Cost of Comcast running cable

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I have a house that isnt wired for any cable, I contracted with Comcast to instal cable in 5 rooms but canceled the instal because nobody at comcast would give me any type of estimate on cost. I emailed and spoke to severasl people at comcast and could get no idea on price, they have no office in my area of Chicago. What could the aproximate cost be for running 5 rooms, a 60ft brick 2 story house, all cable would come in one side easily accesable. Trees block satelite dishes, UVerse isnt here yet, so its comcast. If its 500 or over I could hire a friend and do it cheaper, does anyone have any idea on what they will charge me. Without any estimate I could imagine a 1000$ bill I dont want.
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On 8/28/2010 6:49 AM, ransley wrote:

It's hard to say but they should be able to give you an hourly charge.
I've had them do work for a new internet hard wire required by a client of mine a couple of years ago and it only took an hour for $20. It was a fairly complex stringing. They did not charge for materials.
Later I had a couple of TV cables restrung and I think it was only $40. It, too was complex, as they had to go in and out of rooms and attic and outside.
I could do the work when I was young and agile but now pay to have it done. They're also adept at making good cable connections and can check signal strength, which I can't.
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ransley wrote:

I can't speak to the cost, but I wouldn't let comcast or any other cable/satt company do the in-house wiring on a bet. Every 'company' install I have ever seen was done the cheapest most hillbilly way possible, usually on the outside of the house, or if it was in the basement or attic, the cable was just draped or stapled wherever. Comcast uses subcontractors for work like that, at least around here, and they are paid by the drop. No in-wall boxes ever, just holes in wall or floor with the cable stuck through them. I would definitely call your friend for a walk-through, and see what he says. Is basement ceiling open? If putting boxes in walls is too complex, you can still do a through-the floor to a wiremold-style box attached to baseboard, and have it look halfway decent. If there is no good path to attic from basement, you can do one outside wire from demarc location up the side of house to soffit, and get into attic that way. Tuck it behind a downspout or something, and then come down from attic through walls, or even tucked in a blind corner of the bedroom closets, and have it look halfway decent. If your friend seems hesitant, look in local ad paper for that part of town- almost all have semi-retired or moonlighting ma bell or other wire-pullers that do jobs like this. Insist on a name brand rg6 quad cable, not the cheap generic stuff, and good quality compression, not crimped, connectors.
Are you sure you can't get Satt at the location? If you can't see SW sky, Dish has other birds where you can point to the SE and get signal. The dish also does not have to be on the roof- it can be on a post in the yard, assuming the neighbors won't break or steal it.
I would also keep a roof or attic antenna for OTA reception as a backup, even if you have to buy converter boxes for old TVs. Lotsa local stations around metro Chicago, so you would still have TV when the cable was out or the dish was iced up.
--
aem sends...

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Ditto that. Some of the 'installations' I've seen were so bad they were _almost_ funny. One house they ran the cable up the house wall, into the gutter and along the bottom of the gutter, out the gutter, wrapped around the back of the house, back down the wall, along the wall, up the wall, and straight in through a hole poked in the stucco. There must have been 150' of cable. This when the basement was open, unfinished, and the house was balloon-framed with no insulation.
R
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On 8/28/2010 9:03 AM, RicodJour wrote:

Double Ditto that. This happened a bunch of year ago in an apartment building near Chicago. They put the main drop into the attic for the whole building and then came into each apartment through a closet. In my mother's apartment they proceeded to run black coax along the white baseboard, up and around 5 windows, down again to the baseboard, along the baseboard on another wall, up over the front door, along the baseboard of another wall, turn the corner, along the baseboard of that wall and finally to the TV, stapling it all the way. I sure hope they do better today.
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No they dont do better, at my building I even have signs up denying cable companies work unless I approve it, they dont care what they do as long as its fast.
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A year ago I asked Dish if they had a satelite SE they said no, is this a relatively new sattelite, in Chicago here all I see are SW pointing dishes, although I saw one or 2 pointing SE. I had an exterior antenna I took down and will put up a new one and run two cables when I do this. I would rather have dish, its cheaper and HD is free unlike comcast.
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I will call Dish for the SE sattelite, Dish would be great, alot cheaper than comcast HD
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ransley wrote:

my directv dish is pointed se-ish.
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wrote:

Boxes in the wall are NOT required - but a low voltage cable pass through wall plate should be used. They snap into a hule in the drywall for a finished look.
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On 8/28/2010 6:49 AM, ransley wrote:

At least in my market Comcast will tell you up front that they aren't set up to do the sort of work you describe due to the fishing and fussiness of old work. Also some folks are looking for a new paint job or carpeting out of the deal and that further discourages them.
If you hire your friend make sure they use good connectors such as snap seals (same thing the cable company uses) and not those novelty class twist on connectors.
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[snip]

At one time I used twist on connectors. They didn't work very well. They pulled off too easily, and the connections have poor shielding. Crimp connectors help, but compression connectors are better.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 8/28/2010 1:08 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Cable companies aren't noted for spending money. There is a reason they use snap seal connectors for everything. That is they work in the initial "see it works phase" and unlike others they will continue to give trouble free performance for a long time.
As you noted the crimp connectors are only slightly better than the twist on connectors.
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I believe that we once had an exchange (a long time ago) in CHA (or some other forum) after you had switched to compression fittings but I had not where I defended (foolishly) screw-on connectors as being "good enough." What I soon discovered was that after just a few tugs for any reason the screw-ons started to fail. I then bought a compression tool, partly on your advice, and changed most of my runs to RG6QS. What a difference. Just a little bit of RF leakage can really screw up the image, especially in a home CATV/CCTV hybrid network.
The best part is that once you get a good hand stripper set to the proper dimensions, it's a very quick process and every fitting looks perfect. I've had to get a T-handle wrench to ram the connector's shield cylinder into the cable jacket because of loss of hand strength issue. Before, I just used a nut driver and before that, just my fingers )-:
Allelectronics has a compression tool for $15 that's in the little kit I keep at the "head end" of the HA system.
http://www.allelectronics.com/make-a-store/item/CT-56/HEX-CRIMP_TOOL_FOR_COAX_CONNECTORS/-/1.html
Ironically, it's mislabeled as a hex crimper. I thought I *was* buying a hex crimper because I wanted to use up all the old hex fittings I have around but D'oh, there's no place I'd ever use them instead of compression fittings. As luck would have it, it was a compression unit so it's now part of a small toolkit at the circuit box and alarm panel. I really should just toss the hex fittings - they are just nowhere near as reliable as a good compression fitting. Maybe I'll round 'em up and put them on Ebay since I don't even have hex crimper.
The screw-on ones are actually still useful for making very temporary ends for cable before I make a final trim. I still use them for that task when running CCTV, which is only thin RG-59. (I've learned to stay away from the 80% braid - just not enough material to make good physical contact, especially if you're not perfect at skinning the jacket.)
The AllElectronics crimper is nowhere near as good as the Platinum super-adjustable, but good enough. With two, I can set one up for the thick RG6QS and the other for the RG-59U and really rip through cabling jobs. Not sure how long CCTV is going to stay analog (the rest of the time I live here, it will!) but running RG-59 and CAT-6 are pretty similar tasks. The CAT-6 gets 4 channels to the one RG-59 carries, so it will win out, eventually.
So, anyway, thanks Mark for singing the praises of compression fittings on CATV cabling. It finally paid off for me. By doing it myself, I've saved more than enough to be able to afford the gold plated connectors.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

Have your buddy pull in the cable then call comcast to do the terminations - no cost (at least that's how Rogers works). Just make sure you are using the RIGHT cable. Check with your cable provider - most are now using 100% double sheilded cable - stiff stuff to work with and not simple to terminate, compared to the old 80% braid.
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On 8/28/2010 6:49 AM, ransley wrote:

My impression is that Comcast doesn't charge to put in cable (for a couple rooms or so), they also don't do a very good job. At least no one I know has had to pay one.
The parts are cheap, I'd be inclined to get it done yourself, rather than have someone drilling holes through your walls. You may wish to have them do as much free as possible, that doesn't wreck your home.
I've run cabling the right way, through walls and such, and I've never seen a Comcast installer do that. At least, I'd get to know the installer and cut a deal and perhaps pay him. Here, they all appear to be contractors, and a little extra money would be good. You'd be surprised what people will do for $20 off the books, let alone $100. All people respond to attitude, be nice.
YMMV, and your location may be different. And my experience is not recent.
Jeff
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I ran my cable under the house. Didn't have to drill, specially through that stupid short shag carpeting. Jes put a 44 mag round through the floor. Big fun and worked great!
nb
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On 8/28/2010 9:21 AM, notbob wrote:

Genius!
Jeff
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Not really. He frequently goes around shooting up the house. It's about time he figured out what to do with the holes. ;)
R
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Hummingbird nests.
nb
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