Cordless tool batteries

Need new set of cordless powertools and debating about the batteries and chargers. I'mgetting nose bleeds just reading all the variables in fast-charge chargers, NiCads, etc. To those home repair vets out there, am I better off getting a set that comes with the type of charger that requires an excessively long initial charge, say 6 to 9 hrs, and then moderate re-charge times (3 to 5 hrs) vs. the fast 1-hr charger types?
What about trickle charges, do those chargers that offer that option really work or do all batteries essentially die the same? I'm really confused....
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Paul R
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<< I'm getting nose bleeds just reading all the variables in fast-charge chargers, NiCads, etc. >>
You're looking at the wrong reason to pick one tool over the other. You should buy performance, e.g., 18V Milwaukee or DeWalt drills are serious pro's choices, and got good ratings from Consumer Reports. Ask yourself whether you really need battery power. In a home or business workshop, corded tools make more sense, and surprisingly, there are air powered analogs that have many advantages. Of course, hanging plywood in a high wind doesn't apply there. Battery stores are springing up everywhere, so getting a replacement set for any tool is about half the price of new. For the real skinny, you might see if you have an Interstate battery store (or similar) in your area and talk to the batttery rebuilding technician for insights on the best units. HTH
Joe
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Pick a quality tool first. The better brands have good batteries that will last a long time. Two or four years down the road, you can have them rebuilt. Places such as http://www.primecell.com/pctools.htm can do them at reasonable charge.
If you want good tools, buy Milwaukee, Bosch, DeWalt, Porter Cable. Avoid brands like Ryobi, Black & Decker, Skill, and the other low priced brands. Ed
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It depends upon your needs I have a Ryobi set and it has worked fine for me. I even have a cordless 18v string trimmer for my small needs it works fine. It also uses the same batteries as my 18v tools. The 1/2" cordless drill has worked fine for me. Battery life could be better but the prices are so much loser that it is not that big of a deal. If I used the stuff all the time I would look at Bosch or Panasonic. Dewalt since being purchased by B&D has gone down hill. Don't get 18v just because you think more is better. The batteries are large and make the tool heavy.
This 18v set for the price is hard to beat
http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@1626069362.1095523221@@@@&BV_EngineIDceadcmihmjhfkcgelceffdfgidgjl.0&MID76
14v set
http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@1626069362.1095523221@@@@&BV_EngineIDceadcmihmjhfkcgelceffdfgidgjl.0&MID76
this set for 250.00 bucks is hard to beat
http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@1626069362.1095523221@@@@&BV_EngineIDceadcmihmjhfkcgelceffdfgidgjl.0&MID76
Panasonic drill gets rave reviews but the drill along is $ 200.00. If it is for your business it makes sense for the once in a while user (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Wayne

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...

That's what I thought. My feelings have changed.
My Ryobi is less than 2 years old. Not used heavily, but used every week in my woodworking shop. The batteries will not last more than a day just sitting without losing their charge. They lose power fast. I've had to replace the switch ($26.00) as it not longer gave me variable speed.
If I go to Home Depot, I can buy a brand new drill with two batteries and charger for less than I can buy 2 new batteries. For twice the price, I can buy one of the better brands and it would have more power and give longer performance making it a better deal in the long run. Our Porter Cable at work gets far more use than my Ryobi and it is still working well after 4 1/2 years. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

All rechargable batteries fade over the course of a few years, so I have steered away from them entirely. It would be different if I were a pro and could expect to cycle the battery many times per year.
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True, and I'm willing to pay for the privilege of not dragging cords around. The Ryobi just went down hill much faster than expected.
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I am using a 4 year old 9v Makita drill with 2 batteries and my wife is still using my 8 year old one. Our secret is we USE them. All 4 batteries get cycled at least once a week. Don't leave them laying around dead either. Put them on the charger right away when they die.
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By product quality, cheap drills have batteries that are poorly made. Buy a charger that turns off when battery is fully charged, a peak detection charger. You get what you pay for.
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m Ransley wrote:

My next door neighbor is an example: he told me he had a Black&Decker 18v combo that came with a "radio" charger (I guess it's a portable radio that also charges the batteries?). He told me his initial battery charge had to be for *9* hrs and that each subsequent re-charge was anywhere between 3 and 6 hrs, depending on how drained the battery was (Is this right, 3 to *6* hrs???). Anyway, he told me not to waste time on a similar set and to look for any 18v set that comes with the rapid (1 hr) charger.
Now, are there generic chargers that work with most any battery, like the ones you suggest that turn off after fully cherging the battery, or do I have to go to the tool mfgr and look for their cut-off or trickle charger?
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Paul R
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A charger measures peak charge by when voltage starts to drop. It is also when temperature increases and electrical energy is being converted to mechanical energy, thereby cooking the cell. Whatever you buy it must detect and turn off at the peak voltage or you ruin the life of your batteries. Dont beleive the constant on slow chargers that say you can leave batteries in forever. I have Makita packs that still work from 96. I have cheap Ryobi that are 1 yr old and go dead in a day. The better equipment use Panasonic or Sanyo cells and good peak detection chargers. Generic ? you may find after research and your purchase you have crap. Milwaukee , Mikita, Porter Cable, Bosch, Panasonic are tops. Look at Milwaukee great warranty and at least all the profits are not going overseas.
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Re: milwaukee- as of a couple of weeks ago, milwaukee was sold (along with the rest of the holdings) to techtronics, the big chinese (I think) conglomerate, who also makes.....wait for it.....ryobi. So, regarding the profits NOT going overseas.... they will be.
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I bought a reconditioned 12v Dewalt drill about 3-4 years ago. Good compromise between weight and power. It does well enough with a spade bit or hole saw through 2x lumber. No problem with the one-hour battery charger. Sure is handy having two batteries (drill came with two, as part of the package).
Bill

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IMO,NiCds last longer when used with a fast charger;1 hr or less. Also,they're a "use-it-or-lose it" type of thing.
Many drill/drivers now come with NiMH cells,though.
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Jim Yanik
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wrote:

--------------- I have had very good experience with Bosch 18V tools. The batteries are interchangeable between tools, and their staying power has impressed me. You can find 4 or 5 tool sets at the big box stores.
BTW, I didn't go with the 24V volt tools because of cost and weight. Nevertheless, the 18V tools hold their power for a long time, and power through some pretty long projects without changing batteries. Just my 2 cents.
In addition, the Bosch warranty is excellent!
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Being in the business of selling tools to industrial customers I would let you know that DeWalt is probably the most RETURNED\WARRANTY issue manufacturer that I sell. Not a bad tool, but many issues. Milwaukee or Bosch is your best bet. Bosch being the better of the two, but much HEAVIER duty tool.

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How about Porter Cable, I have 11 of their tools, all fine after 11 years
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