CPVC/PVC plumbing questions

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jamesgangnc wrote:

Thanks. I was thinking of doing it that way but one of the codes I found ( http://publicecodes.citation.com/icod/irc/2009/icod_irc_2009_29_sec005_par035.htm ) seems to indicate that only approved adapters that are made for transitions from one type of material to another are allowed. I am not sure if I am reading that correctly. However, since they do make adapter fittings (transition unions, I think) that are specifically made for going from CPVC to copper, I'll probably use those.

The property already has 3 separate hot water heaters and 3 separate boiler/furnaces -- one of each for each apartment. So, I will be changing from the one meter that is there now to 3 water meters -- one for each unit.
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RogerT wrote:

Thanks everyone. Final update -- we finished the project last night using all CPVC pipe and fittings plus the transition adapters to connect the CPVC to the existing copper. It worked out great and now the water is completely separated out for each apartment unit as planned.
I am REALLY appreciative of those who pointed out that the code no longer allows for PVC for cold water distribution within the dewlling, and that CPVC is now required for both cold and hot distribution lines. So, we went with all CPVC and we used the one-step yellow no-cleaning-solvent-required type of CPVC glue.
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I had some sticks of CPVC left over from a project about 10 years ago. They were stored inside my shop. When I went to use them for another project this week, I found that they had turned brittle, to the point that PVC cutters would shatter them rather than cut thru them. Don't know what this says about installed CPVC other than I hope I never have to splice into an older install.
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Were your pipes exposed to sunlight? If I remember correctly, CPVC does not have UV protection, which would probably cause the pipe to break down in sunlight. (Grey PVC conduit does have UV protection).
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I agree. Sounds like it was exposed to uv. I have cpvc in my lake house. It's 8 years old and it cuts fine.
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Mine is around 25-30 years old, no problems.
Harry K
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