Cost to install a new gas dryer (old one broke)

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Hi,
My wife had a plumber come out to hook up a new gas dryer. We have an old one that broke, so all the lines are in place, it is just a matter of disconnecting the old one and connnecting the new. No extras, like hauling away the old dryer. The cost blew me away:
Disconnect dryer: $164.24 Install gas dryer: $282.25 Total: $446.49
This seems absoutely insane to me. I would've done it myself, but unlike water or electricity, gas scares me. Is this anywhere close to reasonable, or should I make a stink?
We live in suburban Washington DC, Bethesda MD to be exact, if locality matters for this sort of thing.
Thanks,
Mike.
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Hi,
My wife had a plumber come out to hook up a new gas dryer. We have an old one that broke, so all the lines are in place, it is just a matter of disconnecting the old one and connnecting the new. No extras, like hauling away the old dryer. The cost blew me away:
Disconnect dryer: $164.24 Install gas dryer: $282.25 Total: $446.49
This seems absoutely insane to me. I would've done it myself, but unlike water or electricity, gas scares me. Is this anywhere close to reasonable, or should I make a stink?
We live in suburban Washington DC, Bethesda MD to be exact, if locality matters for this sort of thing.
Thanks,
Mike.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Around here you now need a special license to install gas appliances, so the price has shot up. But >$400 still sounds high to me.
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You could have easily installed the dryer yourself. An employee in the plumbing department at Home Depot could have set you up with the tools and supplies that you needed. There is no reason that gas should scare you. You do the work, turn on the gas, and if you smell an leakage, you deal with it and move on. What can a plumber do that you can't? Gas has to have a narrow ration to air to be flammable. You would have to have quite a bit to be dangerous, and by then you would get sick of the smell.
Really old gas appliances used to be hard-piped to the gas supply. This might have inflated your cost if it meant modifying this. But if there was an existing flexible connector, you could have just transferred it to the new appliance, or maybe replaced the connector with an updated one. The secret to a good seal is using gas-rated teflon tape or a sealing paste. Again, someone at a hardware store could have helped you, and watched you practice on a spare piece of pipe if they had one lying around. One key to loosening or tightening the connections is to hold one side stable with a pipe wrench or another tool, while turning the other side with another tool; that way you don't turn both side and loosen something else down the line.
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Removal of my 10 year old dryer was very difficult. The sealant they used was like glue.

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wrote:

That's interesting; around here you need a license for water, but anyone can do gas. Anyhow, it can't take more than 15 minutes to take the old one out, and 45 minutes to put one in. Even allowing an hour for transportation, that is $220 an hour. Shop around; if you can't find a better price, do it yourself.
Funny think about gas; it is actually easier than water since the pressure is so low. Leaks are easy to spot with soapy water. And if you screw it up, the odor is noticable at much lower levels than are dangerous. You would have to almost try to do it dangerously.
Now... this all assumes you have a shut off at the dryer. If you don't, it is rather more difficult.
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On the other hand, he didn't break anything, didn't track tar on your new white carpet, and didn't abuse your wife or your dog. And you've got to remember that, no matter how it's broken down on the bill, the first $100 is just to show up in the first place. And the plumber is trying to pay for a house and shop in Bethesda, too, so you can't really expect Dixville Notch type prices.
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Lived in one area where final gas connection to anything had to be done by the gas company only.
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Probably can get a cert course for $446.49
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Get some other quotes. Maybe check out the supplier from whom you purchased the new dryer.
Unless forbidden by local codes, you might as well do it yourself. It's not hard. Get a new flexible connector line (don't try and reuse the old one) with the right fittings, some jointing compound (for gas) and a couple of wrenches.
Check for leaks using your nose and by painting each joint with some soapy water and looking for bubbles.
Than take the wife out for a night on the town with the $400 you just saved. I'm sure she'll find a way to thank you ;-)
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Did you at least have a good orgasm? I'd have thought $150 would be on the high side. He may have had to change a fitting or two, but the time for labor about 1 hour. Disconnecting should be just a few minutes to turn of a valve and break open the union.
Total should be maybe $15 or parts, 1/2 hour travel time, 1 hour labor. My plumber charges $65 an hour in a small town. Maybe yours was a congressman or something because a regular, no matter how shady, could not screw you as much as a politician.
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I had the gas company hook mine up. $115. I had removed the old one but they would have done that at the same price. The old one was sitting in the garage and they took it away. Sears delivered the dryer. After rebate delivery was free. Near Raleigh NC.

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And why didn't we know how much it was going to cost BEFORE authorizing the work?
Cost to install one where I live, about $20. I like to put a new flex hose any time I change a dryer, a thing of mine. I could use the old one, and then it would be free.
You said two things. Gas scares you, and you live in Bethesda MD. Those locals know girlie men are afraid of gas, and take every advantage.
Learn how to do it, or at least how to shop around, or quit kvetching.
Sheesh.
Steve
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On 11 Oct 2006 16:52:16 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I would think about $150 is about right as there is not much to the installation and it should take less than an hour. I can't expect a service call to be less than $100, then labor $50 an hour. I use pipe dope, channel locks, soapy water. There should be a cut-off valve near each gas appliance. At those prices maybe I should have been a plumber!
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As I recall, Sears charged me about $150 to install and haul away old. I live in an upscale area of Phila, and I have seen enormous inflation in all services. Plumbers who want $900 to replace 4 feet of waste pipe, painters who want $1400 to paint one bedroom 16'x16', an electrician who tried to charge $900 to replace one of my mom's curcuit breaker switches (not the box, the one switch!). They aren't stupid: they see the money flowing to the top echelon of society, and death of the Do-it-yourselfers (ore even people who cut their own grass!), and they charge what they can get away with. Did you ever wonder why they ask you for your zip code first, before any estimate? It ain't to mail you a Christmas card . . . it's to see what rate structure to impose based on the wealth of your area. So if you are elderly, or happen to be poor in a good area, you are screwed!
At least Sears tells you up front what the charge will be (and they usually have a sale on some installation service component. It's a good starting point for then negotiating with a private installer if you wish to do so.
Alex
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The plumber finishes the job and gives him the bill and the customer says, "I'm a surgeon and I don't make this much money."
The plumber says, "I know. I didn't make as much either, when I was a surgeon."
This is not to say the bill was reasonable. The OP should see if a new valve was installed, and then could call another plumber and ask what his price would be.
Then he could call the plumber who did the work, and say he thinks there was a mistake on the bill, blah, blah, blah. If he says, I think your rates are criminal and he wants a refund of part, the guy will just get angry. I've never tried my plan either, but you never know.
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mm wrote:

The time for that kind of thing is BEFORE the work is done.
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Of course, and others had already said that, but before is gone and after has begun.
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mm wrote:

That's the time to learn from one's mistakes.
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wrote:

Well, either he got some sort of quote/estimate ahead of time, and should just stick to what he agreed to, or he didn't and should put any excess down as a stupid tax. (or educational expense). I've got $1000 windows in my house, which is how I learned to not be in such a damn hurry, to do a little more research, and to trust the little warning bell that says "this guy is a sleazeball".
(I mean, granted, they're 44" wide, 102" high, triple-glaze argon filled, with a 50 year warranty against seal failure and rocks, which may or may not turn out to be good, but still....)
Think of it as part of growing up.
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