lap-dance.
It's a value decision.
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CO concerns aren't related to just death although that rates right up there. Chronic low level CO exposure is or should be a concern for anyone who's pregnant or elderly, or has elderly people or very young children in their household. Levels well below the amounts a UL listed CO detector can alarm at are an issue.
While this site isn't laid out particularly well, there is a lot of information here. www.coheadquarters.com/CO1.htm
This chart is a good, quick guide. www.coheadquarters.com/ZerotoMillion1.htm
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Post your facts and where you get them instead of talking nonsense about pressure and combustion fumes with a cracked heat exchanger. Anyone who has this type of issue are incouraged to seek professional guidance instead of listening to this garbage. They will sleep better at night......And it's always nice to wake up in the morning.
-paul
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Yes it is possible to have carbon monoxide leak into the home from a heat exchanger in a inducer draft fan furnace. The pressure with in the heat exchanger is still greater then that out side it until the blower kicks in and even then the risk of pulling C02 in to the house air is present.
Yes deaths have occurred here just a few:
http://www.dailystandard.com/date/2006/03/02/news/headline2.htm (http://www.dailystandard.com/date/2006/03/02/news/headline2.htm ) http://www.carbon-monoxide-poisoning-injury.com/news.htm (http://www.carbon-monoxide-poisoning-injury.com/news.htm ) http://www.homesafe.com/coalert/cofacts.htm (http://www.homesafe.com/coalert/cofacts.htm ) http://www.coheadquarters.com/COEpidem/coepidem02.htm (http://www.coheadquarters.com/COEpidem/coepidem02.htm
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On Wed, 14 Mar 2007 16:27:58 -0400, "Charles Schuler"

Please look at the header and note that this discussion is only about cracked heat exchangers. Not one of the your postings concerns a death from a cracked heat exchanger.
The reason is because there has never been a death from a cracked heat exchanger.
Sure there are lots of co2 deaths. Sure, there are lots of deaths from furnaces that are defective. But never has anyone died from a properly working furnace that happened to have a cracked heat exchanger.
It is just physically impossible to get enough co2 into the living quarters to cause a fatality from a cracked heat exchanger. Can't happn. Never happened and never will happen.
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Really? Can you point me to any? I'm getting concerned because the CO2 levels in my house are very high. I can even fell it every time I breath. And it reeks of nitrogen too.
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