corroded battery removal

Black & Decker Laser Level uses three 1.5 volt batteries which are and corroded. They won't come out. Is there any way to remove them?
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If the hardware is basically toast try soaking the device in ammonia or vinegar. This (usually) loosens the corrosion and allows the batteries to be removed.
Afterward flush the device with water and set in the sun to dry. Be aware that corrosion on the electronics tends to follow the 'leads' into the chips and the devices usually fails over time. Often faster then it would otherwise.
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On 5/25/2013 8:46 AM, NotMe wrote:

Don't know how the batteries mount in you device, however, I have poked or drilled a small hole in the negative end of the battery and used a sheet metal screw, screwed into the hole, as a pulling handle.
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On Sat, 25 May 2013 07:46:25 -0500, NotMe wrote:

The good news is that the battery manufacturer "may" reimburse you for your damage caused by the batteries.
I had a Maglight aluminum flashlight, which I offered to send to Duracell but they simply asked me how much it cost, and sent me a check for that amount (about $20 in my case).
So, if/when you do get the batteries out, save them, and contact the manufacturer. They will ask for the date code on *each* battery (they told me most of the time the corrosion is due to dissimilar dates being put together - I don't know how true that may actually be though).
In my maglight situation, I banged the hell out of the flashlight to free the batteries.
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"Danny D." wrote:

If it's something of more significant value than a basic flashlight, the battery company will likely send you a pre-paid mailing kit to ship it to them for evaluation. Unless the device tried to charge the non-rechargable batteries or similar, they will most likely send you a check for the cost of the unit. They are generally quite good about this since they don't get that many claims. Of course the important thing to remember is to remove the batteries from devices in storage and to check the batteries periodically on regular use devices since leaks have been known to occur before the batteries are actually dead.
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or

ries to

-

Definitely contact the battery manufacturer, assuming the batteries are from a "name" brand and not some elcheapo source. I have always had good luck doing that.
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Which model? I cannot seem to find the one that uses 3 AA batteries.
How about a photo of the battery compartment.
cheers Bob
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