Countertop Stove Insert - Oversized Rough Opening

All,
The countertop stove insert in our kitchen was in dire need of replacement. We shopped around and learned that there are 2 sizes: 30-inch models and 36-inch models. This dimension is basically the length of the unit measured across the top after installation.
Ours measured 30-inches so, with that in mind, we selected a unit at Sears (our currently installed model was a GE). Anyway, I asked the guy at Sears if there were specific rough opening size requirements. He told me that I was in the best position possible because I already have one installed and the task at hand would be to 'remove the old and insert the new' and that 'all rough openings are standard' and that, in fact 'most countertops are pre-cut for inserts so the dimensions are always the same'.
Not true.
I wasn't in the best possible position - I was in the worst possible position, because the opening was too large. According to the installation instructions that came with the new unit:
- The rough opening width should be 19 1/2 inches to 20 1/8 inches. Our rough opening width is currently 20 1/2 inches.
- The rough opening length should be 27 1/4 inches to 28 1/2 inches. Our rough opening length is 28 3/4 inches.
Obviously I do not want to replace the countertop - we looking at tossing out a 16 foot piece of butcher-block counter that's probably only 5 years old.
A not-so-bad positions would be if the opening were too small. At least then I could cut if to size. Ok, so here are my thoughts and questions:
- How about I 'patch' the opening? I thought about building it out to the correct minimal dimension (19 1/2 by 27 1/4) positioned flush to the top of the current formica. I could then cover the patched piece with formica, overlapping the existing formica, taking care to match pattern the best way possible. I'm a bit wary of this approach because I think it has really good potential to look like s^&%)*.
- Does anyone offer some sort of escutcheon much like that which goes around a door-knob assembly? I understand the intent of these are to cover up old lockset installations which is similar to my need.
- A hybrid of the above ideas: a patch with a homemade escutcheon? That is, build out a patch for actual support, positioning it flush with the existing formica top, and placing a homemade escutcheon over it. I probably could make it out of very thin stanless steel. This undoubtedly would be the most difficult to implement but I think it would look the best when all is said and done.
Any feedback is welcomed an appreciated. Thanks.
\cbf
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Look around for an new cook top that fits your measurements. Then return the one that does not fit. I ran into the same issue. I picked up a glass topped gas 4 burner top for $300.00, it was an old display model. Could not resist so I bought it before checking the measurements. Same problem, I ended ripping out the counter top and keeping the cook top.
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c.b.fernald wrote:

Check out a "hoody" rim. They are used to mount sinks in counter tops. Might find one that fits the outside dimensions of the new stove and "fill the gap" in the counter.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (c.b.fernald) wrote in message

Hi,
This might help.... http://www.microtrim.com/cooktop.htm
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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