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You can add paraffin (kerosine) to diesel to stop it gelling in cold weather. (Mix thoroughly). As well as visible water in fuel there can be dissolved water. For most applications this doesn't matter. However in extremely low temperatures ice can form so blocking small jets/apertures. This can't be filtered out but there is a filterlike device that chemically removes dissolved water in fuel. They use them on airfields, usually adjacent to the regular filters. Ocassionally you see a combined device.
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harry wrote:

I think maybe you meant add kerosene to lower the amount of parafin? Parafin is what is responsible for the gelling effect.

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What you call kerosine in the USA we in the UK call paraffin. Like hoods & bonnets. Bumpers & fenders. Trunks & boots. :-)
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harry wrote:

That's the kind of thing that causes plane crashes and running out of fuel in mid flight. Gallons? I thought you meant liters.
TDD
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wrote:

No, he meant _litres_! ;^)
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And when the kids in school ask for a rubber nobody stares, it means eraser
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ransley wrote:

In the U.S., "rubbers" used to commonly mean "rubber overshoes".
TDD
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ransley wrote:

Or butts and bums.

"Two great nations divided by a common language" (George Bernard Shaw? Winston Churchill?)
But problems may arise in other varieties of English too. I had not been in Australia long when I heard somebody ask for some Durex. In UK, as in USA, Durex was/is a common brand of condom. Perhaps Durex condoms did exist in Australia too, but it was also the brand of a widely used adhesive tape (a local equivalent of "Scotch tape" -- or "Sellotape" for the Brits; does the latter still exist?).
Perce (dual-citizen OzBrit -- aka "whingeing Pommie bastard" -- in exile in US Midwest)
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One of my favorite stories, was the English man in US during the war. He was on the phone. The operator came on, asked if he was through. He said yes, so she disconnected him. He was storming about that over breakfast the next day. His host found the problem.
For the English, Through = connected. Are you "through to your party yet?". In America, Through = compelted. "Are you through with your call?"
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sat, 25 Jul 2009 21:04:22 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

And don't even start with "knock you up"
... that is not a Palin joke.
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I'm told of an English gentleman who left strict instructions for the desk in NYC, but he was a bit surprised who was at his door the next morning. Strumpets! Tea and strumpets, you see.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sat, 25 Jul 2009 21:04:22 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-BvkW_Xp88

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In the USAF an airplane that is ready to fly is "In" - (in commission) One that is not ready to fly is "Out" (out of commission) One which is flying is "Up" One which has landed is "Down"
In the US Navy an airplane that is ready to fly is "Up" (ie, up on the carrier deck) One which is not ready is "Down" (ie, down below on the hangar deck)
The Canadian forces keep their aircraft hangared, so in the Canadian forces an airplane that is ready to fly is "Out" (ie, outside) One which is not ready to fly is "In" (In the hangar).
To compound the problem, at one time I was on exchange with the Canadian Forces, with the rank of Captain There was a Canadian Group Captain on exchange with the USAF. We both landed at Winnipeg flying T-33s, -- but the Canadian was flying a USAF T-33, and the American was flying a Canadian T-33 -- and we both had the same last name! And then my airplane - the Canadian airplane - broke and needed maintenance. Confusing the last names, the ground crew made the logical assumption that the Canadian airplane was being flown by the Canadian pilot, and called the group captain to tell him his aircraft was not flyable. I walked in wearing my USAF flight suit and asked if my airplane was "In," meaning in commission. Thinking I wanted the USAF airplane they told me my aircraft had been serviced and was ready to fly, so I went to ops, prepared and filed a flight plan, then headed to the flight line. The ground crew had a crewchief stationed at the American airplane ready to start, but I was looking for the Canadian airplane and couldn't find it. When I went back to maintenance to find my airplane they still thought I was looking for the USAF airplane and they told me it was "out." (outside) but I thought it was "out" (of commission), I said "You had told me it was "In" (commission)" and they replied, "No, it's the Canadian T-33 that's In (for maintenance). The American T-33 is "Out" (outside.)".
Me: "Wait a minute, I'm Capt. Jones -- I'm flying the Canadian T-33. Who's flying the American T-33?" Maintenance: "I thought you were flying the American airplane, which is out. Group Captain Jones is flying the Canadian T-33, and right now it's in." Me: "No, I brought in the Canadian T-33 and the last I heard it was out, but you just told me it's in. Maintenance: "Sir, the Canadian T-bird IS in, and it'll stay in until we get a replacement pitot head. The American T-bird is out but Group Captain Jones hasn't shown up so we may bring it back in."
Abbot and Costello would have been proud of us --
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That's a funny story. You never know if you're talking to a brick wall, or if the person sees three heads on your shoulders.
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Or my lovely young English friend, just arrived in the states, who asked if she could borrow my rubber. -- Doug
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you're taking the piss
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Long long ago, far, far away... my English girl friend never could get used to Americans saying they were "stuffed" following a large meal or, for that matter, the expression "Stuffed Shirt".
--
PeteCresswell

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My friend Jack, visiting Australia. Finished a meal, pushed away and announced "I'm full!". The Aussies started laughing. Finally he figured out that "I'm full" was slang for "I'm pregnant".
--
Christopher A. Young
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Or the time I met a pretty girl in Holy Loch Scotland. She told me I should "Come 'round tomorrow and knock me up." Being 'knocked up' over there has an entirely different meaning than in the States :-)
daestrom
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You did better than me! To me, those Holy Loch girls may as well have been speaking Swahili. Couldn't understand a word they were saying. Strangely, I quickly figured out that it was only a one-way problem; they could understand me just fine. I guess it was the USA'n TV shows and movies that they were always watching.
Boy! This thread is really drifting around.
Vaughn
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