Cost to install a concrete pad?

I've been hallucinating about installing a concrete pad of about 1000 sq feet out the back. This would involve moving a little bit of earth, but not a whole lot -- it's almost level, and it's currently planted in grass. It would be intended to accommodate a storage building and a patio, and it should be able to be be driven on with an average size vehicle (say 4000 #). Clay soil, if that matters.
Would anyone care to take a wild guess at how much it would cost me to buy this done?
Would anyone care to take a wild guess at how much it would cost me and how difficult it would be for me to do it muself? (Bearing in mind that I habe never done anything like this.)
Thanks!
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The Other Harry wrote:

look in yellow pages and see how much the concrete delivery sources charge for a few yards of concrete now.... 10 ft. by 1000 ft= 1000 sq. ft, by 6 inches thickP0 cu. ft. 1 cub. yard has 3X 3X 3= 27 cut. ft.. 500 / 27 = 18.5 yds.. at how much a yard. and thats only for the truck to pour the stuff if they can get to it by driving to the back and pouring it... how many guys you gonna have helping you with wheel barrows etc.. and shovels and bull nose trowels and what about wire mesh for the concrete and the footings to hold the form down until the concrete dries...... a whole lot of money after you find out what the cost is per yard in your region.....
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Total: $2120
I would NEVER consider having flat work (a flat concrete slab) done. For what it costs in materials, and the skills involved, I can do it myself, still pay the guys a few bucks (or call in some favors) and give them some BBQ, or pizza, and beer, and have an easy day of it. If I have the form ready, we will be done by noon. I get to keep the $1490 in my pocket.
Please let me know how my figures compare with your area. I would be interested in how close I came. Even with the concrete at $50 per yard, you still would save over a grand. If you want to get fancy, you can use some plywood to make curved edges, brick the edges, or patterns within the pour, some rock salt to make a pitted surface, some aggregate sprinkled on top to make a pebbled effect, or stain it after it dries. Lots of easy to do things.
All in all, you can save an awful lot on concrete work if you want to do the labor yourself.
Just MHO, YMMV.
Steve
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I paid about $65 a yard for 7 yards in CT. Saturday delivery would have b een more.

Agreed. This is too big a job for one man, but One with a little experience and yourself it can be done.
Do not expect the guy on the truck to help either. I did one job where the guy got right down with us and helped, but it was out of boredom for him, not a requirement. He did get a rather nice tip though.
You also need a plan for the excess material. You bought it, you own it, it will be delivered. Form out a small pad in back of the garage to hold the trash cans. If you have extra, dump it there. No extra, you can buy a couple of bags of Reddi-mix later. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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The Other Harry wrote:

If you don't have a clue how to do this then I wouldn't. Only experience finishers know when its time to float the cream to the top and how to level it so you don't get low spots. If you don't know the timing of concrete and how it starts to setup you could end up with a big mess. For someone that has some knowledge of concrete then its not a big deal. In your case if it's just a pad that will support cars and there is no need to make the finish real clean and level with no duck ponds then at least find some guys that have done it or watch it being done from start to finish and take notes. It's hard work moving tons of concrete around even a shovel full so be ready to sweat and sweat hard! Don't forget your expansion joints if you don't want it to crack.
Tools you will need: screed, bull float (to bring the creamy cement to the top and the aggregate to the bottom) with extension poles, edgers, expansion joint tool or cut them in later with a concrete saw, fresno for fine finish, broom for a no skid finish. Fine finish is better for garage surface to remove dripping oil stains. And plenty of shovels and good backs!
All the other posts covered the rest of what you need to know.
Good Luck, Rich
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Concrete cost $60 - $70 per cubic yard here.
Contracted work including concrete, forms, minimum grade work, steel placement on work not requiring a pump runs $3-$5 per square foot here. Decorative concrete runs about $9.
First round pump in the $400 range, a later pour might go for 1/2.
A man with a skid steer and dump truck runs about $300 / day here.
If you do not have concrete tools or experience, I don't think you should start with a 1,000 SF hard troweled slab.
Your building may require footing excavation and permits. Many flat work contractors do not provide this service. You may well be looking for 2 different contractors. Most flatwork contractors won't even want to remove the sod and haul it off , but they may have an excavator with whom they work.
Call a local concrete contractor. If you do not know any, contact a local ready mix company and ask them for some names for your size job. Discuss the project with the contractor, ask him what phases, if any, you can perform to save money. If you remove the sod, it will be cheaper. If you level the site, it will be cheaper. Most contractors will be happy to give you advice. He will be looking over the difficulties on your site as well as judging you and your project.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Hallucinations are unreal.
Get real go out and talk to these guys that are forming and twisting steel, after you get a couple of fast talking contractors to give an estimate.
A permit is cheaper than a hassle. Your neighbors will appreciate it.

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