Cordless Tools - Another SUCKER PRODUCT

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I have decided to add all cordless tools to the list of SUCKER PRODUCTS. People who buy SUCKER PRODUCTS are truly suckers, and the companies that make and see these products know there is a sucker born every minute. YOU could be one of them.
You might think that $49.99 cordless drill on sale at $39.99 is a bargain, and you quickly open your wallet and dump that amount on the checkout counter. You get home and find this so called tool lacks power, but you manage to use it on jobs with low power demands. Then one year comes along and the battery is so weak it will only drive 8 screws before the battery needs a recharge. Being the sucker that you are, you plunk down $70 for a new battery, and the company laughs at you all the way to the bank, knowing how much of a sucker you are for spending more than the cost of the drill for a replacement battery. Of course, in another year, they'll get to laugh again when you need another new battery, and year after year they laugh at your stupidity.
Cordless tools are not really tools anyhow. They're TOYS. Remember when you were a kid and has a toy drill that ran on 2 D-cell batteries. Well, these so called cordless tools are just a slight improvement. Consider them "Toys for Adults". These differ from the REAL tools that adults used to get in the mid 1900's. Those came with electrical cords and had power. But the manufacturers of these cordless tools figured they would make the cord look like some sort of enemy and using the right wording, they convinced many once sane adults that these cordless tools are an improvement because they dotn have a cord. Well, excuse me, but but I'll struggle with the cord a lot easier than when the goddamn batteries go dead halfway thru a job.
But suckers buy these things by the case, and spend a fortune on batteries yearly, rather than struggle with a cord, which might get in the way......
Oh well, the suckers who buy these cordless toys are the same idiots who buy ink jet printers. These fools spend $29.95 for the printer, then spend $50 for ink every two months. And anyone with a brain knows that the cost to make this ink is less than one half dollar. The sellers of that ink KNOW you're a sucker, and they spend half of each work day just laughing their asses off at the suckers that buy their expensive ink refills.
Now you know the reason that after clothing, cordless tools and ink jet printers are the number one items sold at rummage and garage sales. Most of the time these items work just fine, that's after you spend a fortune on batteries or ink. And the people who run these rummage sales also know there's a sucker born every minute, and that sucker could be YOU.
And if you think the list of SUCKER PRODUCTS ends here, think again. Everytime you spend $4 for a gallon of gasoline, YOU ARE A SUCKER. Everytime you spend $5 for a loaf of bread, YOU ARE A SUCKER. These companies KNOW that you must have that gas to drive and that bread to eat. Unfortunately, many of us have no choices when it comes to gasoline and food, but I'll be the first person to NEVER buy another cordless tool or inkjet printer. There are alternatives !!!!
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On Jun 7, 7:38 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

low cost tools of any type are designed for price not function.
buy a cheap cordless anything, gets you something cheap, which is what you paid for.
the primecell.com rebuilt battery packs are great, way better capacity than new, its amazing...
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On 6/7/2011 7:38 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Little rambling, but I take your point that while tool may be cheap, to keep it running with new batteries is where company makes it's profit.
I'll never buy another HP printer for this reason. First they made it impossible to reload your own ink and now the newest printer I have refused to function until I replaced the color cartridge which cost $40.
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Frank wrote the following:

I have a HP Photosmart 8250 printer. It has 5 color cartridges. I don't buy HP replacement ink cartridges. I buy cartridges from online companies whose prices are less than 1/4 the price of the HP cartridges. They work the same, although the printer advises you that it is not an HP printer cartridge when first used, but accepts it anyway. As for cordless tools, and I only have 2, a 3/8" Ryobi drill/driver and a 1/2" Makita hammer drill/driver. I don't have 200' of extension cords to drill holes or install screws in a fence at the back of my property. The other drill/drivers I have are corded 3/8", and 1/2".
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 6/7/2011 12:38 PM, willshak wrote:

I buy on line cartridges for my personal printer which is older and does not recognize cartridge source. But, I have a clients machine, who pays for cartridges and I have no manual on newer printer and just buy ad hoc. Pissed me off the other day when it refused to print with new BW cartridge and made me buy a new color one before it would print. Wife's HP is newer than mine, and finicky too. She had to have it replaced when it failed and must have been on line for four hours with HP. It was so long that batteries in phone drained and she had to call back on another phone - all for a $60 printer.
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On Tue, 7 Jun 2011 08:02:40 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

I borrowed an 18v large cordless drill to remove 3" deck screws from a deck where there was no electricity. I dont recall the brand, it was not a known one. It could not handle any of them and I just charged it. I had a friend come who had a top dollar DeWalt. It was fully charged and it took out 3 screws before it pooped out. We removed the rest of them by hand, and decided to just move the whole deck minus the posts (legs). {which is what we had removed). When I got it home, I had to remove more screws to make it fit the place I was putting it. A corded 120V drill took those screws right out (except those with stripped heads). I guess it depends on what you're using them on. They dont have power like a corded one no matter how good the brand name.
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On 6/7/2011 8:47 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I am confused. You used an obscure brand name 18v drill in unknown condition and it performed poorly and now all cordless tools are bad?
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wrote:

I just love the say idiots like you snip out parts of a message and comment ONLY on that part. What about the top dollar DeWalt I mentioned. Ahhhhh fuckit, you aint worth another second of my time!
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On 6/7/2011 7:38 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Hardly, cordless tools are quite useful and a valuable thing to have. Whether you see it or not your post has nothing to do with cordless tools but all to do with realizing that cheap things are often the most expensive version of something you can buy.
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On 6/7/2011 7:38 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

same goes for electric cars.
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On 6/7/2011 9:19 AM, WeinerWaggon wrote:

First thing I ever did when I heard of the Prius was to try to google up cost of battery replacement. All I could find was an Australian post that quoted $7,000 Australian. How much do you think the car would be worth when the warranty is over and the batteries wear out?
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On 6/7/2011 12:34 PM, Frank wrote:

depends on scrap prices at the time
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On Tue, 07 Jun 2011 06:38:43 -0500, jw wrote:

I find mine quite handy. Just grab it and go, no extension cords, no plugs. Of course I'll use the electric for heavy or extensive use in one area. Right tool for the right job.
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I find mine very useful too. I bought a Ryobi Combo set, Drill, small Circ Saw, Light and a Sawsall many years ago. Most people think Ryobi is cheap. The Circ Saw can't cut much more than a 8' lenght of 3/4 plywood, whereas the drill, light, and Sawsall seems to last longer than I need. I have replaced the 2 batteries that came with the kit once. I dropped the drill from about 15 ft onto the ground with no damage a couple years ago.
I am not a construction worker, but I use the drill and light pretty often ( at least 2 a week ) for various tasks. I will buy them again or replace the batteries (whichever comes first).
Hank <~~~~ sucker for money
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Hank wrote:

Ryobi is made by Techtronic or One World, which also manufactures Milwaukee. Milwaukee nicad chargers are very different from Ryobi's, and Ryobi's nicad-only chargers are rather primitive and don't apply a final equalization charge after the regular charge, resulting in some cells going dead. Trickle charging seems to help make the batteries last longer, but do not do this with lithium batteries.
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I also bought the big Ryobi Combo set with two drills, chain saw, circular saw, light, cutoff saw, and sander. I have been happy with everthing except the chain saw which was a waste. I have used all the other tools a lot and have only had to replace the batteries once. My only complaint with the entire set is that I would perfer to have a double charger so I could put both batteries on to charge at the same time. I often wear down the batteries over the weekend and can only put one on to charge since I rarely get out to the shop during the week. The entire set was well worth the price and I would buy another set without question. I have a couple of other Ryobi tools and would also recommend them as well.
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wrote:

Maybe if you use it everyday it will pay for itself. If I still had one, I'd use it maybe twice a month is warm weather, and not at all in cold weather. So I use maybe 8 times. The following season the battery is weak, and needs to be replaced. EVERY FRIKKIN YEAR.
And what gets me is this. Why the hell cant they make an AC Adaptor for them? I'm almost finished with a job, I got 15 screws to put in, and the battery goes dead. A full charge takes 2 hours. This means I have to drag out the corded drill, put my screw bit in that drill, unwind extension cords, and finally finish the job, while the batteries charge for trhe cordless.
IF they made AC adaptors, all I'd have to do is drag out an extension cord...... But NO, they dont have AS adaptors...... Hell, why not just make the charger to ALSO work as an adaptor.....
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On 06/08/2011 01:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

The adapter would cost plenty and would have a short heavy cord from the adapter to the tool, and when people used it they would notice that they don't need a cordless drill most of the time. It would keep people from buying batteries and would be a kind of short cut to reverting to corded tools. The maker would be admitting how silly it is most of the time to use cordless tools.
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On 06/08/2011 01:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Simpler to just make a battery pack that accepts off-the-shelf "C" cells. That would break the addiction.
Or the manufacturers could have a convention to standardize the battery packs. Then there would be competition.
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Federal government should pass law standardizing packs to take commonly available rechargeable cells using nothing more than a screwdriver.
This would help cut crude oil use, and trim battery packs going to landfills too.
Wall worts thoseplug in power transformers should be standarized using a few models with standaridized plugs. That would allow reuse of transformers and cut trash to landfills.
before anyone goes off about more laws can you imagine if there were no standard batteries like AA , AAA, C and D. Or every vehicle used a propriety battery only available from the car maker..
Standards can be good for EVERYONE
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