cracked concrete slab new home

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I sent my photos to a structural engineer, he wanted $350.00 just to show up. He suggested I get a free estimate from a foundation repair company for free and go from there.
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OP-
That's what engineers charge, that's how they make their living. Call another one to see if that price is out of line.
IMO....... pay the $350, cheap for the peace of mind it will give you (independent of his answers)
That "free" estimate isn't really free....the cost is built into the work he's going to suggest you have done.
Get the engineer's evaluation & fix the cracks yourself (if they even need fixing) with a suitable caulking product, the engineer can suggest a product.
Did you read those first four Google hits?
Even if you "fix" cracks IF you've got expansive soil issue AND the slab / foundation was under designed or under built. and oyu allow the soil moisture content to vary.....you'll get new cracks.
You'll learn a lot more from the engineer's visit / letter report than you will from the repair contractor.
Do you have the structural drawings for the home? How about a soils report form the builder?
Before you do anything........ gather up the existing documentation it will give you, your contractor & your engineer (if you hire him) something to work with.
cheers Bob
cheers Bob
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wrote Re Re: cracked concrete slab new home:

I wouldn't be surprised if the said it needed a "repair".
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I have found from my immediate neighbors that they are having issues with there flooring like cracking builder installed tile, builder installed cheap imitation hardwood flooring flexing and making noises when it flexes (walking on it).My builder is not cooperative, he has the know it all attitude and if one of his handymen can't fix it-oh well. Would my local town building inspector have my soil survey info?
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Contacting the building inspector certainly can't hurt. He may know if there have been other homes built by this builder that did have structural problems. You could also ask him for a reference for a STRUCTURAL ENGINEER. I agree with those that have said getting a foundation repair company is not a good idea. You're in a potential dispute with a builder and/ or warranty company over what could be a major and expensive repair. What did you expect a structural engineer to charge? $350 to show up and give an initial opinion of whether more investigation needs to be done or it's nothing to worry about sounds about right to me. I would have asked him how much an hour they bill, and if the cracking/ door movement turn out to be structural, what range the total engineering work may fall into and exactly what you would be getting for the $350.
I guess you could take the approach that if the foundation company says it's not a foundation problem, then it's likely not. Of course, you're relying on their expertise and without extensive investigation, who knows? If they say it is however, which I'm betting they will, then I would most definitely get a structural engineer in. If you expect to get the builder/warranty company to pay for it, you're in a 10X better bargaining/legal position with a structural engineers report, than with an estimate from a couple of foundation repair contractors.
As I previously suggested, I'd find out if you have a new home warranty. If you do, contact them and tell them you think you have a structural problem. They will then send out one of their inspectors. Of course, he's not on your side, but if they're going to pay for it, they have to get involved. And if there is a warranty, I'd factor into whatever you do how long the warranty runs for, ie if you take a wait and see approach and this gets worse, are you still covered for X years? And if no warranty, then time may be of the essence anyway. Around here a couple good size builders already have gone bankrupt in the downturn. If that were to happen and you have no warranty, you are SOL.
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On Oct 24, 9:31 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I found out the 1 year warranty is it. There is a ten year structural one through the state of NC but it's a get a lawyer and sue them deal. The foundation repair company came out and said I do have a problem but it's not to the point of needing repair yet, he couldn't tell if it was normal settling or a more serious problem because the house is only 2.5 years old. Just told me to keep an eye on it and document everything.
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On Oct 24, 9:31 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I found out the 1 year warranty is it. There is a ten year structural one through the state of NC but it's a get a lawyer and sue them deal. The foundation repair company came out and said I do have a problem but it's not to the point of needing repair yet, he couldn't tell if it was normal settling or a more serious problem because the house is only 2.5 years old. Just told me to keep an eye on it and document everything.
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Who told you that you have to sue to collect on the 10 yr structural warranty? It's true most of them aren't very eager to pay out, but this is the first time I've heard of a warranty where you have to sue them as the first step. Usually, you can file a claim with them, have them come look at it, show them your experts report, etc, and then they either agree to cover it or deny it, at which point then you could sue. Keep in mind there is small claims court too.

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On Oct 24, 4:37 pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I called a few lawyers and discussed the problem. I have since found an exposed bolt in the slab that is holding down the house to the foundation for high winds. If it's not structural problems then they sold me a house with known defects. They looked at the door once, adjusted it and said that's as good as they can get it. I guess I will get some estimates to have the problems repaired, have an engineer look at at and then off to court. Would a structural engineer or civil engineer be best for evaluating the house and the soil below? I think the soil is an issue also.
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And they told you that the only recourse with the home warranty is to sue? Without even knowing what warranty you have or making a simple phone call to the warranty company? You should have documentation from the closing that specifies the warranies, if any, involved. I'd go read that, if I were you. The process you're describing sounds like recovering from the builder, absent any warranty. I've never heard yet of a warranty where the first step is you have to sue them.
I have since found

If you want an engineer, I'd ask the local building inspector for a recommendation. You'll likely find that many firms have engineers in multiple specialties and can figure out who which guy is most appropriate. Given you're considering legal action, I'd make sure the guy has impecable credentials. Consider that whoever it is, their opinion is going to be questioned.
And before you figure on going off to court, you better figure out how much the whole thing is gonna cost. If it's small, $2k -5K, whatever the limit is in your state, then you can go to small claims without a lawyer and have a decent shot at prevailing. If it's $10-25K, you're in a bad spot, because it could cost that much or more to pursue and you could lose. Above that, then I guess it starts to make more sense to sue, assuming you have a good case.
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On Oct 26, 7:01 pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

My closing attorney said all that I had was a 1 year. The state of North Carolina says you have a 10 year structural but getting a dirtbag builder to honor it means the legal system. Live and learn-Veranda Homes LLC spends more time telling me what they are not responsible for than checking to see how homes are built. The general manager(Robert Exum) is the only employee who holds a NC contractors license for Veranda Homes LLC. I have never seen him checking any of the 200+ homes they have built, so you are left to the technical expertise of a few Mexicans. I am pursuing this with the NC State Attorney Generals office along with others. He is also developing another project, Waterford of the Carolinas. You can't be a developer and a builder at the same time-IT SHOWS1
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Note LLC that limits their exposure:( Builders frequently go out of business, ending ALL their liability.
Then start anew, to scam people again
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Need an opinion as what to do with the front door. It's a standard 36 inch fiberglass door with a sidelite on the opening side. On the hinge side the door is hitting the door frame at the top and bottom but has a 1/4 inch gap between the center hinge and the door frame.
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Remove the jamb casing on the hinge side. Cut or remove nails if necessary, though you can probably lever the door jamb into position without removing the nails. Shim the jamb to correct the problem. Reinstall the trim.
There should be at least 3 existing shim sets - top, middle, and bottom. Maybe you didn't get any at the mid point or they were installed poorly. Some carpenters would use 5 sets.
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Thanks
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Thanks for the info
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Well today I went out and my cracks on the outside of the concrete slab on ground have grown from 6 to 11 cracks!
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wrote Re Re: cracked concrete slab new home:

Get a structural engineer in to look at it. If he says they will be a problem, then go to a lawyer with the expert opinion.
If the engineer says they are not a problem, then you have peace of mind.
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I had a soil test/sample done-all sand and wet clay down six feet right next to the slab in 5 places. Funny thing in 2 spots after 6 feet down there was nothing for about one foot, the soil compression tester just dropped down 1 foot with no resistance.
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