Cotton rope

OK, here is the quick and simple. I obtained some cotton "boat rope" with the express purpose to convert segments into tug toys for two really big dogs. Cotton because what I've read says this is preferred as it does not cut the dogs gums and such.
Challenge is how to stop it from unraveling. I've tied knots at each end but it seems I need a better solution.
Anyone, perhaps those with dogs, know of a way that still maintains the healthy nature of the cotton rope?
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Get smaller dogs?
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The commercial product just has an overhand knot in them and the ends are allowed to fray. You could do what sailors call a sewn whipping where you take heavy sail thread, take several wraps around the line and weave between the lay of the line.
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You cannot stop it from unraveling.
I would suggest you look into other newsgroups that deal with dogs.
When you go to buy pet toys, what type of rope is used MOST COMMONLY for pet toys?
I do know that things that can come off in large chunks can choke dogs, like the knots on the end of those rawhide bones. Some look like it is one strip, but it is three, and the knotted ends can come off after wetting, and cause choking.
As a person very experienced with rope, I would say that organic based fiber ropes would be a better bet for coming off and going into a dog's stomach. AND THAT IS A LITTLE AT A TIME. Any large chunk of anything would be bad. Organic fiber is digested, partially digested, or just eliminated by staying in the digestive tract long enough to go out the other end. With synthetic fiber ropes, there is no degrading, and it is not digested.
Now, that brings us to hair balls. Hair is organic, coming right from the animal. But hair balls will cause problems for dogs and cats, accumulating in their digestive systems until a blockage is formed. One would think that a little hair at a time would go in one end and out the other. But anyone who has found a mysterious deposit left by a cat or dog will tell you that it stays until it forms a big ball, and then is upchucked by the animal, or the animal has symptoms that would lead a reasonable person to take the animal to the vet.
So, it is not a simple issue. I would read up by googling, asking a vet, looking at what's for sale at pet stores (although that may be a bad guide), and using common sense.
With my dog and cat, there are points where play toys just get to such a shape that it is obvious that they are coming apart, and I will toss them rather than letting them shred it and choke.
Also, controlling the time the pet can have it can have a big effect. If they can lay there and chew on it all day, it is apparent that they will ingest more of the fibers than if they can just play with it for an hour, and then it is taken away and put up on a shelf.
HTH
Steve
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On 10/11/2010 7:02 PM, Steve B wrote:

How about hemp rope, the doggie chews on it, gets stoned and calms down?
..............SQUIRREL!
TDD
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Steve B wrote:

Manila is hemp, sisal isn't.
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hemp?

We worked with both in commercial diving. They are very similar except when it comes to water exposure and strength. They looked a lot alike, and I thought they were just different grades or refinement of the same thing.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

Nope. And although hemp was/is(?) used to make rope it isn't manila rope...that's made from abaca. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://kickinteractive.com/dc/units/1_1/images/manilaSisal.gif&imgrefurl=http://kickinteractive.com/dc/units/1_1/natural.html&usg=__87QVQyl5Se6fbrMBdmxF23YXVnY=&h36&wP9&sz &hl=en&start=7&zoom=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=4wJdUpMwnw-zbM:&tbnh&tbnw1&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dmanila%2Brope%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26tbs%3Disch:1
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On 10/11/2010 6:31 PM, Jim wrote:

Dip the ends in wax, and tie the knots while it is still a little soft? Waxed cotton twine is what Ma Bell/military used for lacing up wiring for many decades. (Some of the more traditional military techs still do.) Only other thing that comes to mind is get a sailmakers needle (the big curved one), and stitch the ends appropriately. Mebbe the boy scout (or sea scout?) manual shows the proper technique. I assume this is not the style of rope weave where you can put the end of the rope back into itself, Chinese finger trap style?
Dammit, you got me curious. (Googles)
Try this: http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-3185/ANSI-3926web.pdf
This was on the first page, but there were lotsa hits for a search string of 'how to keep cotton rope from unraveling on the cut ends'.
--
aem sends...

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Jim wrote:

Back plait it (like a backwards short splice) and bury the ends. Ditto with rose and crown.
The dogs will still probably get the ends loose, just cut off the fringe.
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On Mon, 11 Oct 2010 22:31:12 +0000, Jim wrote:

We get ones that are supposed to freshen their breath, too - they seem to work really well. Local farm supply place sells them for about 4 bucks each - the rope's a lot thicker (around an inch) than most rope toys that places like Target etc. sell.
They last a few months, unlike every other toy that we've had. Weather seems to end up being the killer - dog-face takes 'em outside via the doggie door and the damp makes the rope rot. The knots at the ends are somehow inter-woven, I think, rather than just being a simple knot.
Just saying, in case you decide to give up and look for something ready- made :-)
cheers
Jules
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I'm not clear on what the problem is - is it that the knots come undone? Or does it unravel between the knots? If it its the knots coming undone, try soaking the rope then tying the knots while it's wet. -- H
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Tie 2 knots near the ends of a maybe 16" piece and let the ends fray, my rope for dogs has lasted maybe 10 years.
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wrote:

Tie 2 knots near the ends of a maybe 16" piece and let the ends fray, my rope for dogs has lasted maybe 10 years.
Reply: Yes, no, absolutely, maybe, and I don't know. It depends on the dog. I have had dogs where chew toys would last a year. Another dog would have it shredded or consumed in a week or less. Age has a lot to do with it, as dogs under two years old tend to chew a lot more until they get their full set of teeth. But yes, tie two firm knots. If you have a long piece of rope, it is worth using it, tying two knots about a foot apart, then tying the ends off and pulling it even hooked to a ball on a car hitch to make it "seize hard" in rope talk. This just gives a knot that the dog will not be able to undo. From there on a tight knot, the frazzles are so small it won't make much difference. If they get the end of the knot undone, entanglement in their teeth is possible, particularly with fine nylon rope, and they will be able to bite off longer pieces and ingest.. I have seen 5" nylon hawser mooring line part, and there is a 10' diameter puff ball of small nylon particles.. It's pretty spectacular, and loud. And watch out for the flying ends, soaked with seawater, they are like getting hit by a falling tree.
Has anyone checked what those sold in the pet departments are made of? They seem soft, and from what I've seen would guess they were cotton.
Steve
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A piece of string walked into a bar, adn asked for a drink. The bartender sternly said "We don't serve string here." The piece of string argued, but didn't get served.
So, the piece of string stepped out to the street. Tied itself into a knot, and then anoher knot. And yet another knot. Then, it frizzed up what string was extending out from the end.
Back into the bar. Bartender says "Aren't you that piece of string I just refused? String replys "I'm a frayed not!"
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On Oct 13, 4:53am, "Stormin Mormon"

Err...you meant "I'm a frayed KNOT"?

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