Corner sink installation

Recently redid our tiny (4'x4') half-bath. I purchased a small corner sink that nicely fits the available space. The sink (Elizabethan Classic from Vintage Tub) has a pair of tongue-like wall-mount brackets that fit into narrow wells on the side walls toward the outer edges of the sink. After careful measurement, drilling and mounting, the brackets are in the right places, the sink fits nicely down onto the brackets, but, the sink wants to tip itself downward toward the front. I don't think the drainpipe or the supply plumbing should be being used as counterbalance or as support to keep this from happening. Looking for any suggestions to make the installation more stable, especially knowing that someone, sometime, is going to lean on the front lip of the sink.
Chuck Reti Detroit MI
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On 12/7/2004 10:53 PM US(ET), Chuck Reti took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

Looking at the sink on the site http://www.vintagetub.com/asp/product_detail.asp?item_no etcbwh it seems that the drain pipe indeed is used as an additional support. Do you have metal drain pipes? The only other thing I can think of is a pair of legs on the front of the sink.
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How solid are your mount points, and how square is the wall/corner? If there is any flex at all, the sink will act like a lever and try to rotate around the mount tabs. Drywall or plaster is often not solid enough- back in the stone age, we would bury solid wood or plywood in the finish wall, screwed to at least two studs and several inches tall, for any mount brackets that needed to hold more than a couple of pounds. Took a little art to mud it into place so it was flush with the finish wall. Crude alternative would be to add decorative wood plates (heavily urethaned, of course) behind the sink, and screw those to the studs. Ideally, there should be 2x6 or 2x8 blocking between the studs at sink height, going wider than the sink, to keep everything stiff and square. Stuff like this is a good example of why wall-hung toilets never really caught on for residential use- you have to build the wall a lot more carefully.
aem sends....
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Chuck Reti wrote:

There should be 2 holes in the back of the sink to install lag bolts. I have never seen a wall mount that did not have these in addition to the support tabs.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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