counter depth fridges

Do you have one? Likes or dislikes. Brand? Finish? Would you do it again?
Thanks
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A great thing, IMO. Unless you want your fridge sticking out in the room like an eyesore. Kitchenaid side by side here, stainless.
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We were going to buy a Electrolux to fit into a tight space but SWMBO finally decided she didn't want to pay several hundred more for 2/3s the 'fridge. The fridge sticking into the traffic pattern isn't the best, but there's normally only the two of us around (well, so far only one - she hasn't moved yet). We ended up with the standard size 'fridge (27ft^3?), identical to the one in this house.
Bottom line; significantly more money, for less, wasn't a winning combination.
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On May 27, 7:41 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Don't know which ones you compared, but in my experience they were almost the same in cubic feet, just a couple cft less. They make up for the depth by being taller. I guess you could argue that depth is better than more height, but going from a std side by side to the counter depth one I didn't notice any negatives.
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On Sun, 27 May 2012 17:38:23 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

*Quite* a bit less. When two dimensions are the same, and the other is 2/3s, the space inside has to shrink too. They aren't like Hondas (bigger on the inside ;-). The Electrolux models are 28cu. ft. vs 23 (69 1/2" vs. 70" tall).

Nope, they can't be taller, and they would have to be at least half again as tall, or they wouldn't fit the standard hole. They're exactly the same height and width but 2/3s the depth. The two of us really don't need the added size (except for the freezer, perhaps) but they wanted several hundred bux more and that wasn't going to happen.
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On May 27, 9:37 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I have to disagree. Go look at Kitchenaid side by sides for example. In the standard type they have units that are 25.4 to 26 cft In the counter depth, they have units that are 23 to 24.5 cft.
The two dimensions are NOT the same. The counter depth fridges are TALLER.

Of course they can be taller and at least some of them are. I haven't looked at all of them, but I know that with Kitchenaid they are taller and the volume is as reported above, ie within a couple cft of the standard type.

Kitchenaid and my experience putting one in say you are wrong.
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 07:48:59 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

So they cripple the standard unit so the cabinet depth one is the same.

Cite. I showed you where this was *not* the case with Electrolux. They are the same (1/2" difference, which is within the range of the leveling legs).

The standard depth unit is small. It's easy to make the CD style similar.

Because they make a small standard unit and their CD is "normal" (for a cabinet depth). There just isn't as much space inside, when you lop off 8" from the front. Not possible.
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On May 28, 3:15 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

BS. Go look at the Electrolux website. They have side by side models that are std depth, 26 cft and counter depth that are 23 cft that are othewise identical. These are two examples:
EW23CS85KS EW26SS85KS
Now maybe that's a big difference to you, but quantitatively it's NOT anywhere close to your big difference in volume. And I'd say it's not enough to make a difference to most people. Trade 10% of the volume for not having the refrigerator sticking out seems like a fine thing to me. The OP can do what he wants. But he shouldn't do it based on false data.


More total nonsense. Electrolux, which YOU brought up, has standard units that are 26 cft. Kitchenaid is 25.4 to 26. Basicly identical, ie no crippling.

You think just because it's the case with Electrolux, that all refrigerators are the same? And that was never the point to beging with, was it? The issue was whether you gave up a lot of capacity in going to a counterdepth. The answer, which you refuse to accept is, NO. You only lose a couple cft, about 10%.


Oh BS. You know, you're amazing. Instead of just admitting you're wrong and that you can get counterdepth units that are within a couple cft of standard size ones, you choose instead to just double down with BS. There is nothing unique about those Kitchenaids. The standard one isn't "crippled" so it can look good with the counterdepth one. How dumb are you? Would you "cripple" the products that account for 90% of your sales so you could sell some more of the counterdepth ones? Clearly if they are "crippled" then so are the Electolux because they are the same capacity.


I just showed you that you don't even understand the basic specs on Electrolux: 26 cft for a std, 23 cft for a counterdepth. In other words, not a major difference despite your desperate attempts to pull yourself out of the ditch.
I have a counterdepth. I use one. I put one in. I know that it fits basicly the same stuff that the old standard one it replaced did. You obviously were too cheap to spend the extra bucks so you have a fridge sticking out into your kitchen. Enjoy it.
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 13:14:15 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

in
BS yourself. The French-door models are 27ft^3 (standard) and 23ft^3 (CD). 14.8% less volume, 14.6% less depth. They are *NOT* taller to make up for it.

It's *exactly* the same as the front-to-back difference. 15% less space, $400 more. No sale.

Wrong. See above.

Same? Pretty much. They have to fit in the same hole in kitchens. Make them too tall and they're not going to sell. A half an inch can mean tens of thousands of lost sales. Not smart.

BS yourself. You're not making any sense.

See above.

Then it *CAN'T* be taller for the same size. Good grief!
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On May 28, 7:29 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Let's go back to what you claimed:
"We were going to buy a Electrolux to fit into a tight space but SWMBO finally decided she didn't want to pay several hundred more for 2/3s the 'fridge."
Then explain to us how 23 cft vs 27 cft is 2/3's the volume. Per your own calculations above, it's only 15% less. And that's 15% less on those particular Electrolux French door models. With Electrolux's side by sides the difference is only 3 cft. I showed you other manufacturers who had for example side by side where the differences were only 10%. Did the OP say he was limited to French-door models? No.
Now, I'll leave it for others to judge who knows what they are talking about. I claimed:
"Don't know which ones you compared, but in my experience they were almost the same in cubic feet, just a couple cft less.
You claimed:
"We were going to buy a Electrolux to fit into a tight space but SWMBO finally decided she didn't want to pay several hundred more for 2/3s the 'fridge."
Instead of digging yourself into a hole, if you'd just gone to the Electolux website you'd have seen that even the French-door models only differ by 15%, not the claimed 33%.


The point is that counterdepth units typicall vary from the equivalent standard unit by about 10 to 15% in volume. Not 33%. Capiche?

More total BS. So Electrolux and Kitchenaid are crippling their standard side by side units, reducing their volume, to make their counterdepth units look better. Why do you keep repeating this nonsense which you have zero proof for and which makes no sense?

Again, just because your world stops with Electrolux, which isn't even a market leader, doesn't mean that's the whole universe. Kitchenaid had counterdepth units that are 71" tall and standard depth units that are 68 5/8. That difference in height helps make up for some of the space lost when you go to counterdepth.

At least I understand that 10 to 15% less volume does not equal 33% less volume, which is what you claimed. But go ahead, dig your hole deeper.

Which of course makes no sense. It's sitting in my kitchen. I had to trim the upper cabinet to get it to fit in. Now, who should I believe? The spec sheets from Kitchenaid and my measuring tape or you who obviously made a mistake in claiming a 33% space loss and just won't admit it.
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 06:25:36 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

one in

I was guessing at 36" deep vs. 24". It's really 33" vs. 28", not that much difference. However, that wasn't *your* argument. As long as we're bringing up stuff from the past, you said "They make up for the depth by being taller", which is laughably stupid.

Again, if there is only a 10% difference on the inside, they're wasting space on the standard models or have less insulation (likely) on the cabinet depth models. Physics doesn't lie.

Four == 15%. You can't have it smaller on the outside and bigger on the inside. Period.

Ok, $400 more for 85% of the fridge. Didn't happen. BTW, that's the second time she made the exact same decision.

Are they taller to make up for it. Good grief, you're dense.

They're 10-15% shallower, not taller to make up for it, as one idiot here claimed. Capiche? (yourself)
<snipped repetitive drivel>
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On May 29, 9:26 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

You're the fool that claimed counterdepth units were 2/3 the capacity of standard fridges.. I correctly pointed out from the first post that counterdepth units only vary a couple cft from similar regular units. Now that you've finallly woken up, you admit that even in the case of Electrolux, which is your total universe, they only vary by less than 15%. I showed you Kitchenaid units that vary by 10%. Neither of those is anywhere near your claimed 33%. So, I wouldn't be calling others stupid.
And I've already shown you that Kitchenaid as an example makes a counterdepth unit that is 71 inches tall versus 68-5/8 for a standard unit. So clearly some are taller which makes up for some of the difference. It's entirely up to the manufacturer what they want to do. I have that 71 inch Kitchenaid sitting in my kitchen.

You're so full of crap, it's unbelievable. I showed you that even with the Electrolux line, they have models that are within 10% of each other. You claim those are "crippled". What an unbelievable imbecile to think that manufacturers like Electrolux and Kitchenaid are going to "cripple" the vast majority of their product line, ie deliberately making those units with less volume, just so the comparison with the counterdepth units will look better.

I don't know WTF you're talking about now. The actual data sheets show counterdepth units vary from 2 to 4 cft less in capacity from the similar std units. That's pretty damn close to my claim that you only lose a couple cft of space going to counterdepth. And it's miles away from your stupid claim that you lose 1/3 the volume. That would be 33% for you since you appear to be math challenged.

If you had just looked at the Electrolux data sheet after my post, you could have said that then and avoided just digging yourself deeper and deeper into a foolish hole.

Who the hell cares. So, you're to cheap to spend $400 to keep the fridge from sticking out into the kitchen. The point is the OP shouldn't be mislead by your claim that counterdepth units are 2/3's the space of standard units.

Look fool. These were my exact words:
"Don't know which ones you compared, but in my experience they were almost the same in cubic feet, just a couple cft less. They make up for the depth by being taller. "
Kitchenaid has standard units that are 68 5/8. They have counterdepths that are 71. Those units differ by a mere 2 cft, so yes they make up some of the usable volume by the counterdepth being taller. Technically Electrolux does the same thing with their French door units. They are 3/8 taller than the standard unit. Since you're the one arguing physics rather than manufacturer's data sheets, last time I checked, 70 is indeed taller than 69 5/8. Electrolux also makes the French door counterdepth ones 3/8" wider as well, again helping keep the units as close in volume as possible. Capiche?

My exact words in context, in the very first post:
"Don't know which ones you compared, but in my experience they were almost the same in cubic feet, just a couple cft less. They make up for the depth by being taller. "
Your very first post:
"= "We were going to buy a Electrolux to fit into a tight space but SWMBO finally decided she didn't want to pay several hundred more for 2/3s the 'fridge. The fridge sticking into the traffic pattern isn't the best"
Everyone can judge for themselve who the idiot is here.
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Recently purchased a Whirlpool side/side counter depth in Stainless. Flush with the cabinets and counter top and seems to blend right in. No appreciable loss of interior storage. Got it at Lowes for a pretty good price ($899 on sale - free delivery)
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Try telling that to krw. He claims you lose 33% of your space by going to counterdepth. You actually lose 10% to 15%, but like you from a practical standpoint I did not notice a difference. But also like you, I notice a BIG difference in not having the fridge sticking out into the kitchen. It looks, finished, almost built-in.
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 06:28:34 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

You lose the same space as the cabinet depth is shallower. That's a *fact*. Pay more, get less.
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On May 29, 9:27 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

That's a lie. You can't take a standard fridge, just pull the door off, cut the cabinet down and put it back together. Well, maybe you can because you're clearly living in your own little world.
For the rest of us, when you compare actual fridges, that you can buy you can find similar counterdepth ones available that are 10 to 15% of the volume of std ones. Not 33% less as you claimed. And some of those make up part of the space lost in going counterdepth by being taller and/or wider. The 71" Kitchenaid sitting in my kitchen, being an example. Or those Frenchdoor units at Electolux that are 3/8" taller and 3/8" inch wider than the comparable std fridge.
Why do you just keep digging your hole deeper?
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They do cost more and have less space, but there's one more thing to think about: Door swing.
In some kitchens, where the fridge is near a wall, think about the where the hinge line of the door will be. I couldn't put a counter depth fridge in because the right side door wouldn't be able to open all the way. A regular french-door fridge allowed the fridge door to open fully into the kitchen entryway.
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