cordless tools

Page 1 of 2  
I have a bunch of cordless tools purchased over the years from top of line Panasonic drills to junk Black & Deckers. Except for B&D they all worked pretty good when new but now all need batteries or will be needing it soon - different voltages, different companies and none are interchangeable. Part of my garage look like a repository for dead cordless tools. The cost for a new set of batteries are hard to justify even for the excellent Panasonic drills when a new and better model could be had for just a little more money than a set of batteries and charger. Do you keep on buying overpriced batteries, do you buy into an endless cycle of cordless (I'm such sucker for tools) or go back to corded tools (so reliable, almost indestructible, last forever and cheap when amortized over the years)?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have six sets od Ryobi batteries and all depleted within 2 to 3 years. If you work the Ryobi hard (and hot) like installing a fence or a deck with long screws the battery won't last over 6 months - properly the same with Panasonic but more so with Ryobi. Ryobi is good for the money but I wouldn't equate them as fine quality tools like Panasonic, Hilti or Milwaukee.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fred wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the heads up on the RC car racers. Are those old style chargers you were referring to? Mine won't let me charge when the battery is hot, and turn itself off when its fully charged so I could leave it in overnight or even over the weekend. It comes to the point to decide if I want to get some work done or baby the batteries - getting work done always come first. At one time I had 4 sets of the Ryobi batteries and two chargers running continuously and I was running out of batteries but my Panasonic with two sets of batteries and a factory 15 minute charger could work all day long without any interruptions. I know with a 15 minute fast charge the batteries won't last long (still lasted longer than the Roybi) but getting the work out is what its all about. The raw Panasonic batteries are pretty cheap at ebay and I'll get a few and rebuild my power packs when I have some time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Doesn't sound right, I would think even the 14.4V Ryobi should be stronger than a 12V Dewalt. The 18V should have some real arm breaking toque.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Excellent point. My experience was my 14.4V cheap Ryobi had more torque than my 12V Panasonic - what was a surprise. Now a Panasonic is every bit and then some, in my opinion, as good as a Dewalt. Below is the torque found on the web 12V vs. 14.4V. Couldn't find the torque for the 18V Ryobi but if anything like the smaller 14.4V Ryobi it would kill the 12V Dewalt.
12V Dewalt 300 in-lb 14.4V Ryobi 350 in-lb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rechargable batteries can last a long time if you Don`t follow the manufacturers instructions, Mainly don't over charge, a warm pack is fully charged, the heat you feel is chemical energy being transformed into mechanical energy, heat, eating the cells, or only use a peak charger, don't leave pack charging on a charger. Don`t over discharge, when a tool just slows it is dead, stop or damage occurs even cell polarity reversal. Cycle a pack never recharge immediately, or hot after use, wait a day. Tool manufacturers make their big money selling you new batteries. I have Makita packs from 1986 that still get some use. I never ruined a pack yet and have maybe 15. The people that know cells and how not to abuse them are RC car racers, Usually good articles in RC car magazines. If you can open the pack get new Sanyos or Panasonics, the industries best cell manufacturers and solder them in using heat sinks and quick soldering, heat kills them
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would be electrical energy being transformed into chemical energy,creating thermal energy(heat) in the process.
I would avoid any cordless tool that does not have a fast charger;one hour or less.(smart chargers)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My first cordless tools were Ryobis 5 years ago. The batteries are still fine.
I guess it pays to buy quality the first time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hate cordless tools. They cost a lot of money over the years and whats the point? A corded tool is cheaper, has more power, and dont die at the wrong moment, requiring you to stop the job till a battery charges. I bought a small generator for times when I cant get AC power. If you ask me, they are nothing but another way to make money. If you notice, they change the voltage every year or so, so you are stuck having to buy a new tool. unless you want to spend a fortune on "obsolete" batteries.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
did i hear ryobi and top quality in the same sentence? i know i didnt. but i thought i did i have a old dewalt corded drill that will blow the socks off any of your POS cordless drills
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AGREED 100%
95% of the time an extension cord does the trick and is the source of nearly unlimited power.
I also have a small inverter and 12 V battery I can use when I need a portable setup...
Cordless are a waste.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But the other 5% is sure is nice to have a cordless tool. Many people work on ladders, towers, great distances from electricity that just love cordless tools. Where I work, there is a 200' stack and the guys were doing maintenance up there with cordless tools. As for the other 95%, I still like the handy part of cordless. Don't like them, don't buy them. Your choice; that's what makes America great and keeps the Chinese tool makers in business.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Actually, I did sort of solve that problem. I never could understand why someone building a deck on their house would use a cordless tool to drive the decking screws, when there is an outlet right in the house within a short distance. However, there have been a couple of instances where a cordless would be helpful. Last year Walmart had a 6volt cordless drill for $9. It does not have a replaceable battery pack. The batteries are built right into the drill. It's obviously a disposible drill. It has a nice keyed chuck on it (and I hate keyless chucks). I was just looking into buying a replacement chuck for one of my corded drills, and the chuck was $13. I bought this $9 drill just for the chuck. However, I ended up charging it, and found it does a nice job for a very cheap drill. I'll use it till the batteries die, then remove the chuck and toss it. It worked nicely when I had to change my rural mailbox, and didn't want to bother hauling the generator and too far from the house for AC power. Normally I would have just used a common screwdriver for this job but it was freezing cold outside when the snowplow knocked my mailbox off the post. This cheapie drill made the job fast enough that I didnt get my fingers and toes frozen in the process.
Most people would consider this drill a toy. IT IS..... But I consider ALL cordless tools toys.... I normally would not have bought something like this, except for the chuck. I would not have. But even if it only lasts a year, it's worth the $9. Big difference between this and spending $200 for a "brand name" and then another $50 for each additional battery.
Gerry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanic, nicads and nimh can be stored well , they need to be left discharged for best results, only lead-acid batteries should be left fully charged.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had an old (30 years ago) cheap B&D drill that had the best chuck I ever used. For hte most part, the keyless are pretty crappy, but so are the cheap keyed chucks. I recently bought a Panasonic with keyless that operates with one hand. It has not let me down yet. A few good ones do exist.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fred, check out ebay for replacement batteries they some times have good prices. Then have a garage sale and sell the old tools cheap and then go buy a new drill. Muff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Right, but then why did you buy Ryobi? I won't touch one of their tools again. IMO, they are crap but I' glad you are happy with yours. Batteries are junk after a year, switch needed to be replaced. Not worth it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve@carolinabreezehvac posted for all of us...

but my experience was poor with them. Maybe snap up the old red stuff in stock. Haven't had a chance to destroy the line yet.
--

Tekkie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I really like my Panasonic drill, but I've had it less than a years so I can't say how well the batteries will hold up. The power to weight ratio is very good though. Easier to handle than my older lesser powered tool.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.