Crack repair in drywall

Page 1 of 3  
Hi, a significant crack has developed in the drywall between the living room and kitchen. I think the weight of the pot rack has, over time, contributed to the crack, but I'm not taking it down.. I've repaired smaller cracks with spackle, sanding and a coat of paint, but since this is larger, and the pot rack will still be hanging there, I want to make a more robust fix, if possible. IS there a better way to fix the crack ? Thanks
Here's a picture:
http://tinypic.com/r/1zxl0gm/9
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A lot depends on what is above the layer of spackle. Is it dry wall, plaste r and lath, ect. It appears to be an older house, is this the case? If so i t may be lath and plaster. To correct the issue I would start by making sur e the pot hanger is properly anchored into a beam, and not just the lath. A fter that the best way would be to remove about 4 inches from around the cr ack(2-3 in. on each side) then insure the lath above it is in good shape an d re plaster.
Hope this helps!
J
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com submitted this idea :

That looks like a stress break from foundation movement. Do you have/had any earthquakes in your area?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, no earthquakes in my area. But I can check the foundation to be sure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, February 19, 2016 at 1:24:38 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Better grab a shovel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm not so sure that's related to the potholder at all.
Is there any chance that's water damage?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02/19/2016 12:43 PM, TimR wrote:

If the eye hook uses a toggle bolt which will pull on the drywall, that could be a problem.
OTOH: If it's screwed into a wooden stud then it's probably not the cause.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
the hooks for the pot rack are screwed deeply in to beams. Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02/19/2016 01:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

OK, then as some of the others mentioned, it's probably just a matter of removing the tape and replacing.
Might as well look at the foundation of your house though...just in case there is more to it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The pot holder didn't crack the wall. My suspiscion is a combination of a weak foundation and a bad roof.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Little chance its water damage, however, it is possible that there was some structural work done in this area before I owned the house. We think there had once been a wall between the living room and the kitchen that wall was removed, and if so it would have stood right about there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

I have a hunch that's the source of the problem -- that there used to be a wall there that has since been removed.
Also, I suspect that it isn't drywall -- but instead maybe wood lath underneath with plaster over the wood lath.
Regardless, I think you would need to start by removing some of what is there along the ceiling crack first -- to get down to whatever is underneath. If you find that it is plaster over some type of lath (wood or wire), you'll have to do the repair from that point forward. That may require securing the wood lath, or removing a whole section and replacing with sheetrock.
Maybe you could take some off and take another photo or two and post the photo(s) here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I once lived in a house that was added on to. The addition was built on concrete blocks that aooarently was not put below the frost line. Every year the two corners of the room cracked, and a spot under a window mid-wall. After patching it at least 5 times, I bought some quarter round molding for all 4 corners, and some flat trim which was about 1/4" thick and 1 1/4" wide. I nailed them over the cracks and painted them to match the walls. Those cracks could shift all they want, becuse they were covered by that trim. Some people would not accept this "Fix" but I just got tired of patching it, and knowing it would crack again.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo laid this down on his screen :

I wonder if waterproof paint on the exposed block would prevent moisture getting into those blocks and causing the cracks....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I guess I was not clear. The cracks were not in the blocks. The walls were drywall over studs. I mentioned the blocks meaning the foundation was not adaquate and that part of the building shifted. It was an old farmhouse, and this is common on old buildings, which were sometimes built on nothing but a "footing" of some rocks and mortar built right on the soil surface.
I think thats why they used wallpaper so much in the "old days". It covered the cracks in the plaster!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hi.. im the OP Yes the sloping ceiling goes up to a cathedral ceiling in the living room. I'll take a look for a local professional. But in the meantime, for anyone interested i'll post more picture, what do you want to see?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think that it may be helpful if you could provide a wider angle photo of what is there now (as is) so people could get a sense of more of the flat ceiling and more of the cathedral ceiling -- to see how or where any of the load bearing walls are or were (before the wall removal).
If there is an accessible attic above the flat ceiling, maybe you could look in the attic and verify in which direction the ceiling joists (for the flat ceiling) run. In other words, do those ceiling joists above the flat ceiling run parallel to the back wall (where the window with blue curtains is); or perpendicular to the back wall (where the window with blue curtains is).
And, maybe, if possible, remove some of the plaster where the 3-4 foot major crack in the ceiling is located. Then take a photo or two of that. The main thing would be to try to see if there is plaster and wood lath under the ceiling crack; and maybe be able to see if there is some type of structural double header there or something else (such as a single ceiling joist running perpendicular to the back wall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 20 Feb 2016 14:38:47 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Can't get to the pictures right now - which way does the cathesral cieling run? does it run up from the wall where the cracks are, or from the kitchen? If it runs up from the kitchen, what supports the ends of the rafters? If it runs up from the wall where the cracks are, what holds up the end of the flat kitchen cieling???
Makes me even MORE suspicious someone removed a bearing wall. If I were a betting man, it would be a pretty sure bet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

Your original question was about how to repair the crack. And, for the ceiling crack, there is no doubt that the first step in the process will have to be to break out and remove what is there now -- especially since part of that crack is hanging down below the plane of the ceiling. Even if you were to "look for a local professional", the first thing that he/she would need to do is take down some of that material to see what is underneath. And, frankly, if it were me, I wouldn't bother trying to find a "professional" just yet -- at least until after I had a chance to see what is underneath the crack (of course, by "underneath", I really mean "above" the crack).
So, I think a good first step -- since you will need to do it anyway -- would be to break out and remove some of the plaster or whatever it is where that 2-foot long ceiling crack is located, and take a couple of photos of that.
It is true that there may be a more serious underlying structural issue, but it also may turn out to not be as serious as all of that.
So, my vote is to start by breaking out and removing some of the plaster or whatever it is where that 2-foot long ceiling crack is located, and take a couple of photos of that and post them here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Okay here are additional pictures. In the outside pic you can see a patch in the siding where it looks like they moved the sliding glass doors about 2 feet. This is one of the reasons we think a wall was removed as part of a kitchen renovation (this had to be at least 10 plus yrs ago.)
http://tinypic.com/r/2wdni3l/9
I agree about excavating the area, I'll start opening it up next weekend and I'll post pics of the inside. Thanks to everyone for the help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.