CRABGRASS has taken over

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Crabgrass has taken over most of my lawn..I live in Northeast PA and treated my lawn in the spring for crabgrass & weeds (dandelion etc,)..we have had a very dry summer and since I didn't cut my grass (nothing was growing the lawn turned brown) crabgrass took over,,2 yrs ago I had a company do everything & the lawn looked great but it was getting to costly so I did it myself..What can I do to stop the crabgrass & prevent the spread of it..CAn I do anything in the FALL or do I have to wait until SPRING...please HELP!!!!.
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john246 wrote:

I'd wait until spring and put pre-emergent down. Good rule of thumb is to do it before forsythias bloom. You may have been too late this year. Do the weeds later.
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On Sun, 9 Sep 2007 18:56:05 -0400, "john246"

Try watering your lawn.
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wrote:

That has been restricted for many of us in PA due to the drought.
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wrote:

Then you'll get drought tolerant grasses.
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clipped

If mown too short, you get brown, dead grass. During drought my son just let the grass grow. It was quite long, but green with no watering while his neighbor's short stubble turned brown. The weed and feed stuff is horrible - you don't need broadleaf weed-killer applications every time you fertilize. One treatment with broadleaf, then periodic spot treatment or hand pulling of weeds should suffice. Seeds remain after treatment, and arrive later, but if consistent good practices are used you will control weeds without constant chem. applications. Pulling one weed by hand might remove several hundred seeds.
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Agreed. Once a lawn is in decent shape, it should never need weed n feed. Spot treatment of weeds is more effective because it delivers the herbicide right on target and it minimizes the use instead of spewing it everywhere.
One treatment with broadleaf, then periodic

Treatments for broadleaf weeds will do nothing to solve his crabgrass problem, because crabgrass is not a broadleaf weed.
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wrote:

<<snip>>
Not at all trying to be a wisea** here tnom, but are you saying that what survives will be the drought tolerant grasses? If you have an inside line on this I'd be interested so that I can seed those bare areas with it. Of course, I could always Google that for some more info. TIA, Chuck
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C & E wrote:

Well, pretty much by definition... :)
There are many levels of "drought tolerant". Some of the newer hybrid fescues and bluegrasses are less water-demanding than older traditional varieties. For really drought-resistant varieties there are things like buffalo grass. What would be appropriate in wherever you are is depending on where you are (DOH! :) ) and soil types, etc. Your local county extension agent or state agricultural school is probably the best starting place for local recommendations.
--
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There are individual varieties or blends that are composed of varities that are more drought tolerant. Check websites of individual suppliers. I think Lofts has a summer stress blend. Or check seedland.com for different grass seeds and characteristics.
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On Sun, 9 Sep 2007 18:56:05 -0400, "john246"

The crabgrass will die at the first frost. What you need to do now is to heavily overseed your lawn and apply a time-release STARTER fertilizer. Remove any dead grass from your lawn before overseeding and mow to the lowest setting the day of the overseeding. You may need to protect areas with straw. Keep watered for 2 weeks. Next spring apply pre-emergence and apply again after 90 days. Overseed again in fall 2008. Crabgrass seeds can remain dormant for over 15 years, but it has hard time sprouting in a thick lawn. Buy the highest quality weedless seed you can find.
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wrote:

Are you recommending the use of broadcast seeding by hand or is it necessary to rent a seed drill?
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wrote:

If there is a layer of thatch either remove that or rent a slit seeder. The seed must be in direct contact with the ground, else it won't sprout. If you use a broadcast spreader, rake the seed into the grass. In PA you really need to get this done ASAP.
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If he has a thatch problem, that should be solved without regard to reseeding. A slice seeder is always the best way to re-seed, without regard to thatch, because that does give the best seed/soil contact. And it's fast and easy.
The seed must be in direct contact with the ground, else it

I'd do it now if he didn't have the crabgrass. But given a severe crabgrass problem, I'd wait a couple weeks, till late sept or first week in Oct, so the crabgrass is dying off as the new grass is establishing.
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wrote:

Do you know the best seed rate on overseeding? ( Pounds per sq yd) Thanks for the help!
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Depends entirely on the type of seed. For example, bluegrass goes down at a much lower rate than tall fescue, because the seeds are smaller. The rate for overseeding is about 1/2 the rate for establishing a new lawn.
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wrote:

I can tell from the appearance of the lawn. Crabgrass likes barren soil, so I suspect a heavy overseeding is recommended. A 50# bag for a half or a quarter acre is about right (you can do the math). Actually, it's hard to over do it.
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So, you'd put down 50# of bluegrass or 50# of tall fescue on the same area? Ever read a seed bag?
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john246 wrote:

Crabgrass requires an entirely different control than dandelions. Pre-emergent, I blieve atrazine. Not enviro-friendly. Must be applied at the right time - timing very critical. Ck. with your area extension service. Fertilizing and watering the good stuff helps keep it down, but the dry spells in many areas this summer were beastly.
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A tip that was given to me by an old farmer is to use weed and feed fertilizers that have amine bases. This is in the % analysis on the label. I don't recall the other chemical base, but the one you want has .....amine on the end. One soaks into the leaves, and one makes a gas. The amine is the best one. As someone here also said, a preemergent is good, but the timing is critical. With the weed and feed varieties, the drawback is that you have to time the watering, cutting, and application in a fine ballet so that it works, and it doesn't work in one treatment. Because you are fertilizing at the same time, you can't apply it every few days or you will burn it with fertilizer, and that is about as bad as just applying a nonselective herbicide to the whole thing and starting all over.
Next time, get yer head out in the sunshine and deal with it before you're knee deep in the stuff.
Steve
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