Costco bananas don't seem to ever ripen (what's the trick)?

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Hey, all...
I don't see what the problem is! I let green bananas ripen on the counter until they're just the way I like them, then I put them in the frig. They don't stay yellow of course -- they start to go almost black -- but they re main perfect for eating for many days! (As they darken they're not the pre ttiest to place in a bowl and serve to company of course -- ha ha.)
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Francis C. wrote:

UPDATE: 2 weeks later
a. I bought 4 DelMonte banana plastic bags at Costco (Sunday 3/30) b. I put a ripe apple in two & a yellow banana in one. c. One of the apple banana bags ripened (and has subsequently been eaten) d. I added MORE APPLES to the one bag (including the magic apple) e. I removed the now-wholly-brown ripening banana (which had failed) f. Now it's exactly two weeks later
March 29th:

April 1st:

April 7th:

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On Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:35:23 PM UTC-7, Francis C. wrote:

I found this thread looking for what the heck happened to my costco bananas ! Bought them green - left them in the bag - today they all looked nicely rip e. I picked up the bag and water poured out - I thought someone spilled som ething on them - but NO - they were really - not brown and totally mush - like they had been frozen and then microwaved or something!
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I am leery of much of Costco fruit.
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On Thursday, July 3, 2014 4:10:33 PM UTC-7, Pico Rico wrote:

I'm a devoted Trader Joe shopper, but I did get tired of their produce, so now I buy at our Co-op. Expensive (all organic, which I don't always requir e) but SO fresh and good!
We also have 4 farmer's markets in town - Wednesday, Saturday (2) and Sunda y. Again, not cheap, but guaranteed to be grown and sold by farmer -- no middl emen.
Where I do NOT buy is Whole Foods. Expensive, Yuppy style. How fresh is p roduce one doesn't know. And now they've been caught with their pants down , charging for the container when weighing out purchase, where it's suppose d to automatically deduct weight of container. Huge scandal.
HB
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On 7/3/2014 7:10 PM, Pico Rico wrote:

I'm leery of any supermarket produce. Much is now picked too soon so it ships with minimal damage, but also has minimal flavor. It is artificially ripened and never truly matures. That is the consequence of wanting watermelon in January.
My generation is going to be the last one to know what a peach or tomato is supposed to taste like.
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I'm a devoted Trader Joe shopper, but I did get tired of their produce, so now I buy at our Co-op. Expensive (all organic, which I don't always require) but SO fresh and good!
We also have 4 farmer's markets in town - Wednesday, Saturday (2) and Sunday. Again, not cheap, but guaranteed to be grown and sold by farmer -- no middlemen.
Where I do NOT buy is Whole Foods. Expensive, Yuppy style. How fresh is produce one doesn't know. And now they've been caught with their pants down, charging for the container when weighing out purchase, where it's supposed to automatically deduct weight of container. Huge scandal.
HB
-------
I am ready to go back to Europe, just for the fruit.
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It isn't fresh. I bought things there a few times only to have them be bad by the following day.
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On 7/18/2014 1:55 AM, Julie Bove wrote:

How fresh is fresh? Most of the crap in supermarkets is picked too soon so it is shelf stable, but tasteless. Sure, the ripe stuff goes bad faster but used in a timely fashion, it is full of flavor.
It has been years since I had a good banana. Melons from the farmer's makrket are good, but the ones in supermarkets are nasty. The grapes from Chile are picked too soon and not as sweet as they should be, but they have to survive the long trip.
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I'm a devoted Trader Joe shopper, but I did get tired of their produce,

I try not to buy any produce there. It's usually funky in some way. One can't go for quality and cheap prices both. I also don't like the way these sell their own brands. There's no way to know the source and the source doesn't have to worry about their reputation. A good example: A while back there was a salmonella recall on products from a wholesaler in the Midwest, called Big Nut. Among the list of low-end products being recalled was Trader Joes peanut butter.
While I don't particularly trust Whole Foods, I find their produce is generally better than other supermarkets, if only because their clientelle want it that way. For instance, right now they have those monstrous Driscoll's robo-berries and they don't even have any garlic from the US. They also don't have any truly edible tomatoes, despite prices up to $6.50/pound. On the other hand, they have local strawberries from an identified grower, and delicious, local, organic lettuce. ...But if I actually had access to a decent co-op I suspect I'd do as you do.
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How do you know there's no way to know the source. Have you ever asked?
A while back I was looking at the chicken at BJ's. They sell Perdue labeled chicken and BJ's labeled chicken. I located the butcher and asked him what the difference was. "Just the packaging, and of course, the price."
They get all of their chicken from Perdue, some of it pre-packaged by Perdue, and some of it bulk, which they then package themselves and sell for a lower price.
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On 07/03/2014 10:42 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yum! Perdue chicken are the best!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=mlrdr2jHV1A

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On Thursday, July 3, 2014 7:42:09 PM UTC-7, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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I NEVER NEVER buy"Southern chickens" -- with apologies to my Southern frien ds. Perdue is a no-no, both because of dubious quality of product and bad treat ment of employees, and because of their political stance. It's my money, a nd I'll spend it where I choose. Preferably where the growers do not bruta lize the chickens. Happens in most states; the growers pay off legislators to oppose every effort to provide reasonable conditions for these helpless creatures.
If you ever chose to research that situation, you would be shocked.
Though I don't always buy "organic" I certainly prefer to buy local chicken s from farmers that are allowed to sell at farmers markets because they fol low best practices.
HB
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| > I'm a devoted Trader Joe shopper, but I did get tired of their produce, | >> | > | > I try not to buy any produce there. It's usually | > funky in some way. One can't go for quality and cheap | > prices both. I also don't like the way these sell their | > own brands. There's no way to know the source and | > the source doesn't have to worry about their reputation. | | How do you know there's no way to know the source. Have you ever asked? |
Who would one ask? A clerk may answer, but that doesn't mean they know. I've never tried writing to TJ. Maybe they'd answer. I don't know. But that would seem to be in conflict with the whole idea of store brands, which is that the source company doesn't have to answer to the customer and can therefore charge the store less. A Sears sewing machine might be made by Singer or it might be made by Ace & Acme, but for all practical purposes it's a Sears machine.
Most Trader Joes processed products say only "distributed by Trader Joes". I suspect that Big Nut doesn't want their name connected because then people would send complaints to them. I would guess that's probably part of the contract.
Even if the source is known, it would make sense that their product is higher quality than the store brand. If a company also sells retail then their reputation depends on their product, but not on the stock they sell through a store brand. There can also be other minor issues, not immediately apparent. For instance, Whole Foods brand organic diced tomatoes are cheaper than the name brand on the next shelf. They both say organic. But the name brand (Muir Glen) also says there's no BPA in the can liner. The WF brand does not. WF is a giant corporation that bought out smaller stores to build a massive chain. they're a middleman, not a food producer. So they don't care about issues like BPA in can liners unless the customer cares -- even when the content is organic! So there's two cans of tomatoes. They might even both be Muir Glen tomatoes. But one has BPA in the can liner. And it's pretty safe to assume that if Muir Glen is selling tomatoes to WF they're not sending them the best ones. That's why the store brand is cheaper, after all.
| A while back I was looking at the chicken at BJ's. They sell Perdue labeled | chicken and BJ's labeled chicken. I located the butcher and asked him what | the difference was. "Just the packaging, and of course, the price." | | They get all of their chicken from Perdue, some of it pre-packaged by | Perdue, and some of it bulk, which they then package themselves and sell | for a lower price.
That makes sense. Perdue practically owns the market at this point. But the clerk's word is not a promise, and BJs could easily start getting chicken from China next month. They've made no commitment to you about where they source their chicken. If they start getting it from a farm in China built on a mercury waste dump you'll probably never know. Nor is the clerk likely to learn about it. For that matter, they can say it's organic if China certifies that. But we have no agreement with China in terms of organic regulations. And who, in their right mind, would trust Chinese gov't officials to confirm organic food products being shipped to the US? They don't even care about their own people.
Personally I would never buy Perdue at any price. One reason is their exploitation. There was a PBS documentary about how they treat their suppliers. Another reason is the chicken itself. It's not right. It's got globs of yellow fat under the skin and the fat is sticky, tearing apart paper napkins. There are also veins that seem to be in weird places. If you try normal chicken, like Bell and Evans, I think you'll find it tastes much better and the fat it greasy, just like it always was growing up. :) There are also no fat globs under the skin in normal chicken.
I wouldn't eat industrial beef, either, because that's likely to be far worse than chicken. (A single hamburger can come from dozens of countries, unloaded from ships as meat chunks in bins, then shipped to the Midwest suppliers for grinding. Yum.) But in the case of beef I can't honestly say that I think organic tastes better. I'd only buy it to avoid a big dose of female hormones, mad cow prions, and who knows what else might be in it. In the case of chicken I can see and taste the difference clearly.
If you're on a tight budget you might have to go for industrial food, but I would keep in mind that their market is people who care most, by far, about price. Or to put it another way, if you don't want to know how sausage is made, then you won't. :)
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On 7/4/2014 10:15 AM, Mayayana wrote:

You are making assumptions with no backup. Just because the can does not state anything about BPA you cannot say it has it. May or may not and if it does not, their lawyers would have a lot of fun with you.
Your assumption that they are not sending "the best ones" is wrong also. I've had involvement in the private label industry in the past. Most often, it is identical. No better, no worse, exactly the same. There are exceptions both ways though.
I was in a soda bottling plant a couple of months ago and watched a change over of labels while the same flavoring syrup continued to flow. OTOH, they also produced a premium flavor for another brand that sold for more than their own.
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| You are making assumptions with no backup. Just because the can does | not state anything about BPA you cannot say it has it.
I assume for my purposes that it has BPA because it doesn't say otherwise. Why not? These are cans of organic tomatoes. I'm paying extra for good quality. If the WF version is not using BPA they'd be crazy not to say that. If the other brand says non-BPA I'll buy that instead. Many of the WF customers care. In fact, more people probably care about BPA than about organic. It's a less controversial issue.
If you really want to research it, here's a link I found in a few seconds:
http://bpafreecannedfood.wordpress.com/bpa-free-canned-food-brands/
It says that as of 2012 WF was using about 27% non-BPA cans, claiming that they can't get more. But it sounds like you don't really want to know. You're one of those people who prefers not to know how the sausage is made. And such people get annoyed when someone tells them, because it complicates their life.
| Your assumption that they are not sending "the best | ones" is wrong also. I've had involvement in the private | label industry in the past. Most often, it is identical.
So you say. But you're the same person who doesn't care about BPA in cans, aren't you? :)
There may be truth in what you're saying, but again it makes sense for my purposes to assume lower quality. The actual food producer does not have their name on the product. It's a matter of simple common sense and human nature that if they can fulfill their contract with lesser quality stock -- saving the better stock for their own label -- then they would do that. Wouldn't you? You've grown 3 truckloads of tomatoes. Shaws wants to buy one for their store brand. One truckload is a bit funky, from a poorly producing field, but certainly good enough for market, while the other two truckloads are extremely good. Do you send one of the better truckloads to Shaws? (There's no such thing as identical when it comes to fresh food.)
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On 7/4/2014 12:10 PM, Mayayana wrote:

You said it does. You do not know that for sure. Yes, you can be cautious and not buy them, but you cannot be sure it has something just because it does not say it is free of it. Many things say "gluten free" but not everything that does not say that has gluten in it.
These are cans of

Perhaps, but getting the labels changed takes time too. We don't have facts to make statements, only conjecture.

I make my own sausage and I know exactly what goes into it. I would prefer non-bps cans, but I don't get too excited about the few cans a month we do use.

Where did I say I don't care? You lose credibility what you say things like that. You just make up what suits you at the time regardless of the truth.

It gets even funnier as you go on with assumption. Do you think the label on the can means it was produced and packed by them? Many of the name brand items you buy are produced by the independents and third party canners. Same big vat, many labels.
You've grown 3 truckloads of tomatoes. Shaws

Depends on who I'm packing for today. Chances are, I'd mix the three together and start canning.
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Interesting coincidence.... Your post got me curious about the BPA issue. It turns out it's harder to avoid BPA in cans than I thought. I don't buy much in cans, so I haven't paid much attention to it, but apparently tomatoes are an especially relevant item:
From 2013 http://www.oregonlive.com/foodday/index.ssf/2013/07/bpa_in_canned_food.html ---------
Sara O'Leary, a healthy eating specialist and a registered dietitian at Whole Foods Market in Vancouver, says that while she hasn't received many customer inquiries about BPA-free packaging, she likes to point out specific brands when she conducts store tours or talks with customers about making healthier food choices.
The only current product line that's completely BPA-free is Eden Organic, though individual products from Wild Planet, Westbrae Natural and Muir Glen have BPA-free packaging.
"If you're only going to worry about BPA with one thing, focus on tomatoes," O'Leary says. "Due to their high acidity, they encourage the leaching of BPA into the food. So I point customers to diced tomatoes or sauces from Eden or Muir Glen."
----------------
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| It gets even funnier as you go on with assumption. Do you think the | label on the can means it was produced and packed by them? Many of the | name brand items you buy are produced by the independents and third | party canners. Same big vat, many labels.
That's a good point. I know WF brand is not their own. I can be fairly confident that Muir Glen produces and packs their own. But there are a lot of "quality" food companies that have been bought up to cash in on the reputation. Toms, HaagenDas, SmartFood, etc. One just has to make one's best judgement based on available information. I don't see anything silly about that.
| You've grown 3 truckloads of tomatoes. Shaws | > wants to buy one for their store brand. One truckload | > is a bit funky, from a poorly producing field, but certainly | > good enough for market, while the other two truckloads | > are extremely good. Do you send one of the better | > truckloads to Shaws? (There's no such thing as identical | > when it comes to fresh food.) | | Depends on who I'm packing for today. Chances are, I'd mix the three | together and start canning. | You're not canning. You're selling a truckload to Shaws, and they'll be perfectly happy with the worst batch, while what you keep will go under your own label. You're going to mix the truckloads? I doubt that very much.
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when grapes FIRST appeared from Chile, they were incredibly delicious! We're talking so much sugar they actually stuck together sometimes. Like vine ripened. incredible, but within a year the FDA found BAD grapes from Chile which staunched that flow. The adulterated grapes turned out to be two shriveled grapes that had been injected with strichnine. hmmm...yeah that happens a lot in nature. Well, after that, the grapes coming in from Chile started tasting EXACTLY like the grapes form elsewhere. Picked too green, no flavour, etc. But at least for one season we found some produce, albeit at Safeway, that tasted like it should.
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