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wrote:

If you want to hear extreme English you need to experience Pidgin English or Nigerian English.
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harry wrote:

Ah, yes. Niuginian indigene (we used to call them "New Guineans") describing piano: "Im e big-pella box, you itim teeth e cry out."
Or an inhabitant of the same country, having seen both a food mixer in the missionary's kitchen and the Missionary Aviation Fellowship fixed-wing aircraft but seeing the MAF helicopter for the first time: "Mixmaster blong Jesus Christ."
Perce
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Now that depends exactly where you are and context. "Knocked up" means (a) Beat the door to arouse me from sleep. (b) To get pregnant. Depends on the locality.
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And "Humping" means something totally different!
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wrote:> What you call kerosine in the USA we in the UK call paraffin.

And when the kids in school ask for a rubber nobody stares, it means eraser <<<<<
Americans call petrol, or benzine, gas. Some cars can run on gas, you know real gas. That does confuse.
Or pick-up when they mean collect.
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wrote:

Some know-it-all types confuse Petrol (Gasoline) with benzine. To wit:
Petroleum ether, also known as benzine, VM&P Naphtha, Petroleum Naphtha, Naphtha ASTM, Petroleum Spirits, X4 or Ligroin, is a group of various volatile, highly flammable, liquid hydrocarbon mixtures used chiefly as nonpolar solvents.
Petroleum ether is obtained from petroleum refineries as the portion of the distillate which is intermediate between the lighter naphtha and the heavier kerosene. It has a specific gravity of between 0.6 and 0.8 depending on its composition. The following distillation fractions of petroleum ether are commonly available: 30 to 40 C, 40 to 60 C, 60 to 80 C, 80 to 100 C and sometimes 100 to 120 C. The 60 to 80 C fraction is often used as a replacement for hexane. Petroleum ether is mostly used by pharmaceutical companies in the manufacturing process. Petroleum ether consists mainly of pentane, and is sometimes used instead of pentane due to its lower cost. Petroleum ether is not technically an ether.[1]
Benzine should not be confused with benzene. Benzine is a mixture of alkanes, e.g., pentane, hexane, and heptane, whereas benzene is a cyclic, aromatic hydrocarbon, C6H6. Likewise, petroleum ether should not be confused with the class of organic compounds called ethers, which contain the -O- functional group.
During the Second World War some extermination camps experimented by killing people with benzine injections.
So before you open your piss ignorant pie hole to cast aspersions you had better be sure you are correct.
--


Don Thompson

Stolen from Dan: "Just thinking, besides, I watched 2 dogs mating once,
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"Benzine" is German for petrol. Gasolino in Spanish. Essence in French. Gas in USA. Petrol is short for petroleum spirit. ie distilled, fossilised oil. Which sounds perfectly logical to me and causes no confusion. I expect Goethe would have known this.
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Bruce in alaska wrote:

ISTR this is even true with pipelines. When company 'A' puts several thousands of barrels of #1 'into' the pipeline company's head end, the pipeline company will deliver the same number of barrels out the end point without actually trying to calculate transport time or any such. The fuel that goes into company A's tank could have just as easily been put in by another company shipping the same product.
As it is a totally fungible commodity, the pipeline company just logs how many barrels in one end and that many barrels belong to company 'A' at the other end.
But as far as #1, truck fuel, and aviation, is it still all the same now that road diesel has to be that special (more expensive) ultra-low sulfur stuff? Or is home heating oil (#1) and aviation jet fuel also ultra-low sulfur now?
daestrom
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wrote:

My mother ran out of heating oil and asked if I could bring her some. I didn't have a barrel, but the oil distributor said he had an empty I could borrow. When I got there he was filling it with #2 pump diesel. The same stuff you would put in your diesel pickup or tractor. He said it was the same stuff and my mother's furnace ran just fine.
Richard W.
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Thre are two sorts of heating oil. 25 sec and 35sec. (That's how we measure the viscosity in the UK.) 25sec (kerosine) is for vapourising burners. [Basically a big wick] 35 sec (= to diesel) for pressure jet burners. 25 sec can be burnt in a petrol engine. However the engine needs to be hot before it will run. In days of yore some agricultural tractors ran on this (known as Tractor Vapourising Oil). They had two tanks, you started the tractor on petrol & then switch over to the kerosine / TVO Smelly exhaust.
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wrote:

I have seen some of those tractors, but the more common one is the International which is started on gas and switched over to diesel when it got warm. Some of those engines are fairly large.
Richard W.
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I think I heard that started during world war two. When gasoline was rationed, but kerosene was much easier available.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

When you say 'gas', do you mean ( liquid petroleum / natural etc ) gas or gasoline ? We solve this confusion in the UK by calling gasoline 'petrol' ( from 'petroleum' ). Petrol, gas and diesel engined vehicles all operate on our roads.
Graham
and to the MORMOM, please don't 'top post' since most people prefer to see a post that starts with thee question and finishes with the answer or follow-up comment.
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On Sat, 25 Jul 2009 05:03:10 +0100, Eeyore wrote:

And you are easily confused.

Also blind user readers need bottom posting.
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Michael Dobony wrote:

You're one to talk, polluting the audio groups with your ignorance.
Gas = gas = liquid petroleum gas or liquid natural gas in my book ( for automotive applications ).
Only US retards use gas to mean petrol.
Graham
btw do think Pacific Gas and Electric runs filling stations ?
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On Sat, 25 Jul 2009 05:03:10 +0100, in alt.energy.homepower, Eeyore

Why not just call it gasoline? Calling it "petrol" is just as stupid as calling it "gas".
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Scott wrote:

Calling it 'gasoline' would be fine, as I do when myself when chatting with US residents. Calling it 'GAS' is NUTS. A GAS is a GAS not a liquid.
Graham
p.s. why are Americans so retarded ?
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Eeyore wrote:

Probably due to the same thing that causes Brits to think that automobiles have wings...
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cj wrote:

And what do you call them ? Want to argue over bumper / fender too? The fact is that GAS is not a LIQUID. Ever heard of a 'phase diagram' ? SOLID, LIQUID, GAS
Graham
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On Wed, 29 Jul 2009 13:11:42 +0100, against all advice, something
say:

What is it about Brits and their compulsion to argue? Gas, in context, is obviously a shortened name for gasoline. I can't believe you don't understand that, and must conclude that you are arguing for the sake of argument.
What's up with that?
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